Lab Member Bios

Dr. Edward C. Chang : Professor of Clinical Psychology

Dr. Edward C. Chang

Professor of Clinical Psychology

Edward C. Chang is Professor of Clinical Psychology and Social Work and a Faculty Associate in Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Chang received his B.A. in psychology and philosophy from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is a Fellow of the Asian American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. Dr. Chang completed his APA-accredited clinical internship at Bellevue Hospital Center-New York University Medical Center. He has served as chapter President of Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Society. Dr. Chang has served as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Personality Processes and Individual Differences, the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, and the Asian American Journal of Psychology, and is currently an Associate Editor of Cognitive Therapy and Research and the American Psychologist. Dr. Chang has published over a 100 works on optimism and pessimism, perfectionism, social problem solving, and cultural influences on behavior. He is the editor of nearly a dozen works, including the forthcoming Cognitive-Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Ethnic and Racial groups (American Psychological Association). Dr. Chang has been identified as one of the 70 "top producers" of scholarly works in clinical psychology, from a pool of 1,927 core clinical faculty from Ph.D. programs across the U.S. He was also selected for the Theodore Millon Award in Personality Psychology in 2012. His works have received wide media coverage, from The Chronicles of Higher Education to the Wall Street Journal.

Dr. Chang has taught a variety of courses over the years, including Introduction to Psychology, Personality Theory, Behavior Therapy, Race and Gender, Health Psychology, Advanced Research Lab in Psychopathology, and Adult Psychopathology. He has taught Introduction to Psychopathology each and every year since he was a graduate student. Dr. Chang has directly mentored one of the highest numbers of undergraduate students within the department. He was recognized for his many years of teaching excellence at the University of Michigan by being selected for the LSA Excellence in Education Award in 2008 and the University Undergraduate Teaching Award in 2011.

changec@umich.edu
Abigael Lucas : Graduate Student

Abigael Lucas

Graduate Student

Abigael Lucas is a recent graduate of the University of Michigan. She earned her B.A. in Psychology, with a minor in Gender and Health through the Women’s Studies Department. Abigael is a student in the University of Michigan's Accelerated Master's Degree Program (AMDP) in Psychology, where she is focusing her studies on Clinical Science. Abigael’s primary research interests lie in the impact of dynamic identities (e.g., gender, race, age, socioeconomic status) on mental and physical health outcomes, and the internal processes that mediate and external factors that moderate those associations in diverse adult populations. Given that she grew up in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, Abigael hopes to be able to better understand and service rural and other under-served communities through research. In her spare time, she enjoys volunteering within the community, being outdoors, and reading. Upon graduating from the AMDP with her M.S. in Psychology, Abigael plans to continue her education by pursing a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.

Harrison Angoff : Undergraduate Student

Harrison Angoff

Undergraduate Student

Harrison is a Junior majoring in Psychology and Arabic in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan. His main research interests lie in studying how various factors growing up, such as trauma experience affect academic achievement and hopes to apply his research to assist youth living in conflict stricken regions succeed in school. In his spare time, Harrison loves to cook, read, and play sports. Having grown up in the suburbs of New York City, he hopes to attend graduate school back home in either clinical or developmental psychology and looks forward to helping communities in need through his research.

Ashley Duong : Undergraduate Student

Ashley Duong

Undergraduate Student

Ashley Duong is a sophomore in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan. She is double majoring in International Security, Cooperations, and Norms along with Psychology with a minor in Southeast Asian Studies. Her main research interests lie in studying social cognition, human performance in extreme environments, and cross-cultural psychology. In her spare time, Ashley loves to play tennis, the guitar, and go to music festivals. She plans to continue her education in graduate school. She looks forward to advancing her academic and professional career in hopes of helping the community around her.

Mingqi Li : Undergraduate Student

Mingqi Li

Undergraduate Student

Mingqi is a senior student majoring in Psychology at Skidmore College in upstate New York. Her research interests center on understanding the symptoms, causes, and treatments of psychopathology and how psychopathology affects one’s quality of life. She has a specific interest in studying eating disorders; focusing on clarify the causes of eating disorders in diverse groups and understanding the personal and interpersonal consequences eating disorders in diverse groups. She is also interested in understanding the impact of the family environment on facilitating personal growth, performance (e.g., academic performance), and psychological adjustment in children. She enjoys reading and watching movies in her spare time and has a genuine curiosity in people. Mingqi plans to continue her education in Developmental or Clinical Psychology and pursue a PhD. She hopes to use her knowledge about science and research studies to help more people.