Projects

Project Resources

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PROJECTS (2019-20)

Graduate students who are interested in FFGSI positions should contact the project leader and discuss their participation in the project. In general, first-year graduate students are not encouraged to pursue these (you are busy enough, already, and your participation in work such as this will benefit from your having been a GSI in the program). The FFGSI application requires (a) a brief description of you participation, (b) a note of support from the project leader, and (c) a note of support from your research advisor.

Please feel free contact Professor Coppola if you have any questions.

LIST OF TITLES (summaries are given below)

1. Project: Living in the Anthropocene (Interdisciplinary Honors Program) Prof. Anne McNeil Develop course curriculum, design assignments, and identify reading materials.

2. Project: Chem 210 (Organic I Lecture) Prof. Alison Narayan Teaching Materials for GSIs in Introductory Organic Chemistry

3. Project: Chem 303 (Inorganic I Lecture) Prof. Vince Pecoraro Teaching Materials for CHEM 303: Integrating DuoLingo/tinycards

4.Project: Chem 130 (General Chemistry) Prof. Charles C. L. McCrory, New Discussion Section Peer-Learning Activities for Chem 130  (Winter 2020)

5. Project: Chem 130 (General Chemistry) Prof. Charles C. L. McCrory, New Course-Specific GSI training for Chem 130 (Fall 2019)

6. Project: CHEM 230 (Quiz/Homework Combo) Amy Gottfried To create a one-stop, integrated homework and quiz system for CHEM 230

7. Project: CHEM 230 (Pre-course refresher) Amy Gottfried To compile (using free on-line resources) a “refresher” for students who have not had general chemistry in multiple years.

8. Project: CHEM 216 (Organic Lab II) Prof. Ginger Shultz Student Engagement in Authentic Research Design.

9. Project: CHEM 260, 461, 463 (Physical Chemistry) Prof. Eitan Geva Development of interactive computer demos for undergraduate physical chemistry courses

10. Project: SMART Center outreach Prof. Nils Walter Developing outreach tools for the Single Molecule Analysis in Real-Time (SMART) Center.

11. Project: CHEM 125/126 (General Laboratory) Dr. A. Poniatowski General instructional development of new instructional materials for CHEM 125/126.

12. Project: CHEM 125/126 (General Laboratory) Prof. Kerri Pratt Incorporating Snow Chemistry Research into CHEM 125/126.

13. Project: CHEM 246/247 (Bioanalytical Chemistry) Prof. Brandon Ruotolo Introducing Native Mass Spectrometry to Undergraduates in a CHEM 246/247

14. Project on Academic Integrity Dr. Amy Gottfried Promoting a culture of academic integrity.

15. Project: Chem 262 (Mathematical Methods) Prof. Roseanne Sension Introducing symbolic & numerical “computer math” in chemistry

16. Project: Chem 242 (Analytical Chemistry) Prof. Kicki Hakansson Lab on a chip: Incorporating Microfluidics in Undergraduate Lab

17. Project: Chem 216 (Organic Laboratory II) Prof. John Wolfe Anticancer Drugs: Development of a Research Based Laboratory Section

18. Project: Chem 130 (General Chemistry) Dr. Carol Ann Castaneda, Atoms first curriculum pre/post data analysis

19. Project: Chem 646 (Chemical Separations)Prof. Brandon Ruotolo. Group Projects on Challenging Separations.

The following projects are not currently actively soliciting help, but if students are interested, please contact the faculty director for more information:

I. Project: Sustainable Polymers (MMSS Program) Prof. Anne McNeil Revise curriculum, develop and test new experiments for pre-college science program.

II. Project: CHEM 303 (Inorganic Chemistry I) Prof. Nicolai Lehnert Computationally-driven FMO metal-protein interactions

III. Project: CHEM 303 (Inorganic Chemistry I) Prof. Nicolai Lehnert Integrating Literature-based Assignments

IV. Project: CHEM 130 (General Chemistry) Dr. Carol Ann Castaneda, Profs. Julie Biteen, Bart Bartlett Atoms First CHEM 130 resources (NOT CURRENTLY AVAILABLE; see Dr. Castaneda for current project plans)

V. Project: CHEM 130 (General Chemistry- CSP) Dr. Carol Ann Castaneda CHEM 130 CSP (General Chemistry in the Comprehensive Studies Program) Problem-solving for CHEM 130 lecture. (NOT CURRENTLY AVAILABLE; see Dr. Castaneda for current project plans)

