Cueva Blanca: Social Change in the Archaic of the Valley of Oaxaca

Kent V. Flannery and Frank Hole

M 60

Archaeologists Flannery and Hole excavated a series of Archaic sites in the Valley of Oaxaca, including Cueva Blanca, as part of a project on the prehistory and human ecology of this region of Mexico. This cave yielded artifacts from the Late Pleistocene through the Early Archaic to the Late Archaic.

Prehistoric Copper Mining in Michigan: The Nineteenth-Century Discovery of “Ancient Diggings” in the Keweenaw Peninsula and Isle Royale

John R. Halsey

AP 99

Explorers in the nineteenth century found many pits and tools along rich copper seams in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula–evidence that prehistoric inhabitants mined copper there for thousands of years. John Halsey, former state archaeologist of Michigan, tells the story of those who discovered the ancient mines in this thorough and engaging tale.

Coastal Ecosystems and Economic Strategies at Cerro Azul, Peru: The Study of a Late Intermediate Kingdom

Joyce Marcus

M 59

Cerro Azul, a pre-Inca fishing community in the Kingdom of Huarco, Peru, stood at the interface between a rich marine ecosystem and an irrigated coastal plain. Under the direction of its noble families, Cerro Azul dried millions of fish for shipment to inland communities, from which it received agricultural products and dried llama meat.

Caribou Hunting in the Upper Great Lakes: Archaeological, Ethnographic, and Paleoenvironmental Perspectives

Elizabeth Sonnenburg, Ashley K. Lemke, John M. O’Shea

M 57

Bringing together American and Canadian scholars of Great Lakes prehistory to provide a holistic picture of caribou hunters, this volume covers such diverse topics as paleoenvironmental reconstruction, ethnographic surveys of hunting features with Native informants in Canada, and underwater archaeological research, and presents a synthetic model of ancient caribou hunters in the Great Lakes region.

Domestic Life in Prehispanic Capitals: A Study of Specialization, Hierarchy, and Ethnicity

Linda R. Manzanilla, Claude Chapdelaine

M 46

With major differences in size, urban plans, and population density, the capitals of New World states had large heterogeneous societies, sometimes multiethnic and highly specialized, making these cities amazing backdrops for complex interactions.

The Moccasin Bluff Site and the Woodland Cultures of Southwestern Michigan

Robert Louis Bettarel and Hale G. Smith

AP 49

The Moccasin Bluff site is in Berrien County, Michigan, on the banks of the St. Joseph River. A railroad and highway destroyed part of this site, but much remained and was excavated by a crew from the University of Michigan in 1948.
The crew, under the direction of Hale G. Smith, found many features, including pits and burials, and thousands of artifacts. This report contains detailed descriptions and analyses of the site’s stone tools, ceramics, bone artifacts, charcoal, and faunal remains. Based on these findings and comparison with other regional sites, the authors conclude that the Moccasin Bluff site was inhabited for roughly 8,000 years, from the Archaic period to the time of European contact.