Welcome

The CASA Lab at the University of Michigan examines school, family, and peer contexts of development – from early adolescence through young adulthood – among diverse youth. We are particularly interested in how identity, socialization, and experiences of (and responses to) racism and xenophobia shape the academic, socioemotional, and civic outcomes of youth of color:

Identity Development in the Context of Racism and Xenophobia: We are interested in how youth make sense of their ethnic/racial identity how they learn about it at home with their families and at school with their friends – as well as how it changes over time. We also examine how ethnic/racial identity is linked to academic and social outcomes across adolescence and young adulthood.

Socialization about Race, Racism, and Immigration Status: We examine how families, schools, and peers are settings in which youth are taught explicitly and implicitly about race and ethnicity – and racism and xenophobia – and how such teachings can support positive youth development in adolescence and young adulthood. We also examine how parents and adolescents come to adopt similar or different cultural values over time.

Experiences of and Resistance to Racism & Xenophobia: We examine youths’ experiences of explicit discrimination or social exclusion due to their ethnicity/race and identify factors that protect youth from negative academic and mental health outcomes when they have such experiences.

CASA Lab Member blog post in Psych Today: “Things No One Told Me about Pursuing a Psychology Ph.D.”

SCoPE work featured in National Geographic article on talking to kids about politics

SCoPE work featured in Telemundo segment about Latinx families’ civic and community engagement

A “Primer” on what developmental science tells us about how and what we teach youth about racism and xenophobia (or copy/paste this link): shorturl.at/uC289

CASEL Webinar on Owning Your Power to Raise Kids Who Challenge Racism


Check out Dr. Rivas-Drake’s blog at Psychology Today: American Me, American We