Researchers

Craig Smith :

Craig Smith

Coordinator of the UM Living Lab Program
Research Investigator at CHGD
Craig Smith's website

Craig Smith received his doctoral degree in Human Development and Psychology from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2009. He moved to Ann Arbor with his family in 2012, and founded the UM Living Lab Program in the fall of 2012. Craig studies the development of social cognition and behavior in children. Some of his research has focused on how children think about moral transgressions, apologies, confessions, revenge, villains, fairness, and future emotions/desires. Craig enjoys conducting his research in the Living Lab because it allows him to have fun interactions with parents and children, and because he enjoys working with museum/library staff on education initiatives. When not conducting research, Craig is likely to be with his two kids, being goofy and making good-natured mischief.

Margaret Echelbarger :

Margaret Echelbarger

Co-Coordinator of the Living Lab Program
Doctoral Candidate in Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan
Researcher at the Conceptual Development Lab
Margaret Echelbarger's website

Margaret is a doctoral candidate in Developmental Psychology studying children’s judgment and decision-making. Several of her projects have been conducted through the UM Living Lab, which she joined in 2014. A huge proponent of the Living Lab’s educational mission, Margaret enjoys interacting with visitors (children and adults alike!), sharing more about her research, and discussing science more broadly. She graduated from Wellesley College with a BA in Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences and from the University of Kansas with a MA in Child Language.

Kristan Marchak :

Kristan Marchak

Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Psychology & Weinberg Institute for Cognitive Science, University of Michigan

Kristan Marchak graduated from the University of British Columbia, Canada in 2017 with a Ph.D. in Psychology. She is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Michigan, working in the Department of Psychology and the Weinberg Institute for Cognitive Science. She is interested in how children 1) reason about individuals over time and as they experience change and 2) form categories of different kinds of things in the world. Kristan has worked in the Living Lab since 2017 and loves being part of it because she gets to talk to parents and children about research and hopefully inspire a future generation of scientists!

Kimberly Brink :

Kimberly Brink

Doctoral Candidate in Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan
Researcher at the Infant Cognition Project
Kimberly Brink's website

Kimberly Brink graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2010 with a Bachelor's degree in Brain and Cognitive Sciences and is now a graduate student at the University of Michigan. She has been working in the Living Lab since 2014 and is interested in understanding how children think about and interact with technology, especially robots. She works in the Living Lab because she loves sharing her research with parents and kids.

Emily Atkinson :

Emily Atkinson

Language Learning Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Michigan
Emily Atkinson's website

Emily is a Language Learning visiting assistant professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Michigan. She received her Doctoral degree in Cognitive Science in the Department of Cognitive Science at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. Emily has studied child sentence processing and the development of the child parser, and will use the Living Lab to continue her research in language acquisition.

Jasmine M DeJesus :

Jasmine M DeJesus

Postdoctoral Research Fellow in CHGD & Psychology, University of Michigan
Researcher at the Conceptual Development Lab
Jasmine DeJesus' website

Jasmine DeJesus graduated from Harvard in 2007 with a B.A. in Psychology and from the University of Chicago in 2015 with a Ph.D. in Psychology. She is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Michigan, working in the Department of Psychology and the Center for Human Growth and Development. She has been working in the Living Lab since the spring of 2016 and is interested in exploring children's food concepts, developing beliefs about food that may influence children's nutrition knowledge and food concepts. She works in the Living Lab because she loves talking about food with children, parents, and students.

Danielle Labotka :

Danielle Labotka

Doctoral Student in Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan
Researcher at the Conceptual Development Lab

Danielle graduated from the University of Chicago in 2015 with a Bachelor's degree in Comparative Human Development and Anthropology and is now a graduate student at the University of Michigan. She has been working in the Living Lab since 2016 and is interested in understanding how children learn to talk to people from different social groups. She works in the Living Lab because she enjoys getting parents and children to think about their language choices more and hear parents' observations on their children's speech!

