Calendar

Jul
22
Mon
Emerging Writers Presents: Local Writers LIVE: Sherry Duquet and Fred Reif @ AADL Westgate, West Side Room
Jul 22 @ 7:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Join us for an evening with five local authors doing short readings from their published books, and have a chance to chat and buy their books too!

We’ll kick off the evening with readings by two authors with books published with the library’s Fifth Avenue Press imprint: Brad and Kristin Northrop with their picture book, Akeina the Crocodile and Tracy Gallup with her picture book, Paint the Night.

Meet the authors:

Sherry Duquet with the picture book, Violet the Hugging Octopus. “Violet the Hugging Octopus is a children’s picture book with a message of self-love and self-confidence. Brilliantly illustrated in watercolor, readers meet Violet and her undersea friends as she teaches them the secret to loving themselves. Originally written as a children’s book, Violet has also quickly become a touchstone for older youth and adults who need to be reminded to love themselves.”

Born and raised in Dearborn, Michigan, Sherry Duquet is a graduate of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  Today, she is an author, yoga studio owner, yoga instructor and renowned hugger. She loves working self-hugs into her yoga classes and believes that loving ourselves is a radical idea whose time has come.  She is obsessed with elevating the self-esteem and positivity of men, women and children.

Fred Reif with Tell ’em ’bout the Blues: Interviews and stories about my life in the Detroit & Michigan Blues Scene.

Born and raised in Saginaw, Michigan, Fred Reif, is a musician, manager, writer, researcher, publisher, and collector of American roots music. Fred has re-discovered many American blues musicians and is a world-renowned washboard player.

This is part of the monthly Emerging Writers Workshops, which offer support, learning, and advice for local authors. 

Do you have a completed manuscript? Consider submitting it to the library’s imprint Fifth Avenue Press.

 

Jul
23
Tue
Skazat! Poetry Series: 2019 Ann Arbor Youth Poetry Slam Team @ Sweetwaters
Jul 23 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Readings by members of the 2019 Ann Arbor Youth Poetry Slam Team. The program begins with open mike readings.

Jul
24
Wed
Poetry and the Written Word: Ian Haight @ Crazy Wisdom
Jul 24 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Crazy Wisdom Poetry Series hosted by Joe Kelty, Ed Morin, and David Jibson • Second and Fourth Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m. in the Crazy Wisdom Tea Room • Second Wednesdays are poetry workshop nights. All writers welcome to share and discuss their own poetry and short fiction. Sign up for new participants begins at 6:45 p.m.

Fourth Wednesdays have a featured reader for 50 minutes and then open mic for an hour. All writers welcome to share. Sign up begins at 6:45 p.m. Free. Contact Ed at 668-7523; eacmorso@sbcglobal.net or cwpoetrycircle.tumblr.com.

July 24 • Ian Haight is an author, translator, and editor who graduated from U-M’s Residential College, worked with the UN, was a tenured professor at a Korean university, and now resides in Germany. His book, Celadon, won the First Book Prize in Poetry from Unicorn Press. He communicates an international, spiritually-minded aesthetic. Visit ianhaight.com.

 

 

Poetry Salon: One Pause Poetry @ Argus Farm Stop
Jul 24 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm

ONE PAUSE POETRY SALON is (literally) a greenhouse for poetry and poets, nurturing an appreciation for written art in all languages and encouraging experiments in creative writing.

We meet every Weds in the greenhouse at Argus Farm Stop on Liberty St. The poems we read each time are unified by form (haiku, sonnet, spoken word), poet, time / place (Tang Dynasty, English Romanticism, New York in the 70s) or theme / mood (springtime, poems with cats, protest poems). We discuss the poems and play writing games together, with time for snacks and socializing in between.

Members are encouraged to share their own poems or poems they like – they may or may not relate to the theme of the evening. This is not primarily a workshop – we may hold special workshop nights, but mostly we listen to and talk about poems for the sake of inspiring new writing.

Whether you are a published poet or encountering poetry for the first time, we invite you to join us!

$5 suggested donation for food, drinks and printing costs.

8-10 p.m., Argus Farm Stop greenhouse, 325 W. Liberty. $5 suggested donation. onepausepoetry.org, 707-1284.

 

 

 

Jul
25
Thu
Steve O’Keefe: Set the Page on Fire @ Literati
Jul 25 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

We welcome Steve O’Keefe in support of his book, Set the Page on Fire: Secrets of Successful Writers

Set the Page on Fire: Secrets of Successful Writers is a funny, practical guide to the writing craft built around a four-year road trip interviewing hundreds of authors in the U.S. and Canada. It is loaded with hot tips for writing and getting published. Author Steve O’Keefe will read “In Praise of Manual Typewriters,” his ode to the “letter piano,” and answer questions from writers who want to get published.

Steve O’Keefe graduated from Michigan State University, where he was managing editor of The Red Cedar Review, before landing a job as a book editor for counterculture publisher, Loompanics Unlimited, in Port Townsend, Washington. Steve is the author of two textbooks on Internet Publicity and taught Internet Public Relations at Tulane University in New Orleans for more than a decade before hurricanes convinced him to relocate. Steve currently lives safely in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley where he runs the content marketing firm, Orobora, which hires dozens of writers from all over the world to generate content for clients. His wife, collage artist Deborah O’Keeffe, has won awards from Arts, Beats & Eats; the Crooked Tree Art Festival in Traverse City; and the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair. More information is available at steve-okeefe.com

 

Jul
28
Sun
Ann Arbor Storytellers Guild @ AADL Downtown (3rd floor, Freespace)
Jul 28 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

All invited to listen to guild members swap stories or bring their own to tell, at the AASG monthly meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

Jul
31
Wed
Poetry Salon: One Pause Poetry @ Argus Farm Stop
Jul 31 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm

ONE PAUSE POETRY SALON is (literally) a greenhouse for poetry and poets, nurturing an appreciation for written art in all languages and encouraging experiments in creative writing.

