Lab Director

Luke Hyde

lukehyde@umich.edu

Dr. Hyde is interested in understanding psychopathology and personality, particularly child psychopathology and antisocial behaviors, from a developmental psychopathology standpoint. His research focuses on mechanisms linking early risk to adolescent antisocial behavior, interactions between these risk factors, and subgrouping approaches to identify youth that have similar developmental trajectories. In particular, Dr. Hyde is interested in the role of cognitions, empathy (and callous/unemotional traits), genes (using candidate genes), and neural processes (using fMRI) as they are affected by and interact with harsh environments (e.g., rejecting parenting, dangerous neighborhoods) to increase risk for psychopathology.

Dr. Hyde’s recent program of research has been merging neurogenetics techniques that aim to understand genetic and molecular contributions to neural reactivity with longitudinal developmental studies of at risk children in order to inform our understanding of the development of antisocial behavior, psychopathy, and psychopathology across the lifespan. Thus, he is interested in the role of the environment and biology as they interact overtime to shape behavior.

Dr. Hyde graduated with a B.A. from Williams College where he majored in psychology and religion and graduated with a Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh. At Pitt, Dr. Hyde was in the joint Clinical and Developmental Psychology Program and also completed a concentration in cognitive neuroscience from the Center for Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC, a joint Pitt-Carnegie Mellon University program). Dr. Hyde worked with mentors Daniel S. Shaw and Ahmad R. Hariri during his Ph.D. at Pitt. He also notes Susan B. Campbell and Stephen B. Manuck as major research influences during his graduate studies. Dr. Hyde did his clinical internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinics/University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He enjoys running the MiND Lab and feels fortunate to work with so many wonderful people in the lab. In his spare time, Dr. Hyde likes playing soccer and running, as well as traveling.

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