Winter 2022 Sustainable Food Systems Courses

Interested in taking a food systems course next semester? See below for a sampling of course offerings for the 2022 Winter semester.

**Note that you do not need to minor in Food & Environment or pursue a Graduate Certificate in Sustainable Food Systems to enroll in these courses**

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL

Black World Studies / AAS 358.008 (3 credits)
Jessica Walker | Tu/Th 8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

This course explores the evolution of Black culture through representations of food in radio, advertisements, film,  and television. From combating food stereotypes to centering soul food traditions in contemporary film, we will explore how African Americans have utilized this everyday object to make a case for their visibility on a larger scale. Topics include Black veganism, Mcdonalds, food apartheid, and cultural appropriation.

Exercise, Nutrition and Weight Control / MOVESCI 241 (3 credits)

MOVESCI 241.001 / AES 241.001 (3 credits)
Peter Bodary Tu/Th 1:00PM-2:30PM

Study of body mass regulation including the understanding of food, digestion, metabolism and different intervention strategies such as a diet and exercise.  Students learn assessment and prescription principles and techniques.

Nutrition & Evolution / ANTHRBIO 364 (3-4 credits)
Maureen J Devlin | Tu/Th 11:30 AM-1:00 PM

This class explores the study of the evolutionary basis of contemporary nutritional patterns, the short and long-term effects of industrialization on human biology during development and adulthood.

Camels, Kabobs, and Kahlil Gibran: Arab American Cultural Studies / AMCULT 330 / AMAS 330 (4 credits)
Matthew Stiffler | Tu 5:00 PM – 8:00 PM 

This course investigates Arab American cultural identity through the objects, events, and institutions that have helped to create and maintain Arab American “culture” since the late 19th century. Some of the driving questions of the course are: Is there a specific Arab American “Arabness”? Why is ethnic food an important area of analysis? How and why does Arab American cultural identity change? Students must also enroll in the discussion section (AMAS 330.002 / AMCULT 330.002).

China Food Crisis / ASIAN 351.001 / ENVIRON 351.001 / INTLSTD 351.001 (3 credits)
Miranda Brown | M/W 2:30-4:00 PM 

This course looks at the role that culinary globalization has played in reshaping the Chinese diet, along with its implications for health, the environment, and political identity.

Food in the Ancient World / CLARCH 382.001 / CLCIV 382.001 (3 credits)

Laura Motta |  M/W 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM

This course examines patterns of food production and consumption in the ancient Mediterranean world. Foodways are discussed in relation to socio-cultural and economic developments through time, from hunter-gatherers, and the first farmers, to food redistribution in complex societies and the economic context of the Roman empire.

Hunger in America / PUBHLTH 309.001 (3 credits)
Susan Aaronson; Kate Tu Bauer | 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Food insecurity, or a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life, affects 1 in 8 Americans, and nearly 1 in 3 U of M students. Food insecurity is caused by the intersection of a wide range of factors, from personal cooking skills to neighborhood food access to federal food policies. Fighting food insecurity in the US requires advocates with diverse skills, knowledge, and perspectives working together. The course will integrate community visits; in-classroom, hands-on activities; and instructor-guided seminars to help students understand the experience and impacts of food insecurity across critical life stages of development.

Nutrition Life Cycle / PUBHLTH 310.001 (3 credits)
Olivia Sartorelli Anderson | M/W 10:00 AM -11:00 AM

This course will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.

Food Literacy For All / ENVIRON 314.001 / PUBHLTH 318.001 (2 credits)
Margot Finn, Winona Bynum, Lilly Fink Shapiro | T 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

This course offers a unique opportunity for students to gain an interdisciplinary overview of crises and opportunities in today’s food system through a weekly lecture series bringing high-profile speakers to campus from diverse sectors: academia, grassroots movements, public health, farming, and more.  This course is designed as an academic-community partnership. Students may also enroll in an optional 1 credit discussion section (ENVIRON 305.003)

Environmental & Social Justice Literature / RCDIV 305 (3 credits)
Virginia Murphy | T/TH 10-11:30AM

This course introduces students to the history and principles of the Environmental Justice movement through cultural, literary, scientific, and political analysis. Topics addressed include food sovereignty, land and water rights, and fence-line communities.  Classes include team-based research and reportage contrasting the literature with both scientific and social science approaches. A variety of guest lecturers supplement class assignment

Environmental Activism: Citizenship in a Republic / ENVIRON 390.001 ( 3 credits)
Virginia Murphy  T/TH 1-2:30PM

There is a rich history of American environmental activism that accelerated in the 1960’s and became widespread in the 1970’s, spurred by an increasing awareness of the harmful effects of pollution on public health and the destructive effect of industrial activity on the planet. The Santa Barbara oil spill off the coast of California and the widely-disseminated photos of the Cuyahoga River on fire near downtown Cleveland, Ohio had a profound effect on the American public. These jarring events and others led to an unprecedented wave of environmental lawmaking, spurred, in part, by the actions of the public. At this time in our environmental policy-making and regulations, when so much seems dire, this course may offer a more pragmatic perspective on the battles of environmentalism. 