VI. Project: CHEM 260 (Physical Chemistry) Prof Dominika Zgid Demonstrations and In-Class Experiments for “Real World” chemistry

VII. Project: CHEM 225/226 (Physical Chemistry) Dr. Amy Gottfried Developing a New Laboratory Course to accompany CHEM 230

VIII. Project: CHEM 463 (Advanced Laboratory) Prof. Paul Zimmerman Sustainability Projects

IX. Project: Chem 454 (Biophysical Chemistry) Profs. Julie Biteen, A. Ramamoorthy Learning through the literature

LIST OF SUMMARIES

  1. Project: The Anthropocene (Interdisciplinary Honors Course) Prof. Anne McNeil Identify reading materials and develop reading prompts/learning objectives for each class and discussion. This interdisciplinary honors course focuses on human-induced changes to our planet. It was first taught in W19 and is scheduled for W20 and W21. The students read papers and book chapters covering a wide range of topics, from geology to climate change to politics to economics to the Clean Water Act. This FFGSI project is aimed at helping prune some duplicate readings and identify new readings as well as develop new reading prompts/quizzes for each class and discussion.
  2. Project: Chem 210 (Organic I Lecture) Prof. Alison Narayan Topic: Teaching Materials for GSIs in Introductory Organic Chemistry The primary focus of this FFGSI position is to develop teaching materials for the GSIs teaching discussion sections that can be used to provide a more consistent experience for the students across each discussion section. With GSI training and the right teaching tools, we can provide a more consistent and excellent teaching experience from one GSI to the next, which will serve our students all the better, regardless of which discussion section they choose. I also want to develop worksheets that can be given to the students, that help them build the confidence needed as they learn material throughout the course. I believe that if we can help the students feel confident about their knowledge and apply it on intermediate level problems, they will be more able and willing to work out the difficult, exam-style problems of the coursepack, which is their best bet at succeeding in the course. By providing some structure for GSIs and a conceptual stepping stone to those difficult coursepack problems, I think the students will get more out of their discussion sections and be much more willing to keep going. A second goal of this position is to foster communication among the cohort of 210 GSIs to share teaching strategies and clarify concepts.
  3. Project: Chem 303 (Organic I Lecture) Prof. Vince Pecoraro Teaching Materials for CHEM 303: Integrating DuoLingo/tinycards. My thought for this project is to provide a DuoLingo/tinycards approach to learning some of the material in 303. I would use tinycard exercises to build vocabulary for the subject and then DuoLingo type exercises to help then master some of the concepts. I would try to then give graded quizzes in the discussion section to evaluate their learning. The idea is for students to get feedback more rapidly on their understanding.
  4. Project: Chem 130 (General Chemistry) Prof. Charles C. L. McCrory, New Discussion Section Peer-Learning Activities for Chem 130  (Winter 2020) The purpose of this FFGSI is to develop a set of new peer-learning activities for Chem 130 discussion sections to better facilitate conceptual knowledge development among students.  These activities will build upon and adapt the current active-learning activities used in the course, but incorporate new variety into the curriculum.  The FFGSI will help develop 12 discussion topic-specific discussion activities adapted from published peer-learning exercises that have already been shown to increase conceptual knowledge among students.
  5. Project: Chem 130 (General Chemistry) Prof. Charles C. L. McCrory, New Course-Specific GSI training for Chem 130 (Fall 2019) The purpose of this FFGSI is to develop a training program specifically tailored for Chem 130 GSIs loosely modeled on the “Teaching Academy” for new faculty at the University of Michigan.  The FFGSI will help develop a one-day intensive training session focusing on the interconnection of content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge for specific Chem 130 course concepts.  In addition, the FFGSI will help to develop a series of short interactive training modules for eventual incorporation into weekly Chem 130 staff meetings.
  6. Project: CHEM 230 (Quiz/Homework Combo) Amy Gottfried Now that CHEM 230 is a flipped classroom, students watch lecture content before coming to class. To check their comprehension, students take a short Canvas quiz and do a few homework problems. The quiz questions are delivered through Canvas and the homework problems come through Sapling.  The goal of this project is to streamline the process and get all questions into a single format/system: minimizing the questions and maximizing the results.
  7. Project: CHEM 230 (Pre-course refresher) Amy Gottfried Students arrive in CHEM 230 with different general chemistry backgrounds (high chemistry + high placement exam score; AP or IB Chemistry; CHEM 125, 126, and 130.) To goal of this project is to compile (using free on-line resources) a “refresher” for students who have not had general chemistry in multiple years.
  8. Project: CHEM 216 (Organic Laboratory II) Prof. Ginger Shultz Topic: Student Engagement in Authentic Research Design In this project traditional procedural laboratory experiments were refocused around authentic research problems that are routinely encountered by practicing synthetic chemists. Students work together in small groups to brainstorm solutions to the synthetic problems, to implement their solutions in lab, and to use data to determine if their solution is viable. The refocused curriculum is student-centered because students decide what they need to know in order to solve the problem and pursue their own solutions. The curriculum is now operating in Chemistry 216. Ongoing aspects of the project are 1) investigation of student engagement with problem based curriculum using discourse analysis and 2) investigation of graduate student development of teaching experience in a problem-based context.
