Current Research

My current projects include:

  • Participation in the research project funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy: “Proyecto excelencia I+D convocatoria 2015 del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad del Gobierno de España.” Project title: “Fuentes medievales y modernas para el estudio de las relaciones transculturales en el Mediterráneo: redacción y transmission.” [Project ID#: FFI2015-63659-C2-1-P (MINECO/FEDER)] (€ 19,600). PI: Cándida Ferrero Hernández; co-PI: Linda Jones; based at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona. Shared among nine project members
  • Participation in the research project the research project funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy: “Proyecto excelencia I+D convocatoria 2015 del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad del Gobierno de España.” Project title: “Legado de Sefarad. La producción material e intelectual del judaísmo sefardí bajomedieval. 2ª parte.” (Project ID#: FFI2015-63700-P.) (€ 44,000). PI: Javier del Barco; based at the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid. Shared among eight project members.
  • A team project to produce the first modern edition of the Pugio fidei (Dagger of Faith) by Ramon Martí, a multi-lingual anti-Jewish polemic from 1278. The other members of the group include Ann Giletti (Rome), Philippe Bobichon (Paris), and head editor Görge Hasselhoff (Bochum). The edition will be part of the series on “Medieval Catalan Philosophers” published by the Catalan press, Obrador Edèndum.
  • Collaboration with Jorge Ledo (Basel) and Cándida Ferrero Hernández (Barcelona) to prepare a critical edition of the Confutación del Alcoran y secta mahometana (Confutation of the Qur’an and the Muhammadan Sect) by Lope de Obregón (Granada, 1555). This work is under contract with Brill for the series “Heterodoxia Iberica.”
  • Work on a monograph, tentatively entitled In the Name of the Father: Translation and Anxiety in Medieval Castile, 1252-1369, that studies the intersection of translation and the politics of dynastic succession in Castile between the reigns of Alfonso X and Pedro I of Castile. This project focuses on the writing at the court of King Alfonso X (ruled 1252-84) and the two generations after his rule, tracing the intersection of power, language, and identity in his compositions and translations from Arabic. I argue that beginning with Alfonso’s reign and continuing for nearly a century after (including Sancho IV, the Libro del Caballero Zifar, Juan Manuel, and Sem Tob de Carrión), translation became in Castilian writing a tool of conquest and polemic, a secular and often political form of supersession. To substantiate this argument, my analysis of the discourse of translation (both translations themselves and discussions of translation by writers) during and immediately following Alfonso’s reign focuses on two different but related concerns: genealogical purity and literary authorship. I argue that these two concerns served as a means to insert political discourse into otherwise non-political texts. While earlier studies have focused on Alfonso’s use of translation as a tool for political power, my study will connect this strategy to literary discourses of genealogy and to Castile’s own troubled dynastic politics.