People – Splat Lab

Craig Rodriguez-Seijas, PhD
Lab Principal Investigator

Pronouns: He/Him/His
Twitter Handle: @CraigAnthonyRS
SPLAT Lab Twitter Handle: @Haus_of_SPLAT
Email: crseijas@umich.edu

Dr. Rodriguez-Seijas completed his undergraduate training at the University of the West Indies (Trinidad and Tobago), his graduate training at Stony Brook University, and both his predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Brown University (the Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) program in the Alpert Medical School). In 2020, he joined the University of Michigan as an assistant professor and launched the SPLAT Lab.

The SPLAT Lab largely reflects his personal research interests. Empirical questions about the stigma, discrimination, and societal prejudice of marginalized communities are investigated with a range of statistical approaches. However, Dr. Rodriguez-Seijas firmly believes in parsimony: that fancy statistical models are not always needed (the simplest and most effective method often suffices).

Dr. Rodriguez-Seijas is passionate about mentoring students interested in advanced analytic modeling approaches and the nature of psychopathology. These students, regardless of experience, would fit well in the lab. 

Skylar Hawthorne
Lab Manager

Pronouns: She/Her/Hers
Email: skyd@umich.edu
Personal Website: skylarhawthorne.com
Webinar: How to use TransPop Data

Skylar is the SPLAT lab manager, a Mental Health and Substance Abuse MSW student, and an advocate for the LGBTQ community. In 2019, she graduated cum laude from Boston University with degrees in Philosophy, Psychology, and a minor in Music. Then, she went to UofM’s Institute for Social Research to curate, polish, and publish data (including the National Transgender Discrimination Survey) for the world’s largest social science database. Now, she brings her expertise with data and statistics to the SPLAT Lab. When she’s not researching/studying mental health, she’s bolstering her own by going outdoors, running, skiing, or making music (piano and percussion).






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Shayan Asadi

Pronouns: He/Him/His
Email: sasadi@umich.edu
Google Scholar
CV

Shayan is a first-year doctoral student in the Clinical Science area at the University of Michigan. He received his B.A. from York University in 2019. Prior to starting his doctoral studies, he worked as a Research Analyst at CAMH in Toronto, Canada. He is interested in the mechanisms linking stress exposure to adverse outcomes, and how hierarchical dimensional models of psychopathology can better help us understand how stress gets under the skin – with an emphasis on minoritized populations. He aims to leverage cohort studies, ambulatory assessment approaches, and large, nationally representative data to elucidate how and for whom stress affects risk for psychopathology.

Undergraduate Research Assistants


Mason Cox

Pronouns: He/Him/His
Email: mascox@umich.edu

Mason is a double major in psychology and economics. Specifically, he is interested in clinical psychology as well as industrial and organizational psychology. In his free time, he likes playing drums, basketball, or going on hikes.










Barbara Lu

Pronouns: She/Her/Hers
Email: barlu@umich.edu

Barbara is an international student from Taiwan with a major in psychology and a minor in biology. She is interested in the mental health of minority populations and plans to pursue a PhD in clinical psychology. In her free time, she enjoys traveling, playing games, eating good food, and hanging out with friends and family.











Hayley Yu

Pronouns: She/Her/Hers
Email: hayleyyu@umich.edu

Hayley is a psychology student in the Accelerated Master’s Degree Program doing a Master’s Thesis. She works in both the SPLAT Lab and the FAST Lab. She would like to study how to create an effective and cost-efficient substance use disorder treatment for underserved populations. In her free time, Hayley enjoys writing, playing video games, and volunteering with mental health organizations.






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