Recent Publications

Books



Gelman, S. A. (Ed.) (2014). Childhood cognitive development: Five-volume set. London: SAGE Publications.

Banaji, M. R., & Gelman, S. A. (Eds.) (2013). Navigating the social world: What infants, children, and other species can teach us. New York: Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199890712.001.0001

Gelman, S. A., Taylor, M G., & Nguyen, S. (2004). Mother-child conversations about gender: Understanding the acquisition of essentialist beliefs. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development. Volume 69, No. 1. Amazon.com

Gelman, S. A. (2003). The essential child: Origins of essentialism in everyday thought. New York: Oxford University Press. Amazon.com

Scholnick, E., Nelson, K., Gelman, S. A., & Miller, P. (Eds.) (1999). Conceptual development: Piaget’s legacy. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Amazon.com

Gelman, S. A., Coley, J. D., Rosengren, K., Hartman, E., & Pappas, A. (1998). Beyond labeling: The role of maternal input in the acquisition of richly-structured categories. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development. Serial No. 253, Vol. 63, No. 1. Amazon.com

Hirschfeld, L. A., & Gelman, S. A. (Eds.). (1994). Mapping the mind: Domain specificity in cognition and culture.Cambridge University Press. Amazon.com

Hirschfeld, L. A., & Gelman, S. A. (2002). Cartografia de la Mente [in 2 volumes]. Barcelona, Spain: Gedisa. [Spanish translation of Mapping the mind.]

Gelman, S. A., & Byrnes, J. P. (Eds.) (1991). Perspectives on language and thought: Interrelations in development.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Amazon.com

Recent Journal Articles and Book Chapters


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Baptista, M., Gelman, S. A., & Beck, E. (in press). Testing the role of convergence in language acquisition, with implications for creole genesis. International Journal of Bilingualism.

Gelman, S. A., & Gottfried, G. M. (in press). Creativity in young children’s thought. In J. C. Kaufman & J. Baer (Eds.), The Cambridge companion to creativity and reason in cognitive development, 2e. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Sánchez Tapia, I., Gelman, S. A., Hollander, M., Manczak, E. M., Mannheim, B., & Escalante, C. (in press). Development of teleological explanations in Peruvian Quechua-speaking and U.S. English-speaking preschoolers and adults. Child Development.

Gelman, S. A., Mannheim, B., Escalante, C., & Sanchez Tapia, I. (in press). Teleological talk in parent-child conversations in Quechua. First Language.

Gelman, S. A., Manczak, E. M., Was, A. M., & Noles, N. S. (2016). Children seek historical traces of owned objects. Child Development, 87(1), 239-255doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12453

Meyer M. & Gelman S. A. (2015). Generic reference is less marked than specific reference in children’s gestures. Journal Of Nonverbal Behavior.  doi.org/10.1007/s10919-015-0220-x

Ho, A. K., Roberts, S. O., & Gelman, S. A. (2015). Essentialism and racial bias jointly contribute to the categorization of multiracial individuals. Psychological Science, 26(10), 1639-1645.  doi.org/10.1177/0956797615596436 

Meyer, M., Gelman, S. A., & Stilwell, S. M. (2015). Frequency and informativeness of gestural cues accompanying generic and particular reference. Language Learning and Development, 11(4), 285-309doi.org/10.1080/15475441.2014.940792 

Sutherland, S. L., Cimpian, A., Leslie, S.-J., & Gelman S. A. (2015). Memory errors reveal a bias to spontaneously generalize to categories. Cognitive Science, 39(5), 1021-1046.  doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12189 

Gelman, S. A., Sánchez Tapia, I.,Leslie, S. J. (2015). Memory for generic and quantified sentences in Spanish-speaking children and adults. Journal of Child Language, 1-14.  doi.org/10.1017/S0305000915000483 

Ware, E. A., & Gelman, S. A. (2015). The importance of clarifying evolutionary terminology across disciplines and in the classroom: A reply to Kampourakis. Cognitive Science, 39(4), 838-841.  doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12197 

Roberts, S. O., & Gelman, S. A. (2015). Do children see in black and white? Children’s and adults’ categorizations of multiracial individuals. Child Development, 1-18. doi:10.1111/cdev.12410

Brandone, A. C., Gelman, S. A., & Hedglen, J. (2015). Children’s developing intuitions about the truth conditions and implications of novel generics versus quantified statements. Cognitive Science, 39(4), 711-738.

