Calendar

Oct
16
Wed
Jeff Morrison: Guardians of Detroit: Architectural Sculpture in the Motor City @ Saline District Library
Oct 16 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Detroit is home to gargoyles, grotesques, and guardians that silently watch over the city from their posts high above the sidewalks and streets. Author and photographer Jeff Morrison will discuss the symbolism behind the ornamentation and hear some of the untold stories of the artists, artisans, and architects involved in its creation, all drawn from his book The Guardians of Detroit: Architectural Sculpture in the Motor City. Copies of the book and coloring book will be available for purchase before and after the presentation.

Poetry Salon: One Pause Poetry @ Argus Farm Stop
Oct 16 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm

ONE PAUSE POETRY SALON is (literally) a greenhouse for poetry and poets, nurturing an appreciation for written art in all languages and encouraging experiments in creative writing.

We meet every Weds in the greenhouse at Argus Farm Stop on Liberty St. The poems we read each time are unified by form (haiku, sonnet, spoken word), poet, time / place (Tang Dynasty, English Romanticism, New York in the 70s) or theme / mood (springtime, poems with cats, protest poems). We discuss the poems and play writing games together, with time for snacks and socializing in between.

Members are encouraged to share their own poems or poems they like – they may or may not relate to the theme of the evening. This is not primarily a workshop – we may hold special workshop nights, but mostly we listen to and talk about poems for the sake of inspiring new writing.

Whether you are a published poet or encountering poetry for the first time, we invite you to join us!

$5 suggested donation for food, drinks and printing costs.

8-10 p.m., Argus Farm Stop greenhouse, 325 W. Liberty. $5 suggested donation. onepausepoetry.org, 707-1284.

 

 

 

Oct
17
Thu
Zell Visiting Writers Series: C.M. Burroughs: Roundtable @ Hopwood Room, 1176 Angell Hall
Oct 17 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

CM Burroughs’ book of poems, The Vital System (Tupelo Press), illuminates what she calls “the protective capability of violence.” In the words of renowned French feminist scholar Hélène Cixous: “Burroughs delves into the ultra-sensitive roots of being; where sufferings and desires take shape, she gathers each breath as yet unheard and leads it to speech.”

Burroughs is an Associate Professor of Poetry at Columbia College Chicago. She has been awarded fellowships and grants from Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, Djerassi Foundation, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Cave Canem Foundation. She has received commissions from the Studio Museum of Harlem and the Warhol Museum to create poetry in response to art installations.

Her poetry has appeared in journals and anthologies including Poetry, Callaloo, jubilat, Ploughshares, VOLT, and Best American Experimental Writing 2015. Her second book, Master Suffering, will be published by Tupelo Press in 2020.

This event is free and open to the public.

The Zell Visiting Writers Series brings outstanding writers to campus each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (BA ’64, LLDHon ’13). For more information, please visit the Zell Visiting Writers Program webpage: https://lsa.umich.edu/writers

Lauren Bon: Life is Abundant @ Michigan Theater
Oct 17 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Lauren Bon is an environmental artist from Los Angeles, CA. Her practice, Metabolic Studio, explores self-sustaining and self-diversifying systems of exchange that feed emergent properties that regenerate the life web. Some of her works include: Not A Cornfield, which transformed and revived an industrial brownfield in downtown Los Angeles into a thirty-two-acre cornfield for one agricultural cycle; 100 Mules Walking the Los Angeles Aqueduct, a 240-mile performative action that aimed to reconnect the city of Los Angeles with the source of its water for the centenary of the opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Her studio’s current work, Bending the River Back into the City, aims to utilize Los Angeles’ first private water right to deliver 106-acre feet of water annually from the LA River to over 50 acres of land in the historic core of downtown LA. This model can be replicated to regenerate the 52-mile LA River, reconnect it to its floodplain and form a citizens’ utility.

Co-presented with the Community of Food, Society and Justice Conference, October 17-18. This conference will engage students, faculty, staff, farmers, and the community in rigorous dialogue around the challenges of meeting the nutritional needs of our communities, while also protecting the planet, promoting healthy lives, and ensuring food justice. The conference is free and open to the public, thanks to its co-sponsors: the U-M Residential College, East Quad Garden, Michigan Dining, U-M Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, U-M Sustainable Food Program, U-M Campus Farm, Knight Wallace House, U-M Program in the Environment, Michigan Law Environmental Law and Policy Program, U-M Museum of Anthropological Archaeology, and the Penny Stamps Distinguished Speakers Series.