  9. Project: CHEM 260, 461, 463 (Physical Chemistry) Prof. Eitan Geva Development of interactive computer demos for undergraduate physical chemistry courses Chem260/230 Compute-to-Learn (C2L) Honors Studio. A new pedagogy, called Compute-to-Learn (C2L), is being implemented within the framework of a supplemental, peer-led weekly 2 hour session, in a studio environment, where undergraduate students enrolled in introductory Physical Chemistry courses (Chem260 and Chem230) collaborate to create interactive computer demonstrations of basic Physical Chemistry concepts, using Wolfram Mathematica (a powerful computing environment commonly used in academia, industry, and education). The C2L pedagogy emphasizes action-based learning activities designed to promote students’ integration of new idea, within a collaborative apprenticeship environment that mimics the authentic experience of how science is done in real life. Senior undergraduate students who participated in a previous iteration of the studio serve as peer leaders whose role is to guide activities and help the students stay on track towards completing the project within the 13-week semester. The FFGSIs assigned to this project will be charged with further development of the pedagogy and assessment tools of its impact on students learning and outlook, as well as training, supervising and mentoring the undergraduate peer leaders and coordinating studio activities.”
  10. Project: SMART Center outreach Prof. Nils Walter Topic: Developing outreach tools for the Single Molecule Analysis in Real-Time (SMART) Center There is an urgent need to capitalize on the recent successes of single molecule and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, as underscored by the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to three founders of the field with ties to the U-M. Starting in 2010, the U-M invested in this leading-edge research area through support of a successful NSF Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) application that seeded the Single Molecule Analysis in Real- Time (SMART) Center, housed in Chemistry and Biophysics but open to all users across the entire U-M. Both research groups already versed in single molecule analysis and those that never before experienced them ― but appreciate their broad impact equally on the basic and applied sciences from systems biology to materials design ― using with increasing success the SMART Center’s currently five single molecule and super-resolution microscopes. To enhance outreach across campus and beyond, three types of activities need to be developed: (1) hands-on demonstrations of assays that users developed on the SMART Center microscopes, to be integrated as modules into existing undergraduate and graduate courses at the U-M such as Chem 352, Biophys 450, and Biophys 521; (2) a “Single Molecule Roadshow” to bring mobile hands-on experimentation to inner-city high schools in the Detroit school district with large underrepresented groups, Ann Arbor’s Hands-on Museum, and Detroit’s Science Center; and (3) web-based information and activities to introduce the concepts of single molecule research. In combination, we expect these efforts to provide for the kind of stimulating intellectual immersion that is known to foster innovation and the ‘eureka’ effect in young minds.
  11. Project: CHEM 125/126 (General Laboratory) Dr. A. Poniatowski Topic:General instructional development of new instructional materials for CHEM 125/126. Our goal for the Chemistry 125/126 lab course is to move towards a classroom structure centered on a research context from the traditional chemical sub-disciplines that are of interest to our students. One example is a project focused on a biomedical theme: We have focused on incorporating direct application of original scientific research to the course, focusing first on the biomedical/biochemical research field. During the fall semester, we formulated 2 objectives: 1) developing experimental procedures with direct application to the biological and biomedical field and 2) creating presentation/discussion questions (denoted as team demonstration questions) for each experiment currently on the syllabus that have applications to biomedical research.
  12. Project: CHEM 125/126 (General Laboratory) Prof. Kerri Pratt Topic: Incorporating Snow Chemistry Research into CHEM 125/126. Our goal is to develop two sections of the Chemistry 125/126 lab course based on original snow chemistry research, focused on understanding implications of Arctic sea ice loss and the application of road salts in the wintertime in the mid-latitudes. Course development will include designing and implementing experiments, creating lab worksheets and other class materials. The overall goal of the course is to expose students to original research to develop critical thinking, writing, and presentation skills.
  13. Project: CHEM 246/247 (Bioanalytical Chemistry) Prof. Brandon Ruotolo Topic: Introducing Native Mass Spectrometry to Undergraduates in a CHEM 246/247 Native mass spectrometry has become an increasingly important tool in science-related fields, especially when combined with electrospray ionization (ESI). However, many undergraduate students are ill-prepared to use this type of instrumentation that is now required by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies world-wide. In this project, two workflows for ESI-MS experiments that explore protein- protein and protein-ligand interactions in a biochemical analysis laboratory will expose undergraduate students to principles of protein systems and mass spectrometry.
