Monday, March 26: Interpreting the Visual in History—A Source Workshop with Valerie Kivelson

Please join the European History Workshop on Monday, March 26, 2018 from 6-8 PM in 1014 Tisch Hall for a dinner and discussion:

“Interpreting the Visual in History: A Source Workshop with Valerie Kivelson”

In addition to a methodological discussion regarding visual sources utilized in her work, Dr. Kivelson will also lead the workshop in reading images which participants are analyzing as part of their own research, so please bring along your own!

If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Matt Hershey (mthersh@umich.edu).

Food and drinks will be provided.

Monday, March 12: Alessio Ponzio Paper Discussion

Please join the European History Workshop on Monday, March 12, 2018 from 5:30-7:30 PM in 2713 Haven Hall. We will be discussing Alessio Ponzio’s dissertation chapter draft “Homosexuals in 1950s Italy: Between Repression and Self-Awareness.”

For a copy of the paper or to RSVP, please contact Matt Hershey (mthersh@umich.edu).

Food and drinks will be provided.

Tuesday, February 20: Aidyn Osgood Paper Discussion

Please join the European History Workshop on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 from 6:30-8:30 PM in 1014 Tisch Hall. We will be discussing Aidyn Osgood’s paper “Masculinizing the Female Soldier in French and English Memoirs, 1635-1810.”

For a copy of the paper or to RSVP, please contact Matt Hershey (mthersh@umich.edu).

Food and drinks will be provided.

Wednesday, January 31: Pragya Kaul Paper Discussion

Please join the European History Workshop on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 from 5:30-7:30 PM in 1014 Tisch Hall. We will be discussing Pragya Kaul’s conference paper “Between Colonizer and Colonized: Nationalism, the War, and Refugee Identity Formation in British India” (abstract below).

For a copy of the paper or to RSVP, please contact Matt Hershey (mthersh@umich.edu).

Food and drinks will be provided.

Abstract:

“European Jews seeking refuge in British India in the mid to late 1930’s entered a profoundly colonial space. Here, opposing pro-German and anti-European sentiments on the part of the Indians, and pro-white and anti-German sentiments on the part of the colonial administration abounded. More significantly however, refugees entered a space where the dominating reality was a nationalist struggle for independence, and a counter-struggle to ensure the maintenance of the colony, especially because its resources and armies were fundamental to British survival and success in the Second World War. Using memoirs, oral testimony, and photographs of Jewish refugees in India alongside records of the Government of India and the Council for German Jewry, this paper will explore how this context of colonialism and nationalism determined how Jewish refugees were perceived by, and how they interacted with, the local population of colonists and colonized. Recognising that these contexts saw continual shifts with the progress towards and onset of the war, a chronological approach starting in 1933 and ending in the early 1940s is taken. By emphasizing colonial contexts and struggles in exploring identity formation by Jewish refugees, this paper references and expands upon the current historiographical focus on ‘whiteness’ in the Jewish refugee experience. It argues that that the structures of colonialism, and nationalist rebellions against them, are integral to understanding the perceptions which shaped the space in which Jewish refugees constructed their identities. In making this argument, this paper addresses the lack of imperial contexts in understanding the Holocaust and international response to it despite the centrality of colonized nations and populations to the war.”

Wednesday, November 29: Ron Suny Book Discussion

Please join the European History Workshop on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 from 6-8 PM in 1014 Tisch Hall.  We will be discussing Ron Suny’s brand new book Red Flag Unfurled: History, Historians, and the Russian Revolution (https://www.versobooks.com/books/2578-red-flag-unfurled). 

Dr. Suny has generously agreed to join us for this meeting, so this will be an excellent opportunity to discuss this work directly with the author, as well as fellow graduate students, right at the moment of the Revolution’s centennial. If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Matt Hershey (mthersh@umich.edu).

Food and drinks will be provided. 

Please see the short description from Verso:

“Reflecting on the fate of the Russian Revolution one hundred years after October, Ronald Grigor Suny—one of the world’s leading historians of the period—explores the historiographical controversies over 1917, Stalinism, and the end of “Communism” and provides an assessment of the achievements, costs, losses and legacies of the choices made by Soviet leaders. While a quarter century after the disintegration of the USSR, the story usually told is one of failure and inevitable collapse, Suny reevaluates the promises, missed opportunities, achievements, and colossal costs of trying to build a kind of “socialism” in the inhospitable environment of peasant Russia. He ponders what lessons 1917 provides for Marxism and the alternatives to capitalism and bourgeois democracy.”

