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conversation about home

Published in Spring 2024 Online Folio            after warsan at a gathering i laugh and say            i don’t believe in nationalism. the first time i go to sudan            i arrive on a travel document, green like the mountains            i’ve never seen, green like the second layer            of the red sea. i’m in a boat with my […]

conversation about home Read More »

Published in Spring 2024 Online Folio            after warsan at a gathering i laugh and say            i don’t believe in nationalism. the first time i go to sudan            i arrive on a travel document, green like the mountains            i’ve never seen, green like the second layer            of the red sea. i’m in a boat with my

jidu (n.): origin, sudanese*

Published in Spring 2024 Online Folio the day my grandfather dies i am fast asleep my mother wakes me up and her face is a wash of grief i wonder what i can say for all the absent men in my life i don’t really remember him, just the wrinkle beneath his left eyebrow, the

jidu (n.): origin, sudanese* Read More »

Published in Spring 2024 Online Folio the day my grandfather dies i am fast asleep my mother wakes me up and her face is a wash of grief i wonder what i can say for all the absent men in my life i don’t really remember him, just the wrinkle beneath his left eyebrow, the

The People of Gehenna

Published in Issue 63.2: Spring 2024 Why We Chose It: Michigan Quarterly Review reader Hank Hietala on why he recommended “The People of Gehenna” by Tom Olali and translated by Richard Prins for the Spring 2024 issue. You can purchase the issue here. “Reader, his name is Eks.” From the first line, Tom Olali’s writing declares itself. This is

The People of Gehenna Read More »

Published in Issue 63.2: Spring 2024 Why We Chose It: Michigan Quarterly Review reader Hank Hietala on why he recommended “The People of Gehenna” by Tom Olali and translated by Richard Prins for the Spring 2024 issue. You can purchase the issue here. “Reader, his name is Eks.” From the first line, Tom Olali’s writing declares itself. This is

everything, everywhere all at once

Published in Spring 2024 Online Folio the basement to crying is laughing. after the movie, my girls & i wand our grief into cups of shai as if it were honey. over tea, yi tells me you are safe in this feeling.             i don’t say to her i have never known safety. instead, i

everything, everywhere all at once Read More »

Published in Spring 2024 Online Folio the basement to crying is laughing. after the movie, my girls & i wand our grief into cups of shai as if it were honey. over tea, yi tells me you are safe in this feeling.             i don’t say to her i have never known safety. instead, i

homegoing

Published in Spring 2024 Online Folio i claim the corner seat on the back of this pickup truck with my uncles whose skins are the color of freshly ground bun and habahan we’re five hundred miles east of the place where the white and blue nile meet i come from a country where all we

homegoing Read More »

Published in Spring 2024 Online Folio i claim the corner seat on the back of this pickup truck with my uncles whose skins are the color of freshly ground bun and habahan we’re five hundred miles east of the place where the white and blue nile meet i come from a country where all we

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