Schedule of Events

Event Agenda

*All sessions in Rackham Amphitheatre unless otherwise noted

Wednesday, May 2
Starting 6:00 pm
Opening Reception and Catering
(*University of Michigan Museum of Art)

Thursday, May 3: Laying the Foundation and Framing the Discussion: Development, Trauma, and Technology
8:00 am –
9:00 am
Registration and breakfast
9:00 am –
9:30 am
Welcome and Introduction
                                        E. Royster Harper, Office of the President, University of Michigan
9:30 am –
10:30 am
Development through Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood, Part I
Speakers: Jillian Hardee, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan; Sara McClelland, Departments of Women’s Studies and Psychology, University of Michigan                                                                          Moderator: Carol J. Boyd, School of Nursing, Department of Women’s Studies, Department of Psychiatry, and Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan                                                  Description: The goal of this panel is to kick off this three day event by framing our discussions within the context of development. It’s complicated! In this panel, we will travel from the brain to the environment. Dr. Hardee will begin with a look at the brain as it changes throughout adolescence and emerging adulthood and how risks and consequences associated with gender-based violence are processed through the developing brain. Dr. McClelland will continue the discussion with the social context of development in relation to the socialization of sex and sexuality. Lively discussions regarding the interface between brain development and social context will begin to frame our work in ending gender-based violence.
10:30 am –
11:00 am
Break
11:00 am –
12:00 pm
Development through Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood, Part II
Speakers: Peggy Giordano, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University; Yasamin Kusunoki, School of Nursing and Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan                                                        Moderator: Jennifer S. Barber, Department of Sociology and Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan                                            Description: The goal of this panel is to narrow the lens onto the development of intimate partnerships and where things can go wrong and what can go right. Let’s get personal… In this panel we will discuss the development of intimate relationships throughout adolescence and emerging adulthood. Dr. Giordano will begin with a discussion of relationships in adolescence and emerging adulthood, focusing on how and why things can go wrong and get physical during conflicts. Dr. Kusunoki will then begin a discussion on sexual and reproductive coercion during these developmental periods. This panel will focus on a dynamic discussion of relationships throughout adolescence and emerging adulthood and the importance of this time period in establishing healthy relationships.
12:00 pm –
1:15 pm
Lunch – Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center presentation (SAPAC)
Speakers: Rebecca Avella, SAPAC, University of Michigan; Jennifer Osetek, SAPAC, University of Michigan; Kaaren Williamsen, SAPAC, University of Michigan                                                                                                         Moderator: Kaaren Williamsen, SAPAC, University of Michigan               (Michigan League)
1:30 pm –
3:00 pm
Current Interventions and Need for Trauma-Informed Care

Speakers: Cleopatra Howard Caldwell, School of Public Health, University of Michigan; Hillary Baldwin Steller, School of Social Work, University of Michigan; Susan Cole, Trauma and Learning Policy Initiative and Harvard Law School                                                                                             Moderator: Elizabeth Kuzma, School of Nursing, University of Michigan Description: The goal of this panel is to present current treatment, intervention, and prevention approaches that are trauma-informed or trauma-sensitive. Dr. Caldwell will begin this discussion with an examination of community factors in gender-based violence. She will review the current state of the science with regard to community interventions with a specific emphasis on the role of men and boys in the discourse around gender-based violence. Ms. Baldwin Steller will then focus on the importance of trauma informed therapy, what trauma informed therapy entails, and what happens when therapy is not trauma informed. She will extend the earlier conversation regarding neural development into what happens in the traumatized brain and why previous approaches to trauma treatment often did more harm than good. Dr. Cole then tackles the context in which many children spend the majority of their time: schools. Dr. Cole leads a discussion on trauma sensitive schools, why they are needed, and what happens to students when there are no trauma resources available to them during their academic day. She will also expand on the discussion of the traumatized brain by leading a discussion on how trauma in the brain affects the school community and academic life of traumatized students. She will also lead a discussion on how these principles apply to post-secondary education. This session will be time for the forum at large to begin examining where the field stands with regard to interventions for gender-based violence, taking into account individual as well as contextual factors.