We meet every Weds in the greenhouse at Argus Farm Stop on Liberty St. The poems we read each time are unified by form (haiku, sonnet, spoken word), poet, time / place (Tang Dynasty, English Romanticism, New York in the 70s) or theme / mood (springtime, poems with cats, protest poems). We discuss the poems and play writing games together, with time for snacks and socializing in between.

Members are encouraged to share their own poems or poems they like – they may or may not relate to the theme of the evening. This is not primarily a workshop – we may hold special workshop nights, but mostly we listen to and talk about poems for the sake of inspiring new writing.

Whether you are a published poet or encountering poetry for the first time, we invite you to join us!

$5 suggested donation for food, drinks and printing costs.

8-10 p.m., Argus Farm Stop greenhouse, 325 W. Liberty. $5 suggested donation. onepausepoetry.org, 707-1284.

 

 

 

Aug
1
Thu
Mariama J. Lockington: For Black Girls Like Me @ Literati
Aug 1 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

We’re pleased to partner with 826michigan and the Neutral Zone as we welcome Mariama J. Lockington to our store to read from her book, For Black Girls Like Me. The event is free and open to the public. A signing will follow. 

Makeda June Kirkland is eleven years old, adopted, and black. Her parents and big sister are white, and even though she loves her family very much, Makeda often feels left out. When Makeda’s family moves from Maryland to New Mexico, she leaves behind her best friend, Lena– the only other adopted black girl she knows– for a new life. In New Mexico, everything is different. At home, Makeda’s sister is too cool to hang out with her anymore and at school, she can’t seem to find one real friend.

Through it all, Makeda can’t help but wonder: What would it feel like to grow up with a family that looks like me?

Through singing, dreaming, and writing secret messages back and forth with Lena, Makeda might just carve a small place for herself in the world.

In this lyrical coming-of-age story about family, sisterhood, music, race, and identity, Mariama J. Lockington draws on some of the emotional truths from her own experiences growing up with an adoptive white family. For Black Girls Like Me is for anyone who has ever asked themselves: How do you figure out where you are going if you don’t know where you came from?

Mariama J. Lockington is an adoptee, writer, and nonprofit educator. She has been telling stories and making her own books since the second grade, when she wore short-alls and flower leggings every day to school. Her work has appeared in a number of magazines and journals, including Buzzfeed News Reader, and she is the author of the poetry chapbook The Lucky Daughter. Mariama holds a Masters in Education from Lesley University and Masters in Fine Arts in Poetry from San Francisco State University. She lives in Lexington, KY with her partner and dapple haired dachshund, Henry.

 

Aug
5
Mon
Benjamin Pauli: Flint Fights Back @ Literati
Aug 5 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

We welcome Benjamin Pauli to the store to read and discuss his book, Flint Fights Back, an account of the Flint water crisis which shows that Flint’s struggle for safe and affordable water is part of a broader struggle for democracy. The event is free and open to the public. A book signing will follow. 

When Flint, Michigan, changed its source of municipal water from Lake Huron to the Flint River, Flint residents were repeatedly assured that the water was of the highest quality. At the switchover ceremony, the mayor and other officials performed a celebratory toast, declaring “Here’s to Flint!” and downing glasses of freshly treated water. But as we now know, the water coming out of residents’ taps harbored a variety of contaminants, including high levels of lead. In Flint Fights Back, Benjamin Pauli examines the water crisis and the political activism that it inspired, arguing that Flint’s struggle for safe and affordable water was part of a broader struggle for democracy. Pauli connects Flint’s water activism with the ongoing movement protesting the state of Michigan’s policy of replacing elected officials in financially troubled cities like Flint and Detroit with appointed “emergency managers.”

Pauli distinguishes the political narrative of the water crisis from the historical and technical narratives, showing that Flint activists’ emphasis on democracy helped them to overcome some of the limitations of standard environmental justice frameworks. He discusses the pro-democracy (anti-emergency manager) movement and traces the rise of the “water warriors”; describes the uncompromising activist culture that developed out of the experience of being dismissed and disparaged by officials; and examines the interplay of activism and scientific expertise. Finally, he explores efforts by activists to expand the struggle for water justice and to organize newly mobilized residents into a movement for a radically democratic Flint.

Benjamin J. Pauli is Assistant Professor of Social Science at Kettering University in Flint, Michigan.

Aug
6
Tue
Elizabeth Berg @ Tecumseh District Library
Aug 6 @ 2:45 pm – 4:15 pm

From her website:

“Before I became a writer, I was a registered nurse for ten years, and that was my “school” for writing—taking care of patients taught me a lot about human nature, about hope and fear and love and loss and regret and triumph and especially about relationships–all things that I tend to focus on in my work. I worked as a waitress, which is also good training for a writer, and I sang in a rock band which was not good for anything except the money I made. I was a dramatic and dreamy child, given to living more inside my head than outside, something that persists up to today and makes me a terrible dining partner. I have two daughters and four grandchildren. I live with my partner Bill Young, and our excellent dogs, Gabigail Starletta Buttons, and Austin Ima Riot, and our cat, Gracie Louise Pawplay, near Chicago, even though what I really want to do is live on a hobby farm with lots of animals, including a chicken, I’m dying for a chicken.  . The animals would like you to know they did not get to vote on their names. Or on the food they eat.”