Stamps Lecture Series: Lauren Bon: Life is Abundant @ Michigan Theater
Oct 17 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Based in Los Angeles,Lauren Bon is an artist who works with architecture, performance, photography, sound, and farming to create urban, public, and land art projects to galvanize social and political transformation. Her practice, Metabolic Studio, explores self-sustaining and self-diversifying systems of exchange that feed emergent properties that regenerate the life web. Some of her works include: Not A Cornfield, which transformed and revived an industrial brownfield in downtown Los Angeles into a thirty-two-acre cornfield for one agricultural cycle; 100 Mules Walking the Los Angeles Aqueduct, a 240-mile performative action that aimed to reconnect the city of Los Angeles with the source of its water for the centenary of the opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Her studio’s current work, Bending the River Back into the City, aims to utilize Los Angeles’ first private water right to deliver 106-acre feet of water annually from the LA River to over 50 acres of land in the historic core of downtown LA. This model can be replicated to regenerate the 52-mile LA River, reconnect it to its floodplain and form a citizens’ utility.

Co-presented with the Community of Food, Society and Justice Conference, October 17-18. This conference will engage students, faculty, staff, farmers, and the community in rigorous dialogue around the challenges of meeting the nutritional needs of our communities, while also protecting the planet, promoting healthy lives, and ensuring food justice. The conference is free and open to the public, thanks to its co-sponsors: the U-M Residential College, East Quad Garden, Michigan Dining, U-M Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, U-M Sustainable Food Program, U-M Campus Farm, Knight Wallace House, U-M Program in the Environment, Michigan Law Environmental Law and Policy Program, U-M Museum of Anthropological Archaeology, and the Penny Stamps Distinguished Speakers Series.

Oct
18
Fri
Lecture: FiveThirtyEight’s Clare Malone on the 2020 Presidential Election @ AADL Downtown (Lobby)
Oct 18 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Journalist Clare Malone will discuss the role that gender, class, and race played in the 2016 presidential election and how they might impact the 2020 election.

Clare Malone is a Senior Political Reporter for FiveThirtyEight and a member of the popular podcast FiveThirtyEight Politics. She previously worked at The New Yorker and her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Harper’s, The American Prospect, and more.

Oct
19
Sat
YpsiWrites Grand Opening Celebration @ Ypsilanti District Library (Whittaker)
Oct 19 @ 11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Celebrate the new YpsiWrites and the National Day on Writing. Try out writing activities, learn from area writers and authors, and share your own writing experiences. There will be giveaways from local businesses. For more information, contact ypsiwrites@gmail.com

Mystery Author D.M. Pulley: No One’s Home @ AADL Downtown
Oct 19 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Mystery and suspense author D.M. Pulley discusses her new book No One’s Home, a dark tale of a mansion haunted by a legacy of tragedy and a family trapped by lies that is sure to appeal to fans of The Haunting of Hill House.

Margot and Myron Spielman move to a new town, looking for a fresh start and an escape from the long shadow of their past. But soon after they buy Rawlingswood, a foreclosed mansion rumored to be haunted, they realize they’re in for more of the same…or worse. As tensions build between the family members, the home’s dark history threatens to repeat itself. Margot and Myron must confront their own ghosts and Rawlingswood’s buried past before the house becomes their undoing.

D.M. Pulley lives in northeast Ohio with her husband, her two children, and a dog named Hobo. Before becoming a full-time writer, she worked as a Professional Engineer rehabbing historic structures and conducting forensic investigations of building failures. Pulley’s structural survey of a vacant building in Cleveland inspired her debut novel, The Dead Key, the winner of the 2014 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award.

This event is in partnership with Aunt Agatha’s. The event includes a signing and books will be for sale.

Oct
20
Sun
John Kinzinger: Sacrifices Not Forgotten @ First United Methodist Church
Oct 20 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

The book, Sacrifices Not Forgotten was written by Vietnam Veteran John Kinzinger to honor the 76 Washtenaw County servicemen who were missing or killed in action in Vietnam. This will be a heart-to-heart conversation about the Ypsilanti Memorial dedicated to their service and the book that tells their stories The Memorial is on the grounds of the Ypsilanti Township Civic Center, at 7200 South Huron River Drive. This program is free and open to the public. Bring a friend.

Oct
21
Mon
Q and A with Editor Carey Salerno @ Angell Hall, Room 4058
Oct 21 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am

Carey Salerno is the executive editor and director of Alice James Books where she has been serving underrepresented voices in the literary community since 2008. She is also the author of Shelter (2009) and coeditor of Lit From Inside: 40 Years of Poetry from Alice James Books (2013). She teaches poetry writing for the University of Maine at Farmington and has been invited to teach or lecture on poetry and editing at places like the University of Washington, Indiana University, Bread Loaf, Butler University, Washington State University, Colrain, The Writer’s Hotel, and The New School. You may find her poems–and articles and interviews regarding her other professional work–in print and online, most recently in The Literary Review and New England Review.