3:00 pm –
3:30 pm
Break
3:30 pm –
5:00 pm
Gender, Technology, and Violence
Speakers: L. Monique Ward, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan; Quyen Ngo, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan; André Brock, Department of Communication Studies, University of Michigan                                                                                              Moderator: Jason Goldstick, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan                                                                                           Description: The goal of this panel will be to examine the role of technology in exacerbating and/or mitigating gender-based violence and its consequences, specifically using an intersectional lens. This will be a dynamic discussion between Drs. Ward, Ngo, and Brock. We will begin with a presentation by Dr. Ward who will address adolescent and emerging adult engagement in social media and traditional technologies, particularly among youth of color, and how it contributes to dating violence. Dr. Ngo will then describe current research in technology-mediated dating violence, how it is conceptualized, operationalized, and presented. Dr. Brock will round out the discussion using a qualitative methodological lens to interrogate assumptions of current methodological approaches, with particular focus on the digital embodiment of identity and sexuality among youth. This critical discussion will be a jumping point for additional conversations and debates around how the field can improve the state of the science in order to end gender-based violence.
5:30 pm –
7:00 pm
Keynote with Poster Session and hors d’oeuvres
#InMyWords: Why America needs a social movement for survivors’ justice
Speaker: Sofie Karasek
(Michigan League)

Friday, May 4: Intersections of Law, Policy, and Practice
8:00 am –
9:00 am
Registration and breakfast
(Rackham Assembly Hall)
9:00 am –
10:15 am
Student Experiences of Reporting Campus Sexual Assault
Speakers: Fabiana Diaz; Kendal Rosalik
Moderator: Heather Colohan, Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center (SAPAC), University of Michigan                                              Description: The “Student Experiences of Reporting Campus Sexual Assault” panel invites two University of Michigan alumnae, Fabiana Diaz & Kendal Rosalik, who have both undergone the school’s Title IX investigation process to share their experiences with reporting their own campus sexual assaults. This panel will explore cultural and media implications for the investigation process, potential barriers to students, how the University can effectively support students through the investigation process, how we as members of the University of Michigan can collectively work together to prevent campus sexual assault, as well as time allotted for questions from the audience for the panelists.
10:15 am –
10:45 am
Break
10:45 am –
12:00 pm
The Policy Context: Past, Present, and Future
Speakers: Pamela Heatlie, Office for Institutional Equity​, University of Michigan; Sam Bagenstos, School of Law, University of Michigan; Caroline Bettinger-López, School of Law, University of Miami                                     Moderator: Suellyn Scarnecchia, University of Michigan Law School Human Trafficking Clinic                                                                                  DescriptionThis panel will discuss the following questions: What law governs gender-based violence on campus? What are the main elements of a campus student sexual misconduct policy? What policy elements cause the greatest tension as individual campuses and other experts attempt to develop fair and coherent policies? What is the relationship between various federal and state policy makers and college campuses – how is policy made and enforced? What might we expect looking forward?
12:00 pm –
1:00 pm
Lunch with Discussions
(Rackham Assembly Hall, East and West Conference Rooms, Earl Lewis Room) 
1:00 pm –
2:30 pm
Keynote
Gender Violence, Racism, and The Build up of a Prison Nation: The Case For Feminist Abolition Politics

Speakers: Beth Richie, Department of African American Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago                                                                                Moderator: Elizabeth A. Armstrong, Departments of Sociology, Organizational Studies, and Women’s Studies, University of Michigan   Description: This presentation will focus on the ways that gender violence, systemic racism and criminalization interact to create particular vulnerabilities for Black women and other marginalized groups.  Using the conceptual framework of a Prison Nation and the framework of Carceral Feminism Beth Richie will bring a feminist analysis to the convergence of these issues.  The presentation will conclude with a discussion of the role that abolition could assume as a social justice strategy.

2:30 pm –
2:45 pm
Break
2:45 pm –
3:45 pm

Concurrent Sessions

(Rackham Amphitheatre, East and West Conference Rooms, Earl Lewis Room)

Practice: Restorative Justice

Speakers: David Karp, Project on Restorative Justice, Skidmore College; Carrie Landrum, Office of Student Conflict Resolution, University of Michigan; Elise Lopez, College of Public Health, University of Arizona; Kaaren Williamsen, Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center (SAPAC), University of Michigan
Moderator: Kaaren Williamsen, Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center (SAPAC), University of Michigan
Description: Restorative justice scholars and practitioners will discuss the opportunities and challenges related to using restorative justice to address campus sexual misconduct. Panelists will discuss how restorative justice approaches are already in use and will discuss emerging areas for implementation.

Research: Studying Campus Sexual Misconduct Policies

Speakers: Elizabeth A. Armstrong, Departments of Sociology, Organizational Studies, and Women’s Studies, University of Michigan; Sandra Levitsky, Department of Sociology, University of Michigan; Kamaria Porter, School of Education, University of Michigan; Charlotte Hoppen, Department of Sociology, University of Michigan; Kia Schwert, Department of Sociology, University of Michigan
Moderator: Erin Bonar, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan
Description: This session introduces Armstrong and Levitsky’s research project investigating how universities respond to sexual misconduct in an uncertain legal environment. With a team of a dozen graduate students and more than 30 students, they have collected and coded the 2016 sexual misconduct policies, Annual Security Reports, and web information on resources and reporting of 382 four-year American universities. Kamaria Porter, a graduate student on the project, will present some preliminary results on how schools define sexual consent. Charlotte Hoppen and Kia Schwert, two undergraduate researchers on the project, will discuss their experiences working on the project and the ways in which it has inspired their ongoing activism.