  14. Project on Academic Integrity Dr. Amy Gottfried Topic: Promoting a culture of academic integrity. Allegations of cheating on a (chemistry) final exam were made against a student whose “wandering eyes” were captured on a cell phone video. The judicial process and appeal shed light on many valuable lessons. The goal of this project would be to explore student, faculty, and GSI rights and responsibilities in promoting and maintaining academic integrity; to gather data on how exams are proctored across campus; to open a dialogue about proctoring to evaluate any benefits in making the process more uniform; and to formulate an educational campaign for GSIs and faculty on these findings.
  15. Project: Chem 262 (Mathematical Methods) Prof. Roseanne Sension Topic: Introducing symbolic & numerical “computer math” in chemistry This project will use the Matlab (Mathworks) interface to develop 6-12 exercises for Chem 262. The course has 12 weekly homework assignments and the goal will be to add one computer based exercise to each assignment. These exercises will integrate into homework problems and allow the students to dig deeper. The number of exercises developed for Winter ’16 will depend on the amount of time required to develop and test each exercise. A minimum effort of 10 hours per exercise is anticipated to design and implement productive exercises based on Prof. Sension’s experience designing and implementing the MathCad curriculum for Chem 462.
  16. Project: Chem 242 (Analytical Chemistry) Prof. Kicki Hakansson Topic: Lab on a chip: Incorporating Microfluidics in Undergraduate Lab Polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS) is a common material used to fabricate microfluidic channels and chips, using soft lithography techniques. The three main steps in this process include rapid prototyping, replica molding and sealing. Depending on the number of chips required, this process could be very time consuming and tedious. With 3-D printing, the fabrication time is greatly reduced as a single machine does the process. Additionally, use of a 3-D printer is more reproducible as the device fabrication is done by single engineering drawing software. We previously described a novel experiment, which uses an Agar-based microfluidic device (manuscript in preparation) to quantify salicylate concentration. Here, we propose to use 3-D printed microfluidic devices, an approach which will potentially improve data quality by removing artificial defects that arise from the Agar-based workflow. Using the 3- D printed microfluidic device, we will explore fundamentals of laminar vs. turbulent flows by altering chip geometries (i.e. Y-channel and zigzag geometries) and fluid viscosities (methanol vs. water) to promote mixing. Once mixing is achieved, the reaction of iron (III) and salicylate will be observed in order to construct a calibration curve for the determination of salicylate concentration. When iron (III) and salicylate reacts, they form a purple solution. The degree of purple will be probed using image analysis software. Finally, the image analysis will be compared to spectrophotometric determination from a previous experiment.
  17. Project: Chem 216 (Organic Laboratory II) Prof. John Wolfe Topic: Anticancer Drugs: Development of a Research Based Laboratory Section Beginning Winter term 2018, a new research-based laboratory section of CHEM 216 will be offered. The course will be co-instructed by Prof. Wolfe and Prof. Matt Soellner, and will be centered on the synthesis of analogs of a new compound with anticancer activity that has been developed in the Soellner group. FFGSI duties will be focused on the development of the curriculum for this new course, and will involve planning the structure of the course, developing and troubleshooting the experiments, developing, writing, and editing procedures for the experiments, developing materials for the lecture portion of the course, and other tasks associated with the design, planning, and execution of the class.
  18. Project: Chem 130 (General Chemistry) Dr. Carol Ann Castaneda, Atoms first curriculum pre/post data analysis. Atoms-first general chemistry is a popular curricular reform in the chemistry education community. Unfortunately, there is not a strong literature base as to the benefit of this curriculum to students’ learning. A few years ago, a version of an atoms-first curriculum was adopted for the CHEM 130 course in our department. We hypothesize that the atoms-first approach to general chemistry helps increase student understanding specifically around the nature of chemical bonding. To test this hypothesis we probed student understanding of the nature of chemical bonding using selections from the Bonding Representation Inventory (J. Chem. Educ. 2014, 91(3), 312-320) as a pre & post test with CHEM 130 students before and after the implementation of the new curriculum. The questions targeted student misconceptions related to electrostatic interactions in bonding, specifically transferring electrons and attractions, and were administered during normal lecture meetings. Preliminary data analysis for much of the data is completed, with a detailed plan moving forward. An FFGSI on this project will run the statistical analysis of the data, discuss and write-up conclusions, and ideally collaborate on a manuscript.
  19. Project: Chem 646 (Chemical Separations) Prof. Brandon Ruotolo. Group Projects on Challenging Separations. The purpose of the FFGSI position will be to design and implement group projects for students in 646. There are many examples of “real-world” analytes that are difficult to separate such as glycans, lipids, and chemical pollutants, among others. These group projects will require students to research a set of these analytes and the current approaches for separating them. Groups will then present across multiple class days on different facets of their analytes including their relevance, why they are difficult to separate, and current state of the art approaches for separating and analyzing them. The role of the FFGSI will be finding suitable analytes for the project topics and then developing a unique set of probing questions/requirements for each topic. The FFGSI will also create rubrics for the projects, and pre- and post-surveys related to the group projects and course overall.