Environmental Activism will provide an understanding of the history of environmental activism in the United States, the social and political context of the environmental movement, and the tools for effective environmental activism. Students will be exposed to a range of advocacy tools that have shaped the movement, as well as the organizations and individuals who have been leading proponents of meaningful environmental change. Students will actively participate in the discussion of assigned readings of current environmental challenges – – air, land, and water – – and complete independent writing assignments, as well as an end-of-semester project that builds on the themes of the course and advocates on behalf of an issue or perspective using the tools identified throughout the semester.

DAAS In Action / AAS 498.001 ( 3 credits)
Jessica Walker | Tu/Th 11:30 AM-1:00 PM

From urban agriculture to global agribusiness, food is a powerful symbolic and material tool for Black activists, politicians and everyday consumers. Course discussion will focus on the role of anti-blackness in the food system, methods for evaluating its effects, and practices for overcoming it. Readings and case studies explore debates for pay equity within the food industry, the politics and stakes of cultural appropriation, and how food apartheid has shaped urban landscapes. While exploring these and other issues throughout the Diaspora, students will develop a semester-long, hands-on research project which includes a written component.

First-Year Seminar- Archaeology / ANTHRARC 180.001 (3 credits)
Lisa Young | M/W 2:30 PM – 4:30 PM

Food is an essential part of University of Michigan student experience. What did UM students eat in the past and where does the food served on campus today come from?  This seminar examines changes the food system that has fed UM students in Ann Arbor over the past 150 years and the ways that food is helping the University reach its sustainability goals.  We explore all aspects of the food system from production to waste.

This seminar includes a variety of engaged learning experiences, including historical research on early 20th century UM student scrapbooks, a visit to the Campus Farm, and a project with Mdining. Students will have opportunities to learn directly from the people who are working to make the university food system more local and sustainable.

Second Year / GERMAN 232.004 ( 4 credits)
Ramona Uritescu-Lombard | Tu/Th 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Second-Year Course — In this course, students complete the four-term introductory language sequence by selecting one of several “special topics” courses intended as an introduction to the study of an academic discipline, such as Music, Politics and Society, Film, or Science, taught in German. Students should emerge from the course prepared and motivated to do work (or read for pleasure) in German throughout their academic career and beyond. Students are strongly encouraged to arrange their schedules so they can enroll in the section whose topic interests them the most, in order to get the maximum benefit from this course. Interest in the course content is the most effective motivation for language study. More generally, students should be ready by the end of the course to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany.

Environmental Ethics /  ENVIRON 376.001 (3 credits)
Rolf Bouma | Tu/Th 10:00 AM -11:30 AM 

Environmental Ethics-Living Well with Nature — This course explores what we do and why we do what we do to the world around us.  Without ignoring the theoretical, this course will focus on ethics as it bears on practical, everyday things: using energy, eating food, building houses, flying to far-away destinations, hiking in wild places, watching birds….  Our effects are far reaching: climate change, industrial agriculture and CAFOs, pollution and ecological restoration, biodiversity and species extinctions, wilderness, genetic engineering of plants and animals.  We will ask “what is a good way to live in nature?”

The American South / AMCULT 263.001/ HISTORY 262.001 ( 0 credits)
Stephen Berrey | M/W 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM

The American South — This course explores race, culture, and “Southernness” in the twentieth century American South. We consider Southern identities in relation to historical events (such as segregation, the black freedom struggle, New Deal economics, recent Latin American migrations) and cultural elements (such as music, food, religion, sports). Throughout the course, we also pay attention to how the region’s racial and cultural history has been shaped by gender, class, nation, and ethnicity

The American South / AMCULT 263.002/ HISTORY 262.002 ( 4 credits)
Staff | M 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM 

The American South — This course explores race, culture, and “Southernness” in the twentieth-century American South. We consider Southern identities in relation to historical events (such as segregation, the black freedom struggle, New Deal economics, recent Latin American migrations) and cultural elements (such as music, food, religion, sports). Throughout the course, we also pay attention to how the region’s racial and cultural history has been shaped by gender, class, nation, and ethnicity

Practical Botany / BIOLOGY 102.001 ( 4 credits)
Qiu Yin-Long | M/F 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM +lab

Practical Botany — This course is an introductory course about plants and how they are used by people.

Health & Society / PUBHLTH 200.001 (4 credits)
Emily Jean Youatt | W 4:00-5:00 PM 

Health and Society:  Introduction to Public Health — This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of health and health care in the United States – what they are, what determines them, and how they can be altered.  In so doing, the course surveys the field of public health.

