Calendar

Oct
14
Mon
Ann Patchett: The Dutch House @ Rackham Auditorium
Oct 14 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Tickets available now. Purchase them here.

Literati Bookstore is honored to welcome Ann Patchett to Rackham Auditorium for an event in support of her latest novel, The Dutch House, and in benefit of the Book Industry Charitable Foundation.

Established in 1996, The Book Industry Charitable Foundation’s mission is to strengthen the bookselling community through charitable programs that support bookstore employees and their families. The Foundation was imagined and built by booksellers and proudly continues to be their safety net. Since its inception, the organization has provided more than $6.6 million in financial assistance and scholarships to more than 7,476 families. Find out more about The Foundation and donate here.

The program will consist of an author talk and Q&A.

A very limited number of VIP tickets are available. These tickets provide access to a 5:30pm-6:30pm pre-event meet & greet with Ann at the Michigan League (light refreshments served), a hardcover copy of The Dutch House, and reserved general admission seating for the event at Rackham. All proceeds, after the price of the book, from this ticket go directly to the Book Industry Charitable Foundation. Additional reception details and instructions will be sent to guests ahead of the event.

General admission book bundle tickets are also available and include a pre-signed copy of The Dutch House, to be picked up at the venue the evening of the event.

Surface parking in downtown Ann Arbor may be limited. A detailed map of available (and walkable) parking structures can be found here.

About The Dutch House:

At the end of the Second World War, Cyril Conroy combines luck and a single canny investment to begin an enormous real estate empire, propelling his family from poverty to enormous wealth. His first order of business is to buy the Dutch House, a lavish estate in the suburbs outside of Philadelphia. Meant as a surprise for his wife, the house sets in motion the undoing of everyone he loves.

The story is told by Cyril’s son Danny, as he and his older sister, the brilliantly acerbic and self-assured Maeve, are exiled from the house where they grew up by their stepmother. The two wealthy siblings are thrown back into the poverty their parents had escaped from and find that all they have to count on is one another. It is this unshakeable bond between them that both saves their lives and thwarts their futures.

Set over the course of five decades, The Dutch House is a dark fairy tale about two smart people who cannot overcome their past. Despite every outward sign of success, Danny and Maeve are only truly comfortable when they’re together. Throughout their lives they return to the well-worn story of what they’ve lost with humor and rage. But when at last they’re forced to confront the people who left them behind, the relationship between an indulged brother and his ever-protective sister is finally tested.

Ann Patchett is the author of seven novels and three works of nonfiction. She is the winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award, England’s Orange Prize, and the Book Sense Book of the Year, and was named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World. Her work has been translated into more than thirty languages. She is the co-owner of Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tennessee, where she lives with her husband, Karl, and their dog, Sparky.

Additional event questions? Email John@LiteratiBookstore.com

Dennis Rasbauch: Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the Petersburg Campaign @ St. Jospeh Mercy Hospital (Exhibition Room)
Oct 14 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Dennis A. Rasbach, MD, is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. As a busy practicing surgeon, he is an unlikely author of a micro history of the Civil War experience at the Front of Petersburg on June 18, 1864. The inception of the book was pure serendipity. While investigating the movements of his great-great-grandfather’s regiment, the 21st Pennsylvania Cavalry, his focus was suddenly and unexpectedly diverted to Joshua Chamberlain and his famous charge. Glaring contradictions emerged as the popular narrative of that event was compared with the historical record. Those inconsistencies prompted an intense search for clarification and resolution, which, over the course of a year and with help from a network of new Civil War friends, grew into the present work. Dennis is a member of the Civil War Round Table of Southwest Michigan. The father of two sons, he resides with his lovely wife Ellen in St. Joseph, Michigan. Coincidentally, his birthday is June 18, the day of the Petersburg charge.

Jon Milan and Gail Offen: Michigan Haunts: Public Places, Eerie Spaces @ AADL Downtown
Oct 14 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Michigan has always been a region of mystery. Many strange occurrences have been documented, and tales of allegedly paranormal activity continue to surface to the present day. From the notorious hauntings of remote lighthouses like Seul Choix, to the hauntings of Eloise—one of the most famous psychiatric asylums in America—to the ghost of Minnie Quay, who still wanders Northern Michigan shorelines, co-authors Jon Milan and Gail Offen explore Michigan’s most haunted places in their latest book, Michigan Haunts: Public Places, Eerie Spaces. Join us for a spooky evening of local history!

This event includes a signing with books for sale.

