Resources for Faculty

Doctoral students are increasingly aware of the changing labor market for humanities PhDs and the challenges of preparing for multiple possible career paths in and out of the academy. To successfully mentor doctoral students in this twenty-first century environment, departments, graduate programs, and faculty benefit from having available to them an easy-to-access set of resources, toolkits, and reports from the field. The materials assembled here draw on national studies of doctoral career outcomes and disciplinary career resources to assist faculty as they:

Featured Resources

Teaching Career Diversity Through Informational Interviews

  The content and format of career diversity within humanities departments follows no single model. As curriculum committees and graduate program chairs consider whether or not to make coursework or training mandatory, where to situate it within the arc of the program, and how to connect students with resources beyond the unit or department, it can be helpful to identify models implemented at other institutions. One approach – by Dr. Purnima Dhavan, Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Washington’s history department – featured in the July 2018 issue of […]

Humanities for All

A project of the National Humanities Alliance, the Humanities for All database showcases “higher ed-based publicly engaged humanities initiatives, presenting a cross-section of over 1400 undertaken over the past decade from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.” Projects are organized by discipline, theme, geography, and type of institutional and community partners. There’s plenty of material for students investigating a range of humanities options, for scholars interested in models of how to add a public facet to their research, or anybody who wants to learn more about the […]

Mobilizing the Humanities for Diverse Careers

  This piece from Anne Krook encourages humanities graduate departments to focus “on two problems whose fixes are within our own control.” She identifies the problems as as, first, training “students in too narrow a range of dissertation lengths and types” and second “most often implicitly and explicitly devalu[ing] non-academic job outcomes.” Departments and advisers might, instead, consider shorter dissertations, how to “teach students to write for broader audiences in a wider variety of venues,” and how to train “faculty to value and support the non-academic jobs that we know […]

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