The following projects are not currently actively soliciting help, but if students are interested, please contact the faculty director for more information:

  1. Project: CHEM 211 (Organic Laboratory I) Prof. Anne J. McNeil Topic: Creating REAL (Research Experiences in Authentic Laboratories) Science Students often cite uninspiring introductory courses as a reason for leaving the STEM fields. At the University of Michigan (UM), we teach an introductory organic chemistry lab to approximately 2000 first- year students per academic year. We therefore have an extraordinary opportunity to nurture and/or transform how these students view science. Teaching organic chemistry to first semester first-year students, a tradition at Michigan since 1989, has led to the exceptional challenge that most students enrolled in the corresponding introductory laboratory course have no prior lab experience. Over the past two years, we have completely overhauled this course into an active- learning adventure for the undergraduate students. We would like to make improvements to this existing curriculum. In addition, to keep the labs fresh, we imagine a suite of new labs that could rotate in. We are therefore looking for a FFGSI to help revise existing materials and develop additional lab modules for the CHEM 211 curriculum
  2. Project: CHEM 260 (Physical Chemistry) Prof. Dominika Zgid Topic: Demonstrations and In-Class Experiments for “Real World” chemistry The project will develop demonstrations and experiments to be performed during lecture that will illustrate concepts from the suite of physical chemistry courses. The purpose of the demonstrations will be to help students visualize challenging concepts and connect them with “the real world.”
  3. Project: CHEM 225/226 (Physical Chemistry) Dr. Amy Gottfried Topic: Developing a New Laboratory Course to accompany CHEM 230 Currently CHEM 125/126 accompanies the CHEM 130 lecture course and there is no laboratory course affiliated with CHEM 230. What would a 200-level general chemistry lab course (CHEM 225/226) look like? How would the course serve students not just in increasing their knowledge and their skills but along their academic career path (or what students would the course be targeted to?)
  4. Project: CHEM 463 (Advanced Laboratory) Prof. Paul Zimmerman Topic: Sustainability Projects Chem 463 exposes students to fundamental principles of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Although the models presented in such courses are simple, they are powerful enough to provide insight into problems of climate change, sustainable energy, and other challenges faced by modern society. In lieu of traditional discussion sections, students are trained in these concepts and apply this knowledge to their own sustainability projects. The projects, which include a paper and an oral presentation, require that students present a model for understanding or predicting the behavior of a challenging contemporary problem in sustainability. Students’ perceptions of sustainability are evaluated both at the beginning and end of the course to determine how the projects impact their views.
  5. Project: Chem 454 (Biophysical Chemistry) Prof. Julie Biteen Prof. A. Ramamoorthy Topic: Learning through the literature In Chemistry 454, students learn about the modern techniques that are used to characterize the structure and dynamics of biological molecules. In order to deepen the students’ understanding of these approaches in the context of real-world applications, we will develop a set of readings from the current literature. The FFGSI will need to select recent, high-impact publications, which are exciting while understandable to a junior-level undergraduate. Furthermore, the selection will need to span the topics covered in the course. The FFGSI will also create a rubric for evaluating student comprehension of the literature.

