“One Rings While the Other Tolls”


“One Rings While the Other Tolls” (July 4, 1944)
by Daniel Sanborn Bishop (1900-1959)
15 x 17 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Bishop studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. After graduating, Bishop joined the Oregon Journal as its editorial cartoonist in 1920 and then moved to the St. Louis Star Times in 1925. He played the trumpet in his spare time and was a member of the Portland Symphony Orchestra.

Following the D-Day invasion of June 1944, the Allies broke out of Normandy and advanced rapidly across France and Belgium. Hitler aimed to halt them by a surprise Blitzkrieg. Several armored divisions massed in the Ardennes with the goal of breaking through Allied lines. American forces held on stubbornly in spite of heavy casualties— more than 19,000 died. The Germans had limited supplies and could only fight for few days to before fuel and ammunition ran out, so the offensive soon ran out of steam. Allied lines “bulged” but did not break, and hundreds of thousands of reinforcements poured into the area. Afterwards, Germany lacked resources for another offensive and the end was inevitable.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 8


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 8
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 12


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 12
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 15


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 15
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 16


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 16
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 13


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 13
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Pogo” (March 5, 1955)


“Pogo” (March 5, 1955)
by Walter Crawford “Walt” Kelly, Jr (1913-1973)
6 x 17.5 in., ink on paper
Coppola Collection

He began his animation career in 1936 at Walt Disney Studios, contributing to Pinocchio, Fantasia, and Dumbo. In 1941, at the age of 28, Kelly transferred to work at Dell Comics, where he created Pogo, which eventually became his platform for political and philosophical commentary.

As a chemist, the last panel on this one is worth twice the price of admission. The classic Organic Chemistry textbook by Morrison and Boyd used a Donald Duck panel where Donald is talking chemical gibberish to his nephews. I want to incorporate this panel into a book I am doing, particularly because the chemistry is sensible.

“Amelia Rules, Cerebus Governs (reconsiders?)”


“Amelia Rules, Cerebus Governs (reconsiders?)” (August 12, 2011)
by Jimmy Gownley (1972-) and Dave Sim (1956-)
11 x 17 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Gownley is a comic book writer/artist best known for his award winning comic book “Amelia Rules!”

Dave Sim is the writer/artist known for “Cerebus,” the stupendous 300-issue graphic novel, produced and self-published by Sim over a 25 year period.

In 2011, during the run of the YouTube series “CerebusTV,” Gowley and Sim collaborated on a jam piece that was to be auctioned. As it turns out, Gownley is the one who picked up the piece rather than having it go to auction, the value of it having been set (as Jimmy recalls it) by the person who ran CerebusTV. From the episode summaries:

June 17, 2011 (S02E34): Jimmy Gownley’s half of the Cerebus/Amelia Rules! jam piece, Sim compares Jimmy’s roughed-in Cerebus dialogue to his own

August 12, 2011 (S02E40): “Amelia Rules, Cerebus Governs (reconsiders?)” jam print completion announcement

And here it is. A copy of the proof print that it produced in advance of the S/N editions is included as an additional image.

“Pogo” (May 18, 1955)

“Pogo” (May 18, 1955)
by Walter Crawford “Walt” Kelly, Jr (1913-1973)
6.75 x 20 in., ink on paper
Coppola Collection

He began his animation career in 1936 at Walt Disney Studios, contributing to Pinocchio, Fantasia, and Dumbo. In 1941, at the age of 28, Kelly transferred to work at Dell Comics, where he created Pogo, which eventually became his platform for political and philosophical commentary.

Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro were both communist leaders during the Cold War. Occasionally, they would take trips to America to extol Communism’s virtues. Some thought that their appearance in Pogo would provoke conflict.

Kelly satirized these trips three times in Pogo. The first time, a pig who bore a resemblance to Khrushchev and a parrot who said “you said it” whenever the pig said something. The second time, the pig came with a goat who was a parody of Fidel Castro. Castro had recently taken power in Cuba in the late 1950s and early ’60s when these strips were written. Many newspapers thought this was going to provoke nuclear war with Russia, and some papers dropped the strip.  Ironically, this strip is from just months before the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Soviet Embassy complained. The Post Hall Syndicate did not drop the strip, and Kelly continued the satire until it was played out.

Kelly also poked fun of the practice popularized by US supermarket chain Sperry & Hutchinson (“S&H”) of giving out bonus stamps with each purchase. These green stamps could later be traded for household goods of all kind, giving customers the (false) idea of getting something for nothing, while at the same time making them spend more.

Kelly’s “Puce Stamps” were an obvious scam, promoted by Mr. Pig (the barely disguised caricature of Nikita Kruschev) and aimed at abusing the naivity of the denizens of the Okefenokee Swamp.

In real life, a set of nine Puce Stamps, featuring the main characters of the Pogo strip, was created in 1963, and included by publishers Simon & Schuster with the first edition of the Pogo compilation, “The Puce Stamp Catalog.” I have two sets.

“Pogo” (May 24, 1962)

“Pogo” (May 24, 1962)
by Walter Crawford “Walt” Kelly, Jr (1913-1973)
6.75 x 20 in., ink on paper
Coppola Collection

He began his animation career in 1936 at Walt Disney Studios, contributing to Pinocchio, Fantasia, and Dumbo. In 1941, at the age of 28, Kelly transferred to work at Dell Comics, where he created Pogo, which eventually became his platform for political and philosophical commentary.

Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro were both communist leaders during the Cold War. Occasionally, they would take trips to America to extol Communism’s virtues. Some thought that their appearance in Pogo would provoke conflict.

Kelly satirized these trips three times in Pogo. The first time, a pig who bore a resemblance to Khrushchev and a parrot who said “you said it” whenever the pig said something. The second time, the pig came with a goat who was a parody of Fidel Castro. Castro had recently taken power in Cuba in the late 1950s and early ’60s when these strips were written. Many newspapers thought this was going to provoke nuclear war with Russia, and some papers dropped the strip.  Ironically, this strip is from just months before the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Soviet Embassy complained. The Post Hall Syndicate did not drop the strip, and Kelly continued the satire until it was played out.

Kelly also poked fun of the practice popularized by US supermarket chain Sperry & Hutchinson (“S&H”) of giving out bonus stamps with each purchase. These green stamps could later be traded for household goods of all kind, giving customers the (false) idea of getting something for nothing, while at the same time making them spend more.

Kelly’s “Puce Stamps” were an obvious scam, promoted by Mr. Pig (the barely disguised caricature of Nikita Kruschev) and aimed at abusing the naivity of the denizens of the Okefenokee Swamp.

In real life, a set of nine Puce Stamps, featuring the main characters of the Pogo strip, was created in 1963, and included by publishers Simon & Schuster with the first edition of the Pogo compilation, “The Puce Stamp Catalog.” I have two sets.