Gelman, S. A., Frazier, B. N., Noles, N. S., Manczak, E. M., & Stilwell, S. M. (2015). How Much Are Harry Potter’s Glasses Worth? Children’s monetary evaluation of authentic objects. Journal of Cognition and Development, 16(1), 97-117.

Gelman, S. A., Leslie, S. J., Was, A. M., & Koch, C. M. (2015). Children’s interpretations of general quantifiers, specific quantifiers and generics. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 30(4), 448-461.  doi.org/10.1080/23273798.2014.931591

Gelman, S. A., & Roberts, S. O. (2015). Cognitive science and the cultural challenge. Social Anthropology, 23(2), 208-210.

Gelman, S. A., & Meyer, M. (2014). Generics. In P. J. Brooks & V. Kempe (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Language Development (pp. 235-236). SAGE Publications.

Gelman, S. A., & Meyer, M. (2014). The inherence heuristic: A basis for psychological essentialism? Commentary on Cimpian and Salomon. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 37(5), 490. doi:10.1017/S0140525X13003737

Gelman, S. A., Ware, E. A., Kleinberg, F., Manczak, E. M., & Stilwell, S. M. (2014). Individual differences in children’s and parents’ generic language. Child Development, 85(3), 924-940. doi:10.1111/cdev.12187

Gelman, S. A., Noles, N. S., & Stilwell, S. (2014). Tracking the actions and possessions of agents. Topics in Cognitive Science, 6(4), 599-614. doi:10.1111/tops.12106

Geraghty, K., Waxman, S. R., & Gelman, S. A. (2014). Learning words from pictures: 15- and 17-month-old infants appreciate the referential and symbolic links among words, pictures, and objects. Cognitive Development, 32, 1-11.

Gülgöz, S., & Gelman, S. A. (2014). Children’s recall of generic and specific labels regarding animals and people. Cognitive Development. doi:10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.05.002

Lane, J. D., Harris, P. L., Gelman, S. A., & Wellman, H. M. (2014). More than meets the eye: Young children’s trust in claims that defy their perceptions. Developmental Psychology, 50(3), 865-871. doi:10.1037/a0034291

Legare, C., & Gelman, S. A. (2014). Examining explanatory biases in young children’s biological reasoning. Journal of Cognition and Development, 15(2), 287-303. doi:10.1080/15248372.2012.749480

Noles, N. S., & Gelman, S. A. (2014). You can’t always want what you get: Children’s intuitions about ownership and desire. Cognitive Development, 31(1), 59-68. doi:10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.02.002

Rhodes, M., Gelman, S. A., & Karuza, J. C. (2014). Preschool ontology: The role of beliefs about category boundaries in early categorization. Journal of Cognition and Development, 15(1), 78-93. doi: 10.1080/15248372.2012.713875

Ware, E. A., & Gelman, S. A. (2014). You get what you need: An examination of purpose-based inheritance reasoning in undergraduates, pre-schoolers, and biological experts.  Cognitive Science.

Tare, M., & Gelman, S. A. (2014). “We call it as puppy”: Pragmatic factors in bilingual language choice. In I. Arnon, M. Casilas, C. Kurumada, & B. Estigarribia, (Eds.), Language in interaction, Studies in honor of Eve V. Clark. Trends in Language Acquisition Research, Vol. 12, John Benjamins.

Gelman, S. A. (2013). Concepts in development. In P. D. Zelazo (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of developmental psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.

Brandone, A. C., & Gelman, S. A. (2013). Generic language use reveals domain differences in children’s expectations about animal and artifact categories. Cognitive Development, 28(1), 63-75. doi:10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.09.002

Diesendruck, G., Goldfein-Elbaz, R., Rhodes, M., Gelman, S. A., & Neumark, N. (2013). Crosscultural differences in children’s beliefs about the objectivity of social categories. Child Development, 84(6), 1906-1917. doi:10.1111/cdev.12108

Gelman, S. A. (2013). Artifacts and essentialism. Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 4(3), 449-463. doi:10.1007/s13164-013-0142-7

Gelman, S. A., & Davidson, N. S. (2013). Conceptual influences on category-based induction.  Cognitive Psychology, 66, 327-353.

Gelman, S. A., Meyer, M. A., & Noles, N. S. (2013). History and essence in human cognition: Commentary on Bullot and Reber. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 36(2), 142-143. doi:10.1017/S0140525X12001628

Gelman, S. A., & Rhodes, M. (2013). Development of concepts. In H. Pashler (Ed.), Encyclopedia of the mind. SAGE Publications.