Oct
16
Wed
Zohar Weiman-Kelman: Queer Expectations: A Genealogy of Jewish Women’s Poetry @ Rackham (East Conference Room)
Oct 16 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Zohar Weiman-Kelman will be discussing their recently published book, Queer Expectations: a Genealogy of Jewish Women’s Poetry (SUNY Press, 2018). Bringing together Jewish women’s poetry in English, Yiddish, and Hebrew from late nineteenth century through the 1970s, this talk will explore how Jewish women writers turned to poetry to write new histories. Developing “queer expectancy” as a conceptual tool for understanding how literary texts can both invoke and resist what came before, Weiman-Kelman demonstrates how poets push back against heteronormative imperatives of biological reproduction and inheritance, opting instead for connections that twist traditional models of gender and history. Looking backward in queer ways thus enables new histories to emerge, intervenes in a troubled present, and gives hope for unexpected futures.

Jeff Morrison: Guardians of Detroit: Architectural Sculpture in the Motor City @ Saline District Library
Oct 16 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Detroit is home to gargoyles, grotesques, and guardians that silently watch over the city from their posts high above the sidewalks and streets. Author and photographer Jeff Morrison will discuss the symbolism behind the ornamentation and hear some of the untold stories of the artists, artisans, and architects involved in its creation, all drawn from his book The Guardians of Detroit: Architectural Sculpture in the Motor City. Copies of the book and coloring book will be available for purchase before and after the presentation.

Poetry Salon: One Pause Poetry @ Argus Farm Stop
Oct 16 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm

ONE PAUSE POETRY SALON is (literally) a greenhouse for poetry and poets, nurturing an appreciation for written art in all languages and encouraging experiments in creative writing.

We meet every Weds in the greenhouse at Argus Farm Stop on Liberty St. The poems we read each time are unified by form (haiku, sonnet, spoken word), poet, time / place (Tang Dynasty, English Romanticism, New York in the 70s) or theme / mood (springtime, poems with cats, protest poems). We discuss the poems and play writing games together, with time for snacks and socializing in between.

Members are encouraged to share their own poems or poems they like – they may or may not relate to the theme of the evening. This is not primarily a workshop – we may hold special workshop nights, but mostly we listen to and talk about poems for the sake of inspiring new writing.

Whether you are a published poet or encountering poetry for the first time, we invite you to join us!

$5 suggested donation for food, drinks and printing costs.

8-10 p.m., Argus Farm Stop greenhouse, 325 W. Liberty. $5 suggested donation. onepausepoetry.org, 707-1284.

 

 

 

Oct
17
Thu
Lauren Bon: Life is Abundant @ Michigan Theater
Oct 17 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Lauren Bon is an environmental artist from Los Angeles, CA. Her practice, Metabolic Studio, explores self-sustaining and self-diversifying systems of exchange that feed emergent properties that regenerate the life web. Some of her works include: Not A Cornfield, which transformed and revived an industrial brownfield in downtown Los Angeles into a thirty-two-acre cornfield for one agricultural cycle; 100 Mules Walking the Los Angeles Aqueduct, a 240-mile performative action that aimed to reconnect the city of Los Angeles with the source of its water for the centenary of the opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Her studio’s current work, Bending the River Back into the City, aims to utilize Los Angeles’ first private water right to deliver 106-acre feet of water annually from the LA River to over 50 acres of land in the historic core of downtown LA. This model can be replicated to regenerate the 52-mile LA River, reconnect it to its floodplain and form a citizens’ utility.

Co-presented with the Community of Food, Society and Justice Conference, October 17-18. This conference will engage students, faculty, staff, farmers, and the community in rigorous dialogue around the challenges of meeting the nutritional needs of our communities, while also protecting the planet, promoting healthy lives, and ensuring food justice. The conference is free and open to the public, thanks to its co-sponsors: the U-M Residential College, East Quad Garden, Michigan Dining, U-M Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, U-M Sustainable Food Program, U-M Campus Farm, Knight Wallace House, U-M Program in the Environment, Michigan Law Environmental Law and Policy Program, U-M Museum of Anthropological Archaeology, and the Penny Stamps Distinguished Speakers Series.

