Lab News – MIND LAB

Dr. Luke Hyde Featured in BrainSTEM Podcast

Dr. Hyde was recently featured on the Brainstem Podcast with Dr. Hilary Marusak to discuss antisocial behavior. If you’re interested in watching/listening you can use this link to access the podcast. You can also find the audio versions on achor, spotify and google podcasts.

University of Michigan MiND and TaD Labs Hiring New Lab Manager

The Michigan Neurogenetics and Developmental Psychopathology (MiND) lab, directed by Dr. Luke Hyde, and the Translational and Developmental Neuroscience (TaD) lab, directed by Christopher Monk, are searching for a lab manager/research assistant (Research Technician Associate) for two projects. These projects examine the development of adolescent and young adult risk and resilience from multiple levels of …

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Diversity Recruitment Weekend 2020 – Friday, October 16th and Saturday, October 17th

The Diversity Recruitment Weekend provides eligible undergraduate students from around the country with information about graduate school in psychology, including at the University of Michigan. The Diversity Recruitment Weekend is completely FREE. This year the program will be conducted entirely online, and will begin on the morning of Friday, October 16 and will run until …

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UofM awarded $6.7 million grant through the Study of Adolescent to Adult Neural Development (SAND)

The MiND Lab is part of a team that was awarded a 6.7 million dollar grant to study poverty-related adversity and its affects on threat and reward systems and the development of depression and anxiety. Specifically, this study will allow Dr. Hyde, Dr. Chris Monk, Dr. Colter Mitchell, and their teams to focus on low-income …

UofM awarded $6.7 million grant through the Study of Adolescent to Adult Neural Development (SAND) Read More »

Antisocial behavior associated with abnormal white matter brain structure in men with callous-unemotional traits

“A study published in NeuroImage: Clinical provides new insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of antisocial behaviors. The research indicates that the combination of antisocial behavior and callous-unemotional traits is associated with alterations in neural networks involved in fear conditioning, reward processing, and inhibitory control…” https://www.psypost.org/2019/06/antisocial-behavior-associated-with-abnormal-white-matter-brain-structure-in-men-with-callous-unemotional-traits-53833

Antisocial behaviors in children linked to parenting

“Researchers at the University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania and Michigan State University studied 227 pairs of identical twins. They analyzed small differences in the parenting that each twin experienced to determine whether these differences predict the likelihood of antisocial behaviors emerging…” https://news.umich.edu/antisocial-behaviors-in-children-linked-to-parenting/

Warmer parenting makes antisocial toddlers more empathetic

“When parents act warmly and responsively toward young children who exhibit antisocial behavior, the children begin acting more warmly too. That’s according to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, in which researchers examined whether there are differences in response to parental harshness and warmth among three-year-olds who exhibit “callously unemotional” behavior…” https://psmag.com/social-justice/warmer-parenting-makes-toddlers-empathetic-87287

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