Germ Wars, Asthma and the Food Allergy Epidemic / IHS 340.001 (3 credits)
Gary Huffnagle | Tu/Th 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Germ Wars, Asthma and the Food Allergy Epidemic — This course introduces the student to the growing epidemic of severe allergic diseases, such as food allergies. Course lectures and discussions will focus on the advances in immunology and public health that have led to a decrease in infectious diseases but have been associated with an increase in hypersensitivity diseases, such as asthma and food allergies.

Plants and People / ENVIRON 262.001 (3 credits)
John Courtney Benedict | MoWe 10:00AM – 11:30AM

This course examines the relationship between plants, people, and the environment; focusing on economically important plants. Plants are important for survival, aesthetic, and environmental purposes and have had significant impacts on human history, society, and environment. Today plants are critical for our future. Topics include foods, fibers, drugs, and orn

GRADUATE LEVEL COURSES

Food Service Management / NUTR 585.001 (3 credits)
Patricia Ramos | Th 8:00 AM -10:00 AM 

This course examines the principles of food systems management, defying and applying management theories and functions in food and nutrition settings.  Human, material and facility management will be discussed.  Students gain an understanding of the tools available for managing effective and efficient food and nutrition organizations.  Purchasing and inventory techniques will be examined.  Using the foodservice systems model as a guide, it shows students how to transform the human, material, facility and operational inputs of the system into outputs of meals, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction and financial accountability.  This course will cover cost control, methods that are specific to managing food service operations, including food waste and theft.

Nutrition Life Cycle / NUTR 510.001 (3 credits)
Olivia Sartorelli Anderson || M/W 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM 

This course will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.

Food Literacy For All / EAS 639 / ENVIRON 314 / NUTR 518 (2 credits)
Margot Finn | Tu 6:30-8:00 PM

This course offers a unique opportunity for students to gain an interdisciplinary overview of crises and opportunities in today’s food system through a weekly lecture series bringing high-profile speakers to campus from diverse sectors: academia, grassroots movements, public health, farming, and more. Designed as an academic-community partnership, the course is led by a UM faculty member (Finn) with a leader in food justice in Detroit (Bynum), along with the program manager of the UM Sustainable Food Systems Initiative (Fink Shapiro).

Maternal & Child Nutrition / NUTR 540.00 (2 credits)
Suzanne Cole | Fr 8:30 AM- 10:30 AM 

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the nutritional requirements of pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Main topics include: physiologic and metabolic adaptations of pregnancy and lactation, maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation, composition of human milk and formula, feeding practices of infants and toddlers, and the nutrient requirements of infants, children, and adolescents.

Weight Bias and Health / NUTR 622 (2 credits)
Kendrin Sonneville | Tu 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

This course is designed to introduce students to the pervasiveness and consequences of weight bias. Students will be introduced to weigh-inclusive alternatives (e.g. Health at Every Size) to weight-normative approaches common in public health and health care and will examine issues such as size diversity through a social justice lens.

Physical Activity and Nutrition / NUTR 651 (3 credits)
Jeffery Horowitz ; Peter Mancuso  | M/W 8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

Students will learn about the impact of physical activity on the nutrition requirements in active individuals and special populations with chronic disease. Students will also learn how to use exercise and diet modification for weight loss and maintenance through lectures and hands-on activities.

Agroecosystem Management / EAS 524 (3 credits)
Jennifer Blesh | Tu/Th 1:00 PM-2:30 PM

Global food systems have dramatically altered biogeochemical cycles, contributing to climate change and eutrophication of waterways. Growing concern about agriculture’s environmental impacts is increasing demand for citizens, scientists, and policymakers who have in-depth knowledge of more sustainable agroecosystem management approaches. We will focus on how management impacts carbon  (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycles from soil-plant to global scales. The course links theory and practice, and domestic and international examples, to discuss the complex challenges of sustainable food production, with an emphasis on applying ecological principles to soil fertility management. 

Impact Studio: Translating Research Into Practice– Designing the Equitable Enterprise / BA 670 (3 credits)
Gerald Davis, Cat Johnson | Mo 9:00 AM- 12:00 PM

The food service industry may be the oldest industry of all – there were quick-serve takeout restaurants in Pompeii – but technology and the pandemic have radically sped up the change process. 100,000 restaurants closed in the first six months of the pandemic in the US, and 5 million restaurant jobs were lost in March 2020 alone. (That’s roughly the population of Denmark.) New experimental business models are emerging across the US, and many of them portend a disastrous future for labor, with precarious jobs and uncertain incomes. Can it be otherwise? How might we use these same tools to create enterprises that uplift rather than deplete? What would they look like? How would they be funded, whom would they employ, how would they engage suppliers and customers? This is our design challenge.

Advanced Topics in Macronutrient Metabolism / NUTR 830 (2 credits)
Dave Bridges | Fr 8:00 AM- 10:00 AM

This course is an elective designed for research-based molecular nutrition students. It will introduce topics and methods in biochemical and molecular nutrition research. We will use group discussions and individual project to enhance critical analysis skills and learn how to follow in the rapidly advancing field of molecular nutrition.