ARCHIVE OF PAST PROJECTS (RETIRED, but can be used to inspire new ideas)

  1. Project: SAPLING LEARNING in Organic Chemistry Prof. Anne J. McNeil Prof. Brian P. Coppola Topic: Student- generated instructional material as an online resource for introductory organic chemistry courses Students entering the first-year organic chemistry courses at the University of Michigan come from a variety of educational backgrounds. Due to this, instructors devote significant amount of the course to basic skill development. Some of this work could be moved online which would enable faculty to introduce additional material, including more advanced topics, in lecture. To design the new online resource, we engaged students enrolled in special courses (CHEM 219/220) to construct, review and edit questions that would be incorporated into a feedback-driven online learning environment, Sapling Learning. A set number of topics were identified that were important to doing well in each course, including arrow pushing, resonance, and acid/base chemistry for CHEM 210 and acetal, acylation, and enolate/enol chemistry for CHEM 215. To date 600+ questions have been generated for CHEM 210 on 10 different skill-based topics. Each question contains specific feedback and explanations to guide the students in understanding the underlying concepts. In the Fall 2014 semester, those 600+ questions have been made available to students taking CHEM 210 and analysis of effectiveness of the resource, is currently underway. The CHEM 215 resource is being developed over the Fall 2014/Winter 2015 semesters and is projected to be launched in the Fall of 2015.
  2. Project: CHEM 242 (Analytical Chemistry) Prof. K Hakansson Topic:Modeling microfluidics Novel laboratory activity centered on modeling microfluidic cells.
  3. Project: CHEM 352 (Biochemistry Laboratory) Dr. Kathleen Nolta Topic:Incorporating Inquiry-driven Experimentation in Undergraduate Biochemical Laboratories The undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course at the University of Michigan has historically utilized weekly experiments that focus on technique exposure for students. This approach introduces undergraduates to methods that are common and necessary in research laboratories, but students often fail to develop an ability to apply the concepts behind these techniques in alternative situations. Dr. Nolta is interested in working with students to help develop new ideas. Summary: MODULE 1 (James Carolan) In order to build greater cognitive control over the meaning behind student actions in this laboratory class, we have worked to develop a module as part of the syllabus that centers on an investigative design while still presenting students with unfamiliar techniques. In this two-week laboratory module, students are given a mixture of proteins of differing sizes and identifying characteristics. Using information gathered from a variety of sources, including uninterpreted spectral data and the results from several assays, students are asked to purify each protein and determine its molecular weight. Through this exercise, students gather information from a wide variety of sources and use it to complete a guided task, building a greater understanding of the uses for the techniques that they implement. Currently, we are conducting a second implementation and will be using retroactive student panel surveys to assess this module.Summary: MODULE 2 (Cassandra Joiner & Kyle Korshavn) We are working to implement a two-week module that will center on student-driven exploration and group-meeting style discussion to evaluate the frequency of non-coding DNA inserts present in human populations utilizing DNA biochemistry techniques. In this module, students will be introduced to tradition methods required for DNA isolation, amplification, and visualization to determine the presence or absence of a non-coding DNA insert in their human genome.
  4. Project: General Chemistry Laboratory Modules Dr. Alex Poniatowski Prof. Bart Bartlett Prof. Brian P. Coppola Topic: Adapting Laboratories for International & Under-resourced settings In collaboration with the University of Michigan African Scholars Program, we are hosting (Fall 2016/Winter 2017) one of twelve visiting scholars. Our guest is interested in the development of general chemistry modules that can be used in his local setting.
  5. Project: Sustainable Polymers (MMSS Program) Prof. Anne McNeil Revise curriculum and course materials based on past experiences (2016-18), develop and test new experiments. Transform some experiments into accessible materials for online and outreach. MMSS = Michigan Math & Science Scholars. We have run a MMSS camp on the topic of polymers for the past three years. This year we focused on a specialized topic: sustainable polymers. Because the topic is narrower, we have an opportunity to go deeper into the concepts and increase their comprehension of fundamentals, which we kind of glossed over in past years in the interest of breadth. We are looking for someone to help us augment the materials, edit the experiments based on our experiences this year, and identify ‘going the extra mile’ activities that the most motivated students can do when there is down time.