The Next Generation of Campus Climate Surveys

Speakers: William Axinn, Population Studies Center, University of Michigan; Kevin Swartout, Psychology and Public Health, Georgia State University
Moderator: Lilia Cortina, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan
Description: Recent years have seen a flurry of survey activity on college campuses seeking to better understand sexual violence. One example is the ARC3 Campus Climate Survey, developed through a collaboration of sexual assault and harassment researchers, student and legal affairs professionals, campus advocates, students, and campus law enforcement. Another is the University of Michigan Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Misconduct; a team including survey method experts, student affairs professionals, and legal professionals designed this survey’s questions and methodology. Leaders of these two large-scale survey efforts will discuss their strengths and weaknesses, and share their opinions about what the future holds for the next generation of campus climate surveys on gender-based violence.

Practice: Intersectional Identities and the Challenge of Policy and Response

Speakers: Nadia Bazzy, Office of Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs, University of Michigan; Will Sherry, Spectrum Center, University of Michigan
Moderator: Nadia Bazzy, Office of Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs, University of Michigan

3:45 pm –
4:00 pm
Break
4:00 pm –
5:00 pm

Concurrent Sessions

(Rackham Amphitheatre, East and West Conference Rooms, Earl Lewis Room)

Mandatory Reporting

Speakers: Kathryn Holland, Departments of Psychology and Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Nebraska; Kathy Hagenian, Executive Policy Director, Michigan Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence; Pamela Heatlie, Office for Institutional Equity, University of Michigan
Moderator: Lilia Cortina, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan
Description: Nationwide, many universities have started designating most if not all faculty and staff as “mandatory reporters,” obligated to report any student disclosure of gender-based violence to university officials (and, in some cases, to police). They are required to report not only relevant facts but also identifying information—including the names of the survivor, alleged perpetrator (if known), and any witnesses. The reporting mandate applies even in cases when the survivor does not consent to the report. Mandatory reporting policies have been prompted and shaped by federal law and guidance, including Title IX and The Clery Act. Panelists in this session will discuss the pros and cons of mandatory reporting — from the perspectives of research, law and public policy, and institutional efforts to end gender-based violence.

Community Matters Programs at the University of Michigan: A Peer Education Approach

Speakers: Allie Harte, Student Life, University of Michigan; Laura McAndrew, University Health Service, University of Michigan
Moderator: Jennifer Osetek, SAPAC, University of Michigan
Description: This session will explore the peer education models that are foundational to programming for all first-year students at the University of Michigan, Community Matters programs. Participants will learn about the programs themselves, theory behind the peer education approach, programmatic values that inform work with facilitators, practical applications for peer responsibilities and development, and lessons learned working with students and colleagues in peer educational processes.

Research: Perpetration

Speakers: Yasamin Kusunoki, School of Nursing and Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan; Quyen Ngo, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan; Kevin Swartout, Department of Psychology and School of Public Health, Georgia State University
Moderator: Richard Tolman, School of Social Work, University of Michigan

6:00 pm
Dine-around at various local restaurants

Saturday, May 5: Innovations, Campus, Community, and Beyond
8:00 am –
9:00 am
Registration and breakfast
(Rackham Assembly Hall)
9:00 am –
9:15 pm
Welcome
9:15 am –
10:15 am
Ignite Talks

Speakers: Reshma Jagsi, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School; Brian Heilman, Promundo; Nicole Denson, Wayne County Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners Program; Shamita Das Dasgupta, Manavi and Praxis International; Carmen Wargel, Macomb Community Domestic Violence Council; Suellyn Scarnecchia, University of Michigan Law School Human Trafficking Clinic; Kathryn Clancy, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign                                                                  Moderator: Richard Tolman, School of Social Work, University of Michigan

10:15 am –
10:30 am
Break
10:30 am –
12:00 pm

Concurrent Sessions

(Rackham Amphitheatre, East and West Conference Rooms, Earl Lewis Room)

Athletics and Gender-based Violence Interventions

Speakers: Greg Harden, Athletic Department, University of Michigan; Rachel Haas, NoMore; Brian Heilman, Promundo
Moderator: Debi Cain, Michigan Domestic and Sexual Violence Prevention and Treatment Board, Division of Victim Services
Description: This panel examines sports as a context where gender based violence may occur and also how athletes become involved in efforts to prevent gender-based violence. Panelists will discuss 1) how a university athletic department responds to respond to and prevent gender-based violence sports at the college level 2) a mass media campaign that partnered with professional athletes to promote awareness of and prevention of gender-based violence and 3) global efforts to implement community-based programming focused on sports.

