Prehistoric Copper Mining in Michigan: The Nineteenth-Century Discovery of “Ancient Diggings” in the Keweenaw Peninsula and Isle Royale

John R. Halsey

AP 99

Explorers in the nineteenth century found many pits and tools along rich copper seams in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula–evidence that prehistoric inhabitants mined copper there for thousands of years. John Halsey, former state archaeologist of Michigan, tells the story of those who discovered the ancient mines in this thorough and engaging tale.

Culture Change in a Bedouin Tribe: The ‘arab al-Ḥǧerāt, Lower Galilee, A.D. 1790-1977

Rohn Eloul

AP 97

Against the historical dynamics of this complex region, this richly documented volume reconstructs the growth of the ‘arab al-Ḥǧerāt of the Galilee from some five herding households at the end of the Ottoman eighteenth century into a thriving sedentary tribe of regional importance nearly 200 years later.

The Last Pescadores of Chimalhuacán, Mexico: An Archaeological Ethnography

Jeffrey R. Parsons

AP 96

Based on his study of the nearly vanished aquatic economy of Chimalhuacán in the Valley of Mexico, Parsons describes the surviving vestiges of aquatic insect collection and fishing and considers their developmental and archaeological implications within a broad context of historical, ethnographic, biological, ecological, and archaeological information from Mexico, North and South America, the Near East, and Africa.

West African Early Towns: Archaeology of Households in Urban Landscapes

Augustin F.C. Holl

AP 95

West African Awdaghost (Tegdaoust) emerged as a vital medieval trade center before its decline in the sixteenth century AD. Extensively excavated and accompanied by a large body of published material, Awdaghost provides a unique opportunity for the application of household archaeology to a West African settlement.

The Last Saltmakers of Nexquipayac, Mexico: An Archaeological Ethnography

Jeffrey R. Parsons

AP 92

In the 1980s, a few traditional saltmakers were still manufacturing several kinds of salt in the eastern Valley of Mexico. This in-depth study of the methodology of this dying craft includes a comparative study of pre-industrial saltmaking around the world and considers the implications of this knowledge for future archaeological research.

Caciques and Their People: A Volume in Honor of Ronald Spores

Joyce Marcus and Judith Francis Zeitlin

AP 89

A volume of essays by Mesoamerican scholars on topics ranging from Zapotec archaeology to Cuicatec irrigation and Mixtec codices to Aztec ethnohistory. Authors use a direct historical approach, the comparative method, or develop models that contribute to ethnological and archaeological theory.

The Nature and Status of Ethnobotany (2nd Edition)

Richard I. Ford

AP 67

Nature and Status, published in 1978, is still a standard text of the discipline, with classic papers exploring theoretical issues, principles of plant utilization, prehistoric economics, and more. A reprint of this watershed volume includes all these classic papers, a new 30-page introduction by Ford, and pages of new references.

Maguey Utilization in Highland Central Mexico: An Archaeological Ethnography

Jeffrey R. Parsons and Mary H. Parsons

AP 82

The maguey plant plays a central role in cultural adaptation and cultural change in highland Mesoamerica. This book is a comprehensive study of the plant and its use. Includes chapters on maguey cultivation and pulque production, maguey fiber processing and spinning, and the archaeological implications of the available ethnographic and historic information about maguey utilization.

The Foxie Otter Site: A Multicomponent Occupation North of Lake Huron

Christopher C. Hanks

AP 79

In this volume, the author reports on the excavation and interpretation of the Foxie Otter Site, a large archaeological site on Fox Lake in Ontario, Canada. This site, which was used by native people for about 7,000 years, contains one of the longest archaeological records in the Upper Great Lakes.

Primitive Polluters: Semang Impact on the Malaysian Tropical Rain Forest Ecosystem

A. Terry Rambo

AP 76

In the 1970s, A. Terry Rambo conducted fieldwork in Peninsular Malaysia with a group of Semang people. The community he studied had a seminomadic lifestyle: at times they stayed in houses or lean-tos in a village, and at other times they foraged in the surrounding rain forest for food. Rambo’s goal was to assess this group’s impact on the local environment.

The Archaeology of the Sierra Blanca Region of Southeastern New Mexico

Jane Holden Kelley

AP 74

In this monumental work, Jane Holden Kelley preserved archaeological data from many important sites in southeastern New Mexico, many of which no longer exist. She also established a basic chronological framework for the upland portion of this area. Sites discussed include Bloom Mound and the Bonnell site, as well as many sites in the Upper Gallo Drainage, the Upper Hondo Drainage, the Upper Macho Drainage, and north of Capitan Mountain.

Paleoethnobotany of the Kameda Peninsula Jomon

Gary W. Crawford

AP 73

In this volume, author Gary W. Crawford presents archaeological data he gathered on plant utilization by Jomon populations in southwestern Hokkaido. Using this data, he examines the adaptations of the Initial through Middle Jomon (a period from 8000 BP to 4000 BP). He also considers the success of the Jomon adaptation in northeastern Japan in general.

Lulu Linear Punctated: Essays in Honor of George Irving Quimby

Robert C. Dunnell and Donald K. Grayson

AP 72

Many archaeologists and anthropologists of note contributed chapters to this collection, which pays tribute to archaeologist George Irving Quimby on his 1983 retirement from the University of Washington. James Griffin, Albert Spaulding, Lewis Binford, David Brose, and many more write here about archaeology in the Midwest and other areas of North America. Griffin contributes the first chapter: “George Irving Quimby: The Formative Years.”