Young-eun Lee :

Young-eun Lee

Doctoral Candidate in Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan

Young-eun is a PhD student in Developmental Psychology at the University of Michigan. She got her bachelor's and master's degrees in Psychology at Yonsei University, South Korea. Young-eun is interested in how a sense of justice develops in childhood. She likes learning from children and sharing psychological findings with their families.

Ariana Orvell :

Ariana Orvell

Doctoral Candidate in Social Psychology, University of Michigan
Researcher at the Emotion and Self Control Lab

Ariana is a PhD student in Social Psychology at the University of Michigan. She graduated from Columbia University in 2011 with a Bachelor's degree in Urban Studies and a concentration in Psychology. Ariana has been working in the Living Lab since 2015 because she believes it provides a unique opportunity to share psychology research with kids and their parents. She also loves learning from the children that she works with in the Living Lab and talking with parents about her research, as well. Ariana is interested in how subtle shifts in language and construal impact self-control. In another line of work, she studies how stereotypes influence individuals' identities and motivation.

 

Past Researchers


 
 

Steven O Roberts :

Steven O Roberts

Assistant Professor of Psychology, Stanford University
Steven Robert's website

Steven frames his research with three main questions: How do social group concepts develop in childhood? How do they guide the perception of others? What are some of their real-world consequences? He uses these starting points to explore beliefs about race and multiracial individuals, how concepts of group norms contribute to social cognition, and the implications of cognitive biases for social outcomes. He recruits racially and ethnically diverse samples to examine the effects of group membership on social cognition and use a variety of experimental and survey methods with both child and adult participants. His work is grounded in theories of conceptual development and group-based inequality, and shows that group concepts are early emerging, strengthened across development, shaped by social experiences, inductively powerful, and highly consequential.

Jonathan D Lane :

Jonathan D Lane

Assistant Professor of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University
Principal Investigator of Social Cognition Lab

Jonathan Lane received his PhD from the University of Michigan in 2011, and is currently an Assistant Professor of Psychology & Human Development at Vanderbilt University. His lab's work is focused on children's social-cognitive development--how they learn about other people and how they learn from other people.

Maria M Arredondo :

Maria M Arredondo

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of British Columbia
Maria Arredondo's website

Maria is originally from Argentina and moved to the US when she was 12. Maria graduated from the University of Houston in 2010 with a Bachelor's degree in Psychology and a minor in Sociology. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a PhD in Development Psychology and now works as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of British Columbia. Her research investigates how bilingualism impacts children's cognitive and brain development, as well as how they develop their language skills. Maria has been part of the Living Lab for 3 years, and loves being part of it because she loves talking to parents and kids on how everyday experiences can impact our learning.

Sandra Tang :

Sandra Tang

Research Investigator, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan

Sandra Tang is a Research Investigator in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. She received her training in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology at Boston College, and her program of research focuses on the role of parents in promoting their children’s educational success. She has been working in the Living Lab since 2015 and is interested in understanding how parents parent and what children think about different types of parenting strategies. She works in the Living Lab because she loves working with parents and kids.

Preeti G Samudra :

Preeti G Samudra

Doctoral Candidate in Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan

Preeti Samudra graduated from the University of Michigan in 2008 with a Bachelor's degree in Psychology and Communication Studies. She is now a graduate student at the University of Michigan. She is interested in understanding how children think about the personality traits of characters in stories, and how to improve this understanding. She works in the Living Lab because she loves discussing the research process and psychology more generally with parents and kids.

Neil Lewis, Jr. :

Neil Lewis, Jr.

Doctoral Candidate in Social Psychology, University of Michigan
Researcher at the Motivation & Goal Pursuit Lab
Neil Lewis Jr's website

Neil Lewis, Jr. graduated from Cornell University in 2013 with Bachelor's degrees in Economics and Psychology and is now a PhD Candidate in Social Psychology at the University of Michigan. Neil worked with the Living Lab from 2014-2016, studying how the ways that children think about their future influences their current behavior. He worked with the Living Lab because it was a great opportunity simultaneously conduct research and communicate with parents, teachers, and other relevant audiences about our findings.