Senior Staff

Arianna Gard

arigard@umich.edu

Dr. Arianna Gard is a NICHD postdoctoral fellow in the Population Studies Center within the Institute for Social Research. She earned her PhD in Developmental Psychology from the University of Michigan in 2019. Her research examines the neurobiological mechanisms linking poverty and poverty-related adversities to youth sociomeotional development. In addition to training in core developmental theory and methods, affective neuroscience, and developmental psychopathology, she has specialized training in genetics, which she has used to probe individual differences in environmental sensitivity and risk for psychopathology. At the Population Studies Center, Dr. Gard is using large, nationally representative datasets to make population-level inferences about youth neurobiological development. In particular, she is expanding her research evaluating neighborhood effects on adolescent brain development.

 

Graduate Students

Gabby Suarez

glsuarez@umich.edu

Gabby is a first-year graduate student in the Developmental Ph.D. program. Gabby graduated from Williams College in 2017 with a B.A. in Psychology. After graduation, she joined Dr. Nathan Fox’s Child Development Lab at the University of Maryland – College Park as a post-baccalaureate research assistant, where she worked on a number of studies that aimed to understand various components of social and emotional development. Gabby is broadly interested in examining the interactions between environmental and biological factors. In particular, she is interested in assessing the underlying neurobiological mechanisms linking early life adversity and disadvantage to poor behavioral and psychosocial outcomes.

 

Heidi Westerman

wesheidi@umich.edu

Heidi is a first-year graduate student in the Clinical Science Ph.D. program. Heidi received a BA in neuroscience and biology from Wesleyan University. After graduating, she spent two years working as a data manager in the MiND Lab. Heidi is interested in environmental and genetic interactions and the effect they have on neural processes that may lead to later addiction and externalizing psychopathology. In her free time, Heidi enjoys playing volleyball and hiking.

Rachel Tomlinson

raclaire@umich.edu

Rachel is a third year graduate student in the Clinical Science Ph.D program. Rachel received a BS in psychology from Duke University in 2014, with an additional major in biology. After graduating, she managed Elizabeth Brannon’s cognitive development lab at Duke (now Penn) and studied how infants and children learn about numbers and math. Rachel is interested in the pathways through which differences in socioeconomic status affect the development of executive function, particularly inhibitory control. In her free time, Rachel enjoys riding horses, hanging out with her two golden retrievers, and going to 49ers games.

Isaiah Sypher

isy@umich.edu

Isaiah is a third year graduate student in the Clinical Science Ph.D program. After graduating from Wesleyan University in 2013 with a BA in psychology, he spent two years working as a Research Assistant under James Blair at the NIMH’s Section on Affective Cognitive Neuroscience. Isaiah is interested in how early adverse experiences such as exposure to violence and parental maltreatment shape children’s attitudes about aggression. In his free time, Isaiah enjoys traveling, using his mom’s HBO GO subscription, and checking out fun dance parties in Detroit.

Hailey Dotterer

hdotty@umich.edu

Hailey is a third year graduate student in the Clinical Science Ph.D program. Hailey graduated from the University of Michigan in 2014 with a B.A. in psychology. After graduating, she worked as a project coordinator for the Adolescent Wellbeing and Brain Development Study with Dr. Hyde, Dr. Christopher Monk, and Dr. Colter Mitchell, examining how poverty-related stressors affect brain structure and function, as well as behavioral outcomes. Hailey is interested in studying heterogeneity within the externalizing spectrum, including environmental precursors and neural correlates of psychopathic traits, via multi-modal neuroimaging techniques (e.g., connectivity and task-related brain activity) to distinguish between dimensions of antisocial behavior. During her free time Hailey enjoys baking, trying bizarre foods, and fostering kittens.

 

Collaborating Graduate Students

Tyler Hein

heint@umich.edu

Tyler is a sixth year graduate student in the Developmental Psychology Ph.D program working with Dr. Christopher Monk. She received her BS in neuroscience with a minor in chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh in 2013. Tyler’s work examines neurobiological mechanisms linking early adversity and adolescent internalizing disorders. She is also interested in using research to aid in the development of effective programs and social policies, and is currently pursuing training in linking research to practice as a Doris Duke Fellow for the Promotion of Child Well-Being

 

Staff

Lara Stojanov

larastoj@umich.edu

Lara is the MTWiNS Project Coordinator. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a BA in psychology. She plans to pursue a Ph.D in clinical psychology. She is particularly interested in studying child and adolescent populations. Her research interests include understanding the effects of early life adversity on brain development and risk for psychopathology. In her free time, Lara enjoys reading, playing with her dog, and spending time with friends and family.

Jenna Hayes

hajenna@umich.edu

Jenna is a Data Manager. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a BA in psychology and minors in Crime and Justice & American Culture. She also worked in the MiND Lab as an undergraduate research assistant during her junior and senior years. Her research interests include the intersection between psychopathology and the criminal justice system as well as autism. She has spent the last few years as a caregiver for people with special needs. Jenna plans to pursue a PhD in clinical psychology. She enjoys training her overweight cat (Henry) to walk on his leash and feeding him excessive amounts of treats to counteract any progress that he makes.

Emma Rodgers

elrodger@umich.edu

Emma is a Staff Coordinator. She graduated from Wayne State University in Detroit, MI, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology with a minor in Spanish. She has been an active member of many volunteer organizations aimed at strengthening Latino communities in Metro Detroit and spent a semester working closely with at-risk children and families as an intern at The Youth Connection. She currently volunteers in female and male prison facilities as a facilitator with Shakespeare in Prison. Her interests include the intersections of psychology and the criminal justice system. She aims to one day attend graduate school and pursue these interests. In her free time, Emma enjoys instructing indoor cycling classes, going to the public library, and bothering her friends.

Kaitlin Prakken

kprakken@umich.edu

Kaitlin is a Lab Coordinator. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a BA in psychology and Organizational Studies and a minor in Urban Community Studies. She plans to pursue a Ph.D in clinical psychology. Her research interests include resilience in populations at risk for psychopathology and the effects of environmental influences on the development of psychopathology. Kaitlin likes lab bonding, horoscopes, and long walks in the Arb.

 

 

Jared Burton

burtonjz@umich.edu

Jared is a Data Manager. He graduated from Utah Valley University with a BS in psychology and a minor in Biology. He is interested in studying learning, memory, and intelligence. He is interested in studying learning, memory, and intelligence. He loves pasta, statistics, sports, and games – of both the video and board varieties.

Maria Gabriela Eyrich Freile

eyrich@umich.edu

Maria Gabriela (Gaby) is a lab manager. She is a first-generation student that graduated from the University of Florida with a BS in psychology with behavioral and cognitive neuroscience and a BA in sociology. Her research interests include the effects of social and cultural factors on the diagnosis and treatment of personality disorders. She hopes to pursue a Ph.D. in clinical psychology with a focus on these interests. In her free time, she enjoys rooting for Ecuador’s soccer team (even though they never win), drinking too much coffee, and discovering new music.