  6. Project: CHEM 211 (Organic Laboratory I) Prof. Anne J. McNeil Topic: Course-specific GSI Training Materials and Course Development Graduate student instructors (GSIs) are responsible for much of the undergraduate teaching and learning that takes place in introductory-level chemistry courses at the University of Michigan. The majority of chemistry GSIs have no formal training in education, though, and tend to teach in the ways they were taught. Current Chem 211 curriculum redesign efforts highlight active, learner-centered pedagogies likely to be unfamiliar to GSIs. Furthermore, GSIs assigned to Chem 211 may not have taken organic chemistry in many years, and may not have studied organic chemistry beyond the introductory-level courses required at their undergraduate institutions. Consequently, Chem 211GSIs may lack adequate subject matter and pedagogical preparation for their teaching assignments.To address the need for GSI training, we have begun to develop Chem 211-specific GSI training materials. We envision that these and other to-be-developed materials will comprise the curriculum of a Chem 211 GSI training course. We are looking for a FFGSI to assist in the development of additional GSI training materials for Chem 211.
  7. Project: High School Polymer Science Modules Prof. Anne J. McNeil Topic: Curriculum Materials Development The recent adoption of new K-12 science standards in Michigan means that high school teachers will be looking for standards-aligned science curricula. Such curricula will have students developing knowledge about science content as they engage in authentic science practices, such as planning and carrying out investigations and analyzing and interpreting data. In conjunction with science teacher leaders from nearby Michigan high schools, we will develop high school-level instructional units that focus on polymer science. The FFGSI on this project will be part of a team that creates state standards-aligned instructional materials for use in summer camps and Michigan high schools.
  8. Project: PUI Internship Prof. John Montgomery Topic: Research & Education in a PUI Setting A short-term internship at Hope College can be arranged.
  9. Project: GSI Training Dr. Ginger Shultz Topic: Developing course-specific materials for GSI training. Department-wide graduate student instructor training is traditionally given once, and is brief and general in focus. Therefore graduate students often develop teaching expertise as they go. The overarching goal of this project is to develop course-specific graduate student instructor training for organic chemistry laboratory courses in the department. An FFGSI on this project will work with course coordinators for Chemistry 211 or Chemistry 216 to create educative teaching materials as well as training activities to support GSIs who are assigned to teach these courses.
  10. Project: CHEM 130 (General Chemistry) Dr. Carol Ann Castaneda Topic: Atoms First CHEM 130 resources CHEM 130 has implemented the Atoms first approach, which emphasizes the relationship between structure of atoms and molecules and their properties. The goal of the FFGSI position is to optimize and align resources for the course. FFGSI responsibilities will include: (a) work directly with the E-Coach team in personalizing messages to students throughout the term; (b) ensure that problem roulette questions are synced to this term’s exam schedule; (c) update/create new video solution practice problems
  11. Project: CHEM 130 (General Chemistry- CSP) Dr. Carol Ann Castaneda Topic: Problem-solving for CHEM 130 lecture. CHEM 130 CSP is a section of CHEM 130 with a smaller class size and an extra hour of practice/lecture per week. An FFGSI on this project will delve into education literature and chemistry education resources and develop several classroom activities (that are scalable to 100 students) to enhance the teaching and learning of challenging topics in general chemistry. These may be group worksheets, challenge questions, or dry lab simulations.
  12. Project: CHEM 246/247 (Bioanalytical Chemistry) Prof. Brandon Ruotolo Topic: Introducing Native Mass Spectrometry to Undergraduates in a CHEM 246/247 Native mass spectrometry has become an increasingly important tool in science-related fields, especially when combined with electrospray ionization (ESI). However, many undergraduate students are ill-prepared to use this type of instrumentation that is now required by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies world-wide. In this project, two workflows for ESI-MS experiments that explore protein- protein and protein-ligand interactions in a biochemical analysis