Friday, October 27: Citizenship, Nation, Empire–A Roundtable on European Political Culture

Please join the European History Workshop on Friday, October 27, 2017 from 5-7 PM in 2713 Haven Hall for a dinner and discussion:

“Citizenship, Nation, Empire: A Roundtable on European Political Culture”

with Minayo Nasiali (UCLA, Department of History), Kathleen Canning (Michigan, Department of History), and Olga Maiorova (Michigan, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures).

If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Matt Hershey (mthersh@umich.edu).

Food and drinks will be provided.

Monday, September 25: Rita Chin Book Discussion

Please join the European History Workshop on Monday, September 25 from 6-8 PM for our first meeting of the 2017-2018 academic year. We will be discussing Rita Chin’s new book The Crisis of Multiculturalism in Europe: A History (http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10965.html) in 1014 Tisch Hall.

Dr. Chin has generously agreed to join us for the meeting, so this will be an excellent opportunity to discuss this timely work directly with the author, as well as fellow graduate students. If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Matt Hershey (mthersh@umich.edu).

Food and drinks will be provided.

Please see the short description from Princeton University Press:

“In 2010, the leaders of Germany, Britain, and France each declared that multiculturalism had failed in their countries. Over the past decade, a growing consensus in Europe has voiced similar decrees. But what do these ominous proclamations, from across the political spectrum, mean? From the influx of immigrants in the 1950s to contemporary worries about refugees and terrorism, The Crisis of Multiculturalism in Europe examines the historical development of multiculturalism on the Continent. Rita Chin argues that there were few efforts to institute state-sponsored policies of multiculturalism, and those that emerged were pronounced failures virtually from their inception. She shows that today’s crisis of support for cultural pluralism isn’t new but actually has its roots in the 1980s.

Chin looks at the touchstones of European multiculturalism, from the urgent need for laborers after World War II to the public furor over the publication of The Satanic Verses and the question of French girls wearing headscarves to school. While many Muslim immigrants had lived in Europe for decades, in the 1980s they came to be defined by their religion and the public’s preoccupation with gender relations. Acceptance of sexual equality became the critical gauge of Muslims’ compatibility with Western values. The convergence of left and right around the defense of such personal freedoms against a putatively illiberal Islam has threatened to undermine commitment to pluralism as a core ideal. Chin contends that renouncing the principles of diversity brings social costs, particularly for the left, and she considers how Europe might construct an effective political engagement with its varied population.”

Call for Submissions

Hello Everyone! We are currently seeking submissions for our final meeting in April 2017. Papers, Dissertation Chapters, Grant Proposals are all welcome.

Please send submissions to (John Finkelberg) johnrf@umich.edu or  (Matt Hershey (mthersh@umich.edu )

Updated Website Coming Soon

Thank you for visiting our page! We are in the process of updating the website and will have more information soon!

Thursday, May 5th: Visions of Emancipation

Please join the European History Workshop on Thursday, May 5th, in 1014 Tisch Hall (4-6pm) for a special panel discussion:

“Visions of Emancipation: Intellectual Mobility in Modern Poland”

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From the late nineteenth century on, Polish intellectuals embarked on a number of projects involving the educational mobility of the popular classes. Usually these projects were heavily tainted by the intelligentsia’s paternalism toward “the people.” The “people,” however, also engaged in independent forms of autodidacticism. In both cases, their projects were explicitly contested by guards of the existing order. But what did such democratization mean for intellectuals, peasants, and workers, respectively? Was it possible for the popular classes to rise up the social hierarchy? Did workers’ and peasants’ historical circumstances provide them with the opportunities and support necessary to succeed?  How did the old elites – or the intellectuals who facilitated these ideas – react when their projects were put into practice, often with unforeseen consequences? The panel will examine these issues from a number of angles, from global exchanges of correspondence dealing with the education of peasant girls in the early twentieth century, to the autodidacticism of working-class militants around the 1905 Revolution, to the push among intellectuals to open up higher education to the popular classes after WWII.

Featuring:

Kathleen Wroblewski (PhD Candidate in History, University of Michigan)
Wiktor Marzec (PhD Candidate in Sociology, Central European University)
Agata Zysiak (Visiting Scholar, Sociology, University of Michigan)
Commentator: Brian Porter-Szücs (Professor of History, University of Michigan)

Click here for a copy of the program.