Gelman, S. A., Ware, E. A., Manczak, E. M., & Graham, S. A. (2013). Children’s sensitivity to the knowledge expressed in pedagogical and nonpedagogical contexts. Developmental Psychology, 49(3), 491-504. doi:10.1037/a0027901

Lane, J. D., Wellman, H. M., & Gelman, S. A. (2013). Informant’s traits weigh heavily in young children’s trust in testimony and their epistemic inferences. Child Development, 84, 1253-1268.

Mannheim, B., & Gelman, S. A. (2013). El aprendizaje de los conceptos genéricos entre niños quechuahablantes monolingües. Bulletin de L’Instituto Francés de Estudios Andinos, 42(3), 353-368.

Meyer, M., Leslie, S. J., Gelman, S. A., & Stilwell, S. (2013). Essentialist beliefs about bodily transplants in the United States and India. Cognitive Science, 37(4), 668-710. doi:10.1111/cogs.12023

Ware, E., & Gelman, S. A. (2013). Knowledge acquisition in development. In H. Pashler (Ed.), Encyclopedia of the mind. SAGE Publications.

Ware, E. A., Gelman, S. A., & Kleinberg, F. (2013). The medium is the message: Pictures and objects evoke distinct conceptual relations in parent-child conversations. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 59, 50-78.

Gelman, S. A., Manczak, E. M., & Noles, N. S. (2012). The non-obvious basis of ownership: Preschool children trace the history and value of owned objects. Child Development, 83(5), 1732-1747. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8624.2012.01806.x

Brandone, A. C., Cimpian, A., Leslie, S.-J., Gelman, S. A. (2012). Do lions have manes? For children, generics are about kinds rather than quantities. Child Development, 83, 423-433.

Gelman, S. A., & Rhodes, M. (2012). “Two-thousand years of stasis”: How psychological essentialism impedes evolutionary understanding. In K. S. Rosengren, S. Brem, E. M. Evans, & G. Sinatra, Evolution Challenges: Integrating research and practice in teaching and learning about evolution. New York: Oxford University Press.

Nguyen, S. P., & Gelman, S. A. (2012). Generic language facilitates children’s cross-classification. Cognitive Development, 27, 154-167.

Noles, N. S., & Gelman, S. A. (2012). Preschool children and adults flexibly shift their preferences for auditory versus visual modalities, but do not exhibit auditory dominance. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 112, 338-350.

Noles, N. S., Keil, F. C., Bloom, P., & Gelman, S. A. (2012). Children’s and adults’ intuitions about who can own things. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 12, 265-286.

Frazier, B. N., Gelman, S. A., Kaciroti, N., Russell, J. W., & Lumeng, J. C. (2012). I’ll have what she’s having: The impact of model characteristics on children’s food choices. Developmental Science, 15(1), 87-98.

Gelman, S. A., & Frazier, B. N. (2012). Development of thinking in children. In K. Holyoak & R. Morrison (Eds.),Oxford handbook of thinking and reasoning (pp. 513-528). New York: Oxford.

Gelman, S. A., & Ware, E. (2012). Conceptual development: The case of essentialism. In E. Margolis, S. Stich, & R. Samuels (Eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Cognitive Science (pp. 454-479). Oxford University Press.

Leslie, S., & Gelman, S. A. (2012). Quantified statements are recalled as generics: Evidence from preschool children and adults. Cognitive Psychology, 64(3), 186-214.

Noles, N. S., & Gelman, S. A. (2012). Effects of categorical labels on similarity judgments: A critical analysis of similarity-based approaches. Developmental Psychology, 48, 890-896.

Noles, N. S., & Gelman, S. A. (2012). Disentangling similarity judgments from pragmatic judgments: Response to Sloutsky and Fisher. Developmental Psychology, 48, 901-906.

Tardif, T., Gelman, S. A., Fu, X., & Zhu, L. (2012). Acquisition of generic noun phrases in Chinese: Learning about lions without an ‘-s’. Journal of Child Language, 30, 1-32.

Gelman, S. A., & Legare, C. H. (2011). Concepts and folk theories. Annual Review of Anthropology, 40, 379-398.

Gelman, S. A. & Meyer, M. (2011). Child categorization. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, 2(1), 95-105.

Gelman, S. A., & Noles, N. S. (2011). Domains and naïve theories. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, 2(5), 490-502.

Graham, S. A., Nayer, S. L., & Gelman, S. A. (2011). Two-year-olds use the generic/nongeneric distinction to guide their inferences about novel kinds. Child Development82 (2), 493-507.

