Stories from the Journey

Here, you will find a selection of testimonials and stories from both instructors and students about the nature, successes, and challenges of inclusive teaching. Witnessing these stories can help illuminate the nuance and importance of inclusive teaching practice. If you would like to contribute your story, please reach us via our Contact form.

 

 

Considering the Role of Identities
When Establishing Discussion Norms

 

Fostering Critical Self-Reflection &
Accountability in Difficult Classroom Discussions

 

 

The Importance of Using Students’
Names in Inclusive Teaching

 

 

Designing an Inclusive Course

 

Incorporating Elements of Inclusion
into Classes on Any Topic

 

Fostering Empathy & Cultural Humility
through Community-Based Learning

 

 

Why Practice Inclusive Teaching?

 

Why I’m Committed to Inclusive Teaching

 

Power Dynamics

 

Feedback & Reflection

 

Faculty Conversation on Inclusive Pedagogies
(Full-Length Panel Discussion)

UM Students on Learning and Identity

This clip shows students reflecting on their racial and ethnic identities

in connection to their learning goals at college, and their shifting understanding

of themselves and their development.

UM Students on Race

This shows students engaged in a small-group discussion as part

of a Spectrum activity on social identity. These students

have indicated that race is the identity factor that most impacts them.

UM Students on Social Class

In 2017, the median family income for students at UM was $154,000. In Michigan,

the 2016 median family income was $52,492. 66% of UM families come from the top 20% of

income distribution in the U.S., with 9.3% from the top 1%. Just 3.6% of students are from

families in the lowest 20% of income distribution.

UM Students on Intersections of Race and Gender

In this clip, two students talk about how the intersections of their

racial and gender identities impact their experiences on and around campus.

UM Students on Privilege and “Helping”

In this clip, two students have different understandings of “help.”