Stamps Lecture Series: Lauren Bon: Life is Abundant @ Michigan Theater
Oct 17 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Based in Los Angeles,Lauren Bon is an artist who works with architecture, performance, photography, sound, and farming to create urban, public, and land art projects to galvanize social and political transformation. Her practice, Metabolic Studio, explores self-sustaining and self-diversifying systems of exchange that feed emergent properties that regenerate the life web. Some of her works include: Not A Cornfield, which transformed and revived an industrial brownfield in downtown Los Angeles into a thirty-two-acre cornfield for one agricultural cycle; 100 Mules Walking the Los Angeles Aqueduct, a 240-mile performative action that aimed to reconnect the city of Los Angeles with the source of its water for the centenary of the opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Her studio’s current work, Bending the River Back into the City, aims to utilize Los Angeles’ first private water right to deliver 106-acre feet of water annually from the LA River to over 50 acres of land in the historic core of downtown LA. This model can be replicated to regenerate the 52-mile LA River, reconnect it to its floodplain and form a citizens’ utility.

Co-presented with the Community of Food, Society and Justice Conference, October 17-18. This conference will engage students, faculty, staff, farmers, and the community in rigorous dialogue around the challenges of meeting the nutritional needs of our communities, while also protecting the planet, promoting healthy lives, and ensuring food justice. The conference is free and open to the public, thanks to its co-sponsors: the U-M Residential College, East Quad Garden, Michigan Dining, U-M Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, U-M Sustainable Food Program, U-M Campus Farm, Knight Wallace House, U-M Program in the Environment, Michigan Law Environmental Law and Policy Program, U-M Museum of Anthropological Archaeology, and the Penny Stamps Distinguished Speakers Series.

Zell Visiting Writers: C.M. Burroughs: Reading and Book Signing @ U-M Museum of Art Stern Auditorium
Oct 17 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

CM Burroughs’ book of poems, The Vital System (Tupelo Press), illuminates what she calls “the protective capability of violence.” In the words of renowned French feminist scholar Hélène Cixous: “Burroughs delves into the ultra-sensitive roots of being; where sufferings and desires take shape, she gathers each breath as yet unheard and leads it to speech.”

Burroughs is an Associate Professor of Poetry at Columbia College Chicago. She has been awarded fellowships and grants from Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, Djerassi Foundation, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Cave Canem Foundation. She has received commissions from the Studio Museum of Harlem and the Warhol Museum to create poetry in response to art installations.

Her poetry has appeared in journals and anthologies including Poetry, Callaloo, jubilat, Ploughshares, VOLT, and Best American Experimental Writing 2015. Her second book, Master Suffering, will be published by Tupelo Press in 2020.

This event is free and open to the public.

The Zell Visiting Writers Series brings outstanding writers to campus each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (BA ’64, LLDHon ’13). For more information, please visit the Zell Visiting Writers Program webpage: https://lsa.umich.edu/writers

Erica Chapman: Teach Me Not to Forget, and Patrick Flores-Scott: American Road Trip @ Nicola's Books
Oct 17 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Local authors Erica Chapman and Patrick Flores- Scott are joining forces for the evening to share their Young Adult titles.

About the Books

Author: Erica Chapman
Title: Teach Me to Forget

Ellery doesn’t want to live anymore.

She’s unable to bear the loss of her sister, or face the rest of her broken family. So, she’s made a plan—bought the gun, arranged for her funeral, and picked the day. Everything has fallen into place. Then, on the day she intends to take her own life, she meets Colter, a boy who recognizes her desperation and becomes determined to stop her.

Ellery won’t be swayed so easily, but as she struggles with her hopelessness it becomes clear Colter has good reasons for his vigilance—deep, personal reasons. And whether Ellery likes it or not, he can’t let go.

Author: Patrick Flores-Scott
Title: American Road Trip

With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the girl of his dreams, life shows promise for Teodoro “T” Avila. But he takes some hard hits the summer before senior year when his nearly perfect brother, Manny, returns from a tour in Iraq with a devastating case of PTSD. In a desperate effort to save Manny from himself and pull their family back together, T’s fiery sister, Xochitl, hoodwinks her brothers into a cathartic road trip.

Told through T’s honest voice, this is a candid exploration of mental illness, socioeconomic pressures, and the many inescapable highs and lows that come with growing up–including falling in love.

About the Authors

Erica Chapman writer of dark, emotional YA novels with a burst of humor, and lighter contemporaries with smart-ass protagonists. Her first novel, TEACH ME TO FORGET (Simon Pulse/S&S) is out now!

Patrick Flores-Scott was a long-time public school teacher in Seattle, Washington. He’s now a reading tutor and early morning writer in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Patrick’s first novel, Jumped In, was named to the 2014 YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults list, a Walden Award finalist, a Washington Book Award winner, an NCSS/CBC Notable Book for the Social Studies, and a Bank Street College Best Books of 2014. His second novel, American Road Trip, received multiple starred reviews and is a 2019 Best Fiction for Young Adults pick, and a TAYSHAS Texas reading list selection.