Opfer, J. E., & Gelman, S. A. (2011). Development of the animate-inanimate distinction. In U. Goswami (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of childhood cognitive development: 2nd Edition (pp. 213-238). Wiley-Blackwell.

Mannheim, B., Gelman, S. A., Escalante, C., Huayhua, M., & Puma, R. (2011). A developmental analysis of generic nouns in Southern Peruvian Quechua. Language Learning and Development7(1), 1-23.

Meyer, M., Gelman, S. A., & Stilwell, S. M. (2011). Generics are a cognitive default: Evidence from sentence processing. In L. Carlson, C. Hoelscher, & T. F. Shipley (Eds.), Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 913-918). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Tare, M., & Gelman, S. A. (2011). Bilingual parents’ modeling of pragmatic language use in multiparty interactions.Applied Psycholinguistics, 32(4), 761-780

Cimpian, A., Brandone, A. C., & Gelman, S. A. (2010). Generic statements require little evidence for acceptance but have powerful implications. Cognitive Science, 34(8), 1452-1482.

Gelman, S. A., & Brandone, A. C. (2010). Fast-mapping placeholders: Using words to talk about kinds. Language Learning and Development6 (3), 223-240.

Legare, C. H., Gelman, S. A., & Wellman, H. M. (2010). Inconsistency with prior knowledge triggers children’s causal explanatory reasoning. Child Development, 81 (3), 929-944.

Tare, M., & Gelman, S. A. (2010). Can you say it another way? Cognitive factors in bilingual children’s pragmatic language skills. Journal of Cognition and Development11 (2), 137-158.

Cimpian, A., Gelman, S. A., & Brandone, A. C. (2010). Theory-based considerations influence the interpretation of generic sentences. Language and Cognitive Processes, 25, 261-276.

Gelman, S. A. (2010). Generics as a window onto young children’s concepts. In F. J. Pelletier (Ed.). Kinds, things, and stuff: The cognitive side of generics and mass terms. (New Directions in Cognitive Science v. 12.) New York: Oxford University Press.

Gelman, S. A. (2010). Modules, theories, or islands of expertise? Domain-specificity in socialization. Child Development, 81, 715-719.

Rhodes, M., Gelman, S. A., & Brickman, D. (2010). Children’s attention to sample composition in learning, teaching, and discovery. Developmental Science, 13, 421-429.

Tare, M., & Gelman, S. A. (2010). Determining that a label is kind-referring: Factors that influence children’s and adults’ novel word extensions. Journal of Child Language37 (5), 1007-1026.

Brandone, A. C., & Gelman, S. A. (2009). Differences in preschoolers’ and adults’ use of generics about novel animals and artifacts: A window onto a conceptual divide. Cognition, 110, 1-22.

Frazier, B. N., & Gelman, S. A. (2009). Developmental changes in judgments of authentic objects. Cognitive Development, 24, 284-292.

Frazier, B. N., Gelman, S. A., & Wellman, H. M. (2009). Preschoolers’ search for explanatory information within adult-child conversation. Child Development, 80, 1592-1611.

Frazier, B. N., Gelman, S. A.,& Hood, B. (2009).Picasso paintings, moon rocks, and hand-written Beatles lyrics: Adults’ evaluations of authentic objects. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 9,1-14.

Gelman, S. A. (2009). Learning from others: Children’s construction of concepts. Annual Review of Psychology, 60,115-140.

Gelman, S. A. (2009). Essentialist reasoning about the biological world. In A. Berthoz & Y. Christen (Eds.),Neurobiology of “Umwelt”: How living beings perceive the world (pp. 7-16). Springer.

Gelman, S. A., & Waxman, S. R. (2009). Response to Sloutsky: Taking development seriously: Theories cannot emerge from associations alone. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 13, 332-333.

Hollander, M. A., Gelman, S. A., & Raman, L. (2009).Generic language and judgments about category membership:Can generics highlight properties as central?Language and Cognitive Processes, 24, 481-505.

Jayaratne, T. E., Gelman, S. A., Feldbaum, M., Sheldon, J. P., Petty, E. M., & Kardia, S. L. R. (2009).The perennial debate:Nature, nurture, or choice? Black and White Americans’ explanations for individual differences. Review of General Psychology, 13,24-33.

Kushnir, T., Wellman, H. M., & Gelman, S. A. (2009). A self-agency bias in preschoolers’ causal inferences.Developmental Psychology, 45, 597-603.

Legare, C., Wellman, H. M., & Gelman, S. A. (2009). Evidence for an explanation advantage in naïve biological reasoning. Cognitive Psychology, 58,177-194.

