“Zap!” (April 29, 1984)


“Zap!” (April 29, 1984)
by Charles Phillip Bissell (1926 -)
10 x 15, ink and wash on board with color overlays
Coppola Collection

In 1960, Boston Globe cartoonist Phil Bissell, working for $25 a day, was handed an assignment that would change his life—and the lives of fans of the brand-new AFL football team coming to Boston. “Sports editor Jerry Nason came to me and he said, ‘They’ve decided to call the team the Boston Patriots. You better have a cartoon ready for tomorrow’s edition.’” Bissel’s “Pat Patriot” cartoon was the Patriot’s logo from 1961-1992.

The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) was a proposed missile defense system intended to protect the United States from attack by ballistic strategic nuclear weapons (intercontinental ballistic missiles and submarine-launched ballistic missiles). The concept was first announced publicly by President Ronald Reagan on March 23, 1983.

The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) was established in April, 1984. James Abrahamson, a NASA Administrator, was appointed as the first SDIO Director on April 15.

Now we have a “Space Force.”

“Ladies Day” (July 15, 1952)


“Ladies Day” (July 15, 1952)
by Burris A. Jenkins, Jr. (1897-1966)
14 x 20, ink and wash on board
Coppola Collection

Burris Jenkins Jr. was the son of a prominent Kansas City minister, war correspondent and newspaper editor. Jenkins Jr. was a popular sports cartoonist, whose work appeared in the New York Journal-American from 1931. His humorous published verses were also popular. Although best known for his sports themes, Jenkins was also a skilled courtroom illustrator and editorial cartoonist.

Jenkins was not afraid to provoke, and he has some strong WW2 examples, including one of the rare direct commentaries on concentration (death) camps. Among his best-remembered cartoons are his angry piece on the discovery of the dead Lindbergh baby, and his sentimental image of Babe Ruth’s farewell to Yankee Stadium.

He was fired from his first job at the Kansas City Post for a series of pessimistic Christmas cartoons, a firing that prompted his father’s resignation from the same newspaper.

His father was an interesting guy. Jenkins, Sr (1968-1945) was ordained in 1891 and served as a pastor in Indianapolis. He received advanced degrees from Harvard and went on to serve as a professor and president of the University of Indianapolis and president of Kentucky University. He left Kentucky to return to Kansas City as pastor of the Linwood Boulevard Christian Church. The church burned in 1939, and Jenkins chose Frank Lloyd Wright as the architect for the church’s new home overlooking the Country Club Plaza.

Jenkins served as editor of the Kansas City Post from 1919 to 1921, hoping to fight for the establishment of the League of Nations. The Jenkins, Sr., biography tells the story about his leaving the Post slightly differently that for the son: “After two years, it became necessary for him to choose between the newspaper and his pulpit and, without hesitation, he resigned from the Post.”

“Live dangerously!” Jenkins would thunder from the pulpit, embracing his own philosophy against all adversaries. Unconventional in nearly every aspect of his chosen field, Jenkins often preached from non-Biblical texts, such as the latest book or his travels abroad. The church frequently hosted motion pictures, dances, card games, and fundraising boxing matches. These activities led to opposition to Jenkins and his Community Church from other churches in the city.

The concept of a “Ladies Day” at traditionally male dominated events, particularly sporting events, was widespread in the post-WW2 era, as the rise in numbers of women as independent consumers grew.

From the 1920s through the 1950s, older women were members of a generation that still sometimes associated the prerogative of voting with male citizenship. Prior to 1920, anti-suffrage groups had drawn both men and women to their ranks in an effort to “protect the home.” Thus, it is not surprising that (especially) some older women did not choose to vote once the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified.

Women were slow to use their new voting privilege. This is typical of any newly enfranchised group.

Of the 1952 election, Louis Harris commented: “It raises the real possibility that in the future there will be a ‘woman’s vote’ quite separate from the men’s”

The Eisenhower campaign was one of the first presidential campaigns to make a major, concerted effort to win the female vote. Many of his radio and television commercials discussed topics such as education, inflation, ending the war in Korea, and other issues that were thought to appeal to women. The Eisenhower campaign made extensive use of female campaign workers. These workers made phone calls to likely Eisenhower voters, distributed “Ike” buttons and leaflets, and threw parties to build support for the GOP ticket in their neighborhoods. On election day, Eisenhower won a solid majority of the female vote.

Eisenhower campaigned by attacking “Korea, Communism, and Corruption”—that is, what the Republicans regarded as the failures of the outgoing Truman administration to deal with these issues.

Here, following the Republican Convention of 1952, a emerging notion of “Ladies Day” in a voting bloc, even if the oh-so-stereotypical “uprising housewife,” angry with men and going after them with her rolling pin, is still the prevailing image.

