Iron Man versus Titanium Man (2008)


Iron Man versus Titanium Man (2008)
by Steve Rude (1956-)
11 x 14 in., ink, marker and watercolor on paper
Coppola Collection

I was in graduate school at UW-Madison (1978-82) when Madison natives Steve Rude and writer Mike Baron first published Nexus (1981). The local, Capital City imprint did not last long, and Nexus moved to Dark Horse Comics.

Rude’s interpretation of the Marvel Heroes looks straight out of the early 1960s, which is a good thing.

The original Titanium Man first appeared in Tales of Suspense #68 in 1965, as an Iron Man villain, and was created by Don Heck and Stan Lee.

“Boy Heroes” #1 (unpublished) p 17 (1946)


“Boy Heroes” #1 (unpublished) p 17 (1946)
by Ernie Schroeder (1916-2008)
14 x 23 in., ink on paper
Coppola Collection

The “Boy Heroes” appeared in All-New Comics 6-12, 15 (maybe; I have not seen this issue), plus Humphrey Comics 4, and (according to Frank Johnson and John Morrow, Kirby Collector #7, Oct 1995, pp 146-7) a 1946 story that was scheduled for a stand-alone Boys Heroes #1, planned at Harvey Comics, that was never published.

I’ve got 8 of the 9 pages from the origin story (All-New Comics 6), and 4 of the pages from this unpublished story. The art if attributed to Ernie Schroeder, whose earliest attributed comics work is a story that appears in All-New #7.

The four pages in this set (see page 45 for the best scan of the page label) are marked “Issue #1” and “Mag: Boy Heroes” with a number over white-out in each case. You can see this was originally scheduled for All-New). Six other pages have appeared in auctions since 2006, possibly coming from Schroeder’s estate.

The comic features the Boy Heroes characters, and it is set during WW2 as the boys are tangling with the crew on a Japanese submarine.

Happy to learn anything else about this story.

 

The Thing (2009)

The Thing (2009)
by Steve Rude (1956-)
11 x 14 in., ink, marker and watercolor on paper
Coppola Collection

I was in graduate school at UW-Madison (1978-82) when Madison natives Steve Rude and writer Mike Baron first published Nexus (1981). The local, Capital City imprint did not last long, and Nexus moved to Dark Horse Comics.

Rude’s interpretation of the Marvel Heroes looks straight out of the early 1960s, which is a good thing.

The Thing first appeared in Fantastic Four #1 in 1961, created by Jack Kirby and Stan Lee. The modular “Flying Bathtub” version of the FF’s fantasticar first appeared on the cover of FF #3.

“One Rings While the Other Tolls”


“One Rings While the Other Tolls” (July 4, 1944)
by Daniel Sanborn Bishop (1900-1959)
15 x 17 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Bishop studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. After graduating, Bishop joined the Oregon Journal as its editorial cartoonist in 1920 and then moved to the St. Louis Star Times in 1925. He played the trumpet in his spare time and was a member of the Portland Symphony Orchestra.

Following the D-Day invasion of June 1944, the Allies broke out of Normandy and advanced rapidly across France and Belgium. Hitler aimed to halt them by a surprise Blitzkrieg. Several armored divisions massed in the Ardennes with the goal of breaking through Allied lines. American forces held on stubbornly in spite of heavy casualties— more than 19,000 died. The Germans had limited supplies and could only fight for few days to before fuel and ammunition ran out, so the offensive soon ran out of steam. Allied lines “bulged” but did not break, and hundreds of thousands of reinforcements poured into the area. Afterwards, Germany lacked resources for another offensive and the end was inevitable.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 8


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 8
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 12


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 12
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 15


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 15
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 16


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 16
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 13


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 13
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Pogo” (March 5, 1955)


“Pogo” (March 5, 1955)
by Walter Crawford “Walt” Kelly, Jr (1913-1973)
6 x 17.5 in., ink on paper
Coppola Collection

He began his animation career in 1936 at Walt Disney Studios, contributing to Pinocchio, Fantasia, and Dumbo. In 1941, at the age of 28, Kelly transferred to work at Dell Comics, where he created Pogo, which eventually became his platform for political and philosophical commentary.

As a chemist, the last panel on this one is worth twice the price of admission. The classic Organic Chemistry textbook by Morrison and Boyd used a Donald Duck panel where Donald is talking chemical gibberish to his nephews. I want to incorporate this panel into a book I am doing, particularly because the chemistry is sensible.