Innovations in Gender-based Violence Intervention

Speakers: Nicole Denson, Wayne County Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners Program; David J.H. Garvin, Catholic Social Services of Washtenaw County, Alternatives to Domestic Aggression, Batterer Intervention Program; Lisa Young Larance, Schools of Social Work and Sociology, University of Michigan, RENEW Program
Moderator: Lindsay Cannon, School of Nursing, University of Michigan
Description: Practitioners spearheading innovative community-based efforts to end GBV will share their collective wisdom. Through this interactive process, panelists will answer the following questions: What does research get right about the work you are doing? What do you think research is missing about the work you are doing? What would you like to see in future researcher-practitioner collaborations?

Centering Culture in Gender-based Violence Interventions

Speakers: Michelle Munro-Kramer, School of Nursing, University of Michigan; Sarah Rominski, University of Michigan Medical School; Shamita Das Dasgupta, Manavi and Praxis International; Merkeb Yohannes, Michigan Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence
Moderator: Nick Metheny, School of Nursing, University of Michigan
Description: Panelists will discuss interventions that are tailored based on sociocultural needs. Panelists will discuss: 1) adapting a campus-based sexual violence prevention program to Ghana, 2) developing community-based resources South Asian women experiencing violence, and 3) working with communities of color to address various forms of gender-based violence.

LGBTQ Survivors of Partner Abuse and Sexual Violence

Speakers: Nicole Bedera, Department of Sociology, University of Michigan; Jacqulyn Hippe, LGBT Detroit; Serena Johnson, Equality Michigan; Sarah Peitzmeier, School of Nursing, University of Michigan; Rob Stephenson, School of Nursing, University of Michigan; Carmen Wargel, Macomb Community Domestic Violence Council
Moderator: Nicole Bedera, Department of Sociology, University of Michigan
Description: LGBTQ survivors of gender-based violence have unique experiences with gender-based violence and require inclusive care for successful healing from trauma. This panel will address concerns specific to LGBTQ survivors of gender-based violence, confront myths about violence in the LGBTQ community, and discuss the barriers of historical trauma that impact LGBTQ survivors’ recovery.

12:00 pm –
1:15 pm
Networking lunch
(Rackham Assembly Hall, East and West Conference Rooms, Earl Lewis Room)
1:15 pm –
2:45 pm

Concurrent Sessions

(Rackham Amphitheatre, East and West Conference Rooms, Earl Lewis Room)

Human Trafficking

Speakers: Suellyn Scarnecchia, University of Michigan Law School Human Trafficking Clinic; Michelle Pardee, School of Nursing, University of Michigan; Melissa Novock, Wayne County Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners Program
Moderator: Michelle Munro-Kramer, School of Nursing, University of Michigan
Description: This panel will discuss human trafficking from healthcare, criminal justice, and legal perspectives including a description of the types and venues of human trafficking, tips for identifying victims and the warning signs of human trafficking in the health care setting, and an overview of resources for suspected victims of human trafficking. This panel is designed to meet the State of Michigan’s requirements for education related to human trafficking for healthcare providers.

Sexual Harassment

Speakers: NiCole Buchanan, Department of Psychology, Michigan State University; Lilia Cortina, Departments of Psychology and Women’s Studies, University of Michigan; Kathryn Clancy, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Joanna Grossman, School of Law, Southern Methodist University
Moderator: Lilia Cortina, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan
Description: One out of every two women is sexually harassed on the job, making it one of the most widespread forms of gendered violence. What does that harassment look like, who gets targeted with it, and why? Moreover, how can we move the needle on this problem? These questions have motivated several decades of social science and legal reform, which will be discussed in this session.

Engaging Men and Boys in Gender-based Violence Prevention and Interventions

Speakers: Vijay Singh, Departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School; Brian Heilman, Promundo; Richard Tolman, School of Social Work, University of Michigan; Lisa Nitsch, House of Ruth Maryland
Moderator: Tina Jiwatram-Negrón, School of Social Work, University of Michigan
Description: Panelists will focus on a spectrum of efforts to include boys and men in prevention of gender-based violence. These efforts include screening of men in health care settings for perpetration and victimization of violence, community interventions for perpetrators of gender-based violence, gender transformative programming aimed at boys and men in global contexts, and global efforts to engage men and boys as allies to end gender-based violence and promote gender equality.

3:00 pm –
4:00 pm
Moving Forward and Making Connections
      Sweet and salty dessert bar, fruit and cheese, coffee and drinks