 

“Deficit Saloon” (September 5, 1984)


“Deficit Saloon” (September 5, 1984)
by Charles Phillip Bissell (1926 -)
11.5 x 17.5, ink and wash on board
Coppola Collection

In 1960, Boston Globe cartoonist Phil Bissell, working for $25 a day, was handed an assignment that would change his life—and the lives of fans of the brand-new AFL football team coming to Boston. “Sports editor Jerry Nason came to me and he said, ‘They’ve decided to call the team the Boston Patriots. You better have a cartoon ready for tomorrow’s edition.’” Bissel’s “Pat Patriot” cartoon was the Patriot’s logo from 1961-1992.

Remarks and a Question-and-Answer Session held by Ronald Reagan at the “Choosing a Future” Conference in Chicago, Illinois (September 5, 1984):

“From day one, the driving force behind everything we’ve done in economic policy from reducing the growth of Federal spending, which soared over 17 percent in 1980 alone, to lowering tax rates and providing new incentives for business investment, to cutting back the jungle of regulations, to supporting stable monetary policies has been to put our future back in the people’s hands, so working Americans could… “

WAIT FOR IT

(and I quote)

“… make America great again.”

“Some Capsules Contain Poison”


“Some Capsules Contain Poison” (October 3, 1982)
by Charles Phillip Bissell (1926 -)
10.5 x 13.5, ink and wash on board
Coppola Collection

In 1960, Boston Globe cartoonist Phil Bissell, working for $25 a day, was handed an assignment that would change his life—and the lives of fans of the brand-new AFL football team coming to Boston. “Sports editor Jerry Nason came to me and he said, ‘They’ve decided to call the team the Boston Patriots. You better have a cartoon ready for tomorrow’s edition.’” Bissel’s “Pat Patriot” cartoon was the Patriot’s logo from 1961-1992.

On Sept. 29, 1982, three people died in the Chicago area after taking cyanide-laced Tylenol at the outset of a poisoning spree that would claim seven lives by Oct. 1. The case has never been solved.

Food and Drug Administration officials hypothesized that the killer bought Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules over the counter, injected cyanide into the red half of the capsules, resealed the bottles, and sneaked them back onto the shelves of drug and grocery stores. The Illinois attorney general, on the other hand, suspected a disgruntled employee on Tylenol’s factory line.

Without a suspect, public outrage could have fallen squarely on Tylenol — the nation’s leading painkiller. Instead, by quickly recalling all of its products from store shelves, a move that cost Johnson & Johnson millions of dollars, the company emerged as another victim of the crime and one that put customer safety above profit.

Hundreds of copycat attacks involving Tylenol, other over-the-counter medications, and other products also took place around the United States immediately following the Chicago deaths.

The incidents led to reforms in the packaging of over-the-counter substances and to federal anti-tampering laws.

“Handcuffing Violence”


“Handcuffing Violence” (January 16, 1982)
by Charles Phillip Bissell (1926 -)
10.5 x 13.5, ink and wash on board
Coppola Collection

In 1960, Boston Globe cartoonist Phil Bissell, working for $25 a day, was handed an assignment that would change his life—and the lives of fans of the brand-new AFL football team coming to Boston. “Sports editor Jerry Nason came to me and he said, ‘They’ve decided to call the team the Boston Patriots. You better have a cartoon ready for tomorrow’s edition.’” Bissel’s “Pat Patriot” cartoon was the Patriot’s logo from 1961-1992.

January 16, 1982

Philip Cline, a former busboy, was found guilty on this date of murder and arson in a blaze at the Las Vegas Hilton that killed eight persons and injured 200.

Cline, 24, was found guilty of eight counts of murder and one count of arson. He is still serving eight consecutive life sentences.

“Electric Chair… just retain the death penalty”


“Electric Chair… just retain the death penalty” (December 1, 1982)
by Charles Phillip Bissell (1926 -)
9 x 14, ink and wash on board
Coppola Collection

In 1960, Boston Globe cartoonist Phil Bissell, working for $25 a day, was handed an assignment that would change his life—and the lives of fans of the brand-new AFL football team coming to Boston. “Sports editor Jerry Nason came to me and he said, ‘They’ve decided to call the team the Boston Patriots. You better have a cartoon ready for tomorrow’s edition.’” Bissel’s “Pat Patriot” cartoon was the Patriot’s logo from 1961-1992.

December 1, 1982

On this date, the first person to be sentenced under Connecticut’s revised capital punishment law was spared the death penalty and sentenced instead to life in prison. The convicted killer, John McGann, was convicted for the murder for hire of a man in 1981.

Under the new law, a “life sentence” is 60 years in prison with chance of release after 35 years.

Through various appeals, the case became noteworthy because intent on the part of McGann could not be established, and a retrial and conviction for conspiracy also ended up being reversed under a Double Jeopardy argument in 1990.

“Under Paid is Right”


“Under Paid is Right” (December 16, 1941)
by Will B Johnstone (1881-1944)
11 x 22 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Johnstone studied at the Chicago Art Institute, after which he became an artist with the Chicago Interocean. He illustrated the daily news events, and Johnstone was the first person to diagram football games showing every play for each team. He eventually moved to New York City, where he began doing illustrations for William Randolph Hearst’s newspapers. Later on, he moved to The World, which was later renamed to The New York World-Telegram. He did a comic strip based on the news of the day. This feature had a recurring character that depicted a victimized tax payer. The man in question had been literally stripped down in the nude after paying his taxes and therefore walked around wearing nothing but a barrel. This has become a stock image in many humoristic cartoons and comics.

