2019 Winter Courses

Winter 2019 Courses

Interested in taking a food systems course next semester? See below for course offerings for Winter semester 2019! 

**Note that you do not need to minor in Food & Environment or pursue a Graduate Certificate in Sustainable Food Systems to enroll in these courses**

UNDERGRADUATE

Topical Course – Synthetic Courses

ALA 264.002 – Much Depends on Dinner

Monday & Wednesday 4 – 5:30pm | 3 credits | This course will discuss arguments for and against local and organic production, vegetarianism, and GMOs. Readings and lectures will explore the causes and consequences of obesity and what (if anything) should be done about it. Students will visit the archives to learn more about how people ate in the past and discuss the relationship between labor conditions in the food industry and food insecurity in the U.S.

ENVIRON 314, URP 402 – Food Literacy for All

Tuesday 6:30 – 8pm | 2 credits | Structured as an evening lecture series, Food Literacy for All features different guest speakers each week to address diverse challenges and opportunities of both domestic and global food systems. This is a community-academic partnership course that is open to community members and is organized in partnership with the Detroit Food Policy Council and FoodLab Detroit.

ENVIRON/RCIDIV 390 – Environmental Activism: Citizenship in a Republic

Tuesday & Thursday 10 – 11:30am | 3 credits

ENVIRON 465 – Food Literacy Seminar (must be enrolled in ENV 314 – Food Literacy for All)

Friday 1 – 2:30pm | 1 credits | The goal of this discussion seminar is to delve deeper into the topics presented by the speakers at the Tuesday evening “Food Literacy for all.” All students who enroll in this seminar must also be enrolled in “Food Literacy for All.”

AAS 458.012 – Health and African Development

Wednesday 2:30 – 5:30pm | 3 credits

AMCULT 311.006 – Food in American Culture

Monday & Wednesday 8:30 – 10am | 3 credits

ANTHRARC 296 – Local Food Producers

Monday & Wednesday 2:30 – 4pm | 3 credits | What is the story behind our food? How has the way our food is grown and raised changed? This class explores the origins of the food we eat from the earliest farmers to the local food movement. Topics include: heirloom seeds and heritage animals, the relationship between food producers and consumers, and knowledge sharing among local food producers.

ANTHRBIO 364 – Nutrition and Evolution

Monday & Wednesday 2:30 – 4pm | 4 credits | This course will trace the evolution of human nutrition and consider how recent changes in diet, exercise, reproduction, and lifespan affect our fitness in the modern world.

ANTHRCUL 254 – The Anthropology of Food

Monday & Wednesday 11:30 am – 1pm | 4 credits | Every human eats, and yet the styles and meaning of sharing food and drink together vary enormously across cultures. This course introduces students to anthropological approaches to cooking, feasting, fasting, the politics of obesity, and the cultures of fast, slow, artisanal, local and global foods.

BIOLOGY 102 – Practical Botany

Monday & Friday 12 – 1pm | 4 credits

CLARCH/CLCIV 382 Food in the Ancient World: Subsistence and Symbol

Monday & Wednesday 1 – 2:30pm | 3 credits

EARTH 154 – Ocean Resources

Monday & Wednesday 1 – 2:30pm | 3 credits

EARTH/ENVIRON 333 – The Inexhaustible Seas? Marine Resources and Environmental Issues

Tuesday & Thursday 11:30 – 1pm | 4 credits

MOVESCI 241 – Exercise, Nutrition and Weight Control

Tuesday & Thursday 1 – 2:30pm | 3 credits

PUBHLTH 310 – Nutrition in the Life Cycle

Monday & Wednesday 10 – 11am | 3 credits

RCIDIV 350 – Corn in East Quad!

Tuesday & Thursday 10- 11:30am | 1 credits

RCSSCI 360.004 – What’s Food Got to Do with It?

Tuesday & Thursday 4 – 5:30pm | 3 credits

GRADUATE

EAS 524 – Agroecosystem Management

Tuesday & Thursday 1 – 2:30pm | 3 credits | Students will focus on how management impacts carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles from soil-plant to global scales. The course links theory and practice, and domestic and international examples, to discuss the challenges of sustainable food production, with an emphasis on applying ecological principles to soil fertility management.

HMP617 – U.S. Food Policy & Public Health

Thursdays 1-4pm | 3 credits | Students will examine different policy and public health approaches to address problems stemming from the modern US food system within the context of the social/cultural factors that surround food. The course will examine the social and policy determinants of eating behavior, the complex relationship between food and health, and the policy levers available to influence that relationship.

NUTR 633.001- Evaluation of Global Nutrition Programs

Tuesdays & Thursdays 10 – 11:30am | 3 credits | This course will provide students with an understanding of the principles of program evaluation with an emphasis on global nutrition programs. The course will create a space for discussion and practice in which knowledge can be applied to current global nutrition issues through research and critical analysis.

EAS 639.038, URP 610 – Food Literacy for All

Tuesdays 6:30 – 8pm | 2 credits | Structured as an evening lecture series, Food Literacy for All features different guest speakers each week to address diverse challenges and opportunities of both domestic and global food systems. This is a community-academic partnership course that is open to community members and is organized in partnership with the Detroit Food Policy Council and FoodLab Detroit.

EAS 501.057 – Food Literacy for All Seminar

Wednesdays 6:30 – 8pm | 1 credits | The goal of this discussion seminar is to delve deeper into the topics presented by the speakers at the Tuesday evening “Food Literacy for all.” All students who enroll in this seminar must also be enrolled in “Food Literacy for All.”