Johnstone and his brother were playwrights, and co-wrote ten musicals that were produced on Broadway. For his play, “I’ll Say She is,” he recruited Groucho Marx and then rewrote the play to bring in all the Marx brothers. Johnstone was a co-writer on “Monkey Business,” “Horse Feathers,” and “a Day at the Races.”

Before the direct involvement of US troops in WW2, privates in the US Army earned $21 a month. US soldiers were stationed in the Philippines in late 1940, in anticipation of US involvement in the war.  The day after Pearl Harbor, the Japanese made their first landings on Philippine soil, and the action in the Pacific Theater was underway. The first weeks were active, but the US soldiers were using old munitions and the supply lines began to be cut off.

Things moved fast. The main attack took place December 22, 1941, and by March, the Japanese had taken the main island and occupied Manila.

“An Idealist in a Realistic World”

“An Idealist in a Realistic World” (March 30, 1942)
by Will B Johnstone (1881-1944)
14 x 22 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Johnstone studied at the Chicago Art Institute, after which he became an artist with the Chicago Interocean. He illustrated the daily news events, and Johnstone was the first person to diagram football games showing every play for each team. He eventually moved to New York City, where he began doing illustrations for William Randolph Hearst’s newspapers. Later on, he moved to The World, which was later renamed to The New York World-Telegram. He did a comic strip based on the news of the day. This feature had a recurring character that depicted a victimized tax payer. The man in question had been literally stripped down in the nude after paying his taxes and therefore walked around wearing nothing but a barrel. This has become a stock image in many humoristic cartoons and comics.

Johnstone and his brother were playwrights, and co-wrote ten musicals that were produced on Broadway. For his play, “I’ll Say She is,” he recruited Groucho Marx and then rewrote the play to bring in all the Marx brothers. Johnstone was a co-writer on “Monkey Business,” “Horse Feathers,” and “a Day at the Races.”

This piece is also representative of Johnstone’s terrific panorama pieces.

A capsule view of WW2 appears across the hemisphere, along with the naïve engagement of the United States.

Highlights on the map:

The ghost ship SS Bremen, a steamer that used to move between NYC to Bremerhaven, was gutted by disgruntled crew members on March 16, 1942.

Danzig, annexed by Nazi Germany on September 2, 1939, during the invasion of Poland at the start of WW2.

The Italians breaking the treaty with Ethiopia, 1935-37.

The Austrian Anschluss, March 1938.

The Slovak Republic became a client state of Germany in March, 1939.

The fight with Russia was deeply engaged in late 1941 and early 1942.

You can see the liberal, commie sympathizers (the Parlor Pinks) abandoning ship.

In March 1942, the Pacific War was still dominated by the Japanese forces, and the fear of invasion and the ban on large public assembly was strongly in effect on the US west coast.

In fact, that year, on January 1, is the only time the Rose Bowl game was played anywhere other than in Pasadena.

“Hey Dad – When Do they Grow Out of their Cocoons?”


“Hey Dad – When Do they Grow Out of their Cocoons?” (December 23, 1981)
by Charles Phillip Bissell (1926 -)
12 x 13.5, ink and wash on board
Coppola Collection

In 1960, Boston Globe cartoonist Phil Bissell, working for $25 a day, was handed an assignment that would change his life—and the lives of fans of the brand-new AFL football team coming to Boston. “Sports editor Jerry Nason came to me and he said, ‘They’ve decided to call the team the Boston Patriots. You better have a cartoon ready for tomorrow’s edition.’” Bissel’s “Pat Patriot” cartoon was the Patriot’s logo from 1961-1992.

Happy Holidays.

“Army Worm!”

“Army Worm!” (June 25, 1941)
by Charles (Chuck) Werner (1909-1997)
11 x 15 in., ink on paper
Coppola Collection

Charles (Chuck) Werner won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning in 1939 for a cartoon he did for the Daily Oklahoman titled “Nomination for 1938” which allowed for the transfer of the Sudetenland to Hitler’s Germany (October 6, 1938). At age 29, Werner was the youngest person to win the Pulitzer. Werner left the Daily Oklahoman to be the Chief Editorial Cartoonist at the Chicago Sun in 1941 before leaving for the Indianapolis Star in 1947. Throughout his nearly sixty-year career, many U.S. Presidents expressed interest in Werner’s cartoons, including Lyndon B. Johnson and Harry Truman requesting cartoons for their presidential libraries.

In June 1941, WW2 took a sharp turn. There was war “worming” its way through Europe, through China, and through North Africa… and in 6 months, the US would be brought into it through the attack at Pearl Harbor.

On June 22, though, Hitler turned on Russia and took the gambit, in Operation Barbarossa, that he could take Moscow in a well structured, all out assault to the East.