Rhodes, M., & Gelman, S. A. (2009). A developmental examination of the conceptual structure of animal, artifact, and human social categories across two cultural context. Cognitive Psychology, 59, 244-274.

Rhodes, M., & Gelman, S. A. (2009). Five-year-olds’ beliefs about the discreetness of category boundaries for animals and artifacts. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 16, 920-924.

Taylor, M. G., Rhodes, M., & Gelman, S. A. (2009). Boys will be boys; cows will be cows: Children’s essentialist reasoning about gender categories and animal species. Child Development, 79, 1270-1287.

Waxman, S. R., & Gelman S. A. (2009). Different kinds of concepts and different kinds of words: What do words do for cognition? In D. Mareschal, P. Quinn, & S. Lea (Eds.), The making of human concepts. Oxford University Press.

Bares, C. B. & Gelman, S. A. (2008).Knowledge of illness during childhood: Making distinctions between cancer and colds. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 32, 443-450.

Bloom, P., & Gelman, S. A. (2008).Psychological essentialism in selecting the 14th Dalai Lama. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 12, 243.

Gelman, S. A., Waxman, S. R., & Kleinberg, F. (2008).The role of representational status and item complexity in parent-child conversations about pictures and objects. Cognitive Development, 23,313-323.

Lumeng, J. C., Cardinal, T. M., Jankowski, M., Kaciroti, N., & Gelman, S. A. (2008). Children’s use of adult testimony to guide food selection. Appetite, 51, 302-310.

Rhodes, M., Gelman, S. A. (2008). Categories influence predictions about individual consistency. Child Development, 79, 1270-1287.

Rhodes, M., Gelman, S. A., & Brickman, D. (2008). Developmental changes in the consideration of sample diversity in inductive reasoning. Journal of Cognition and Development, 9, 112-143.

Smiler, A., & Gelman, S. A. (2008). Determinants of gender essentialism in college students. Sex Roles, 58, 864-874.

Arthur, A. E., Bigler, R. S., Liben, L. S., Gelman, S. A., & Ruble, D. N. (2008). Gender stereotyping and prejudice in young children: A developmental intergroup perspective. In S. R. Levy & M. Killen (Eds.), Intergroup attitudes and relations in childhood through adulthood (pp. 66-86). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Gelman, S. A., Goetz, P. J., Sarnecka, B. S., & Flukes, J. (2008). Generic language in parent-child conversations.Language Learning and Development, 4, 1-31.

Gutheil, G., Gelman, S. A., Klein, E., Michos, K., & Kelaita, K. (2008). Preschoolers’ use of spatiotemporal history, appearance, and proper name in determining individual identity. Cognition, 107, 366-380.

Kushnir, T., Wellman, H. M. & Gelman, S. A. (2008). The role of preschoolers’ social understanding in evaluating the informativeness of causal interventions. Cognition, 107, 1084-1092.

Legare, C. H., & Gelman, S. A. (2008). Bewitchment, biology, or both: The co-existence of natural and supernatural explanatory frameworks across development. Cognitive Science, 32, 607-642.

Raman, L., & Gelman, S. A. (2008). Do children endorse psychosocial factors in the transmission of illness and disgust? Developmental Psychology, 44, 801-813.

Rhodes, M., Brickman, D., & Gelman, S. A. (2008). Sample diversity and premise typicality in inductive reasoning: Evidence for developmental change. Cognition, 108, 543-556.

Gelman, S. A., & Bloom, P. (2007). Developmental changes in the understanding of generics. Cognition, 105, 166-183.

Gelman, S. A., & Frazier, B. (2007). Children’s understanding of authenticity. In N. Galanidou, L. H. Dommasnes (Eds.), Telling children about the past: An interdisciplinary approach (pp. 81-99). International Monographs in Prehistory. Ann Arbor, MI. [published in Greek, 2011]

Gelman, S. A., Heyman, G. D., & Legare, C. H. (2007). Developmental changes in the coherence of essentialist beliefs about psychological characteristics. Child Development, 78, 757-774.

Gelman, S. A., & Raman, L. (2007). This cat has nine lives? Children’s memory for genericity in language.Developmental Psychology, 43, 1256-1268.

Gelman, S. A., & Waxman, S. R. (2007). Looking beyond looks: Comments on Sloutsky, Koos, & Fisher.Psychological Science, 18, 554-555.

Jipson, J. L., & Gelman, S. A. (2007). Robots and rodents: Children’s inferences about living and nonliving kinds.Child Development, 78, 1675-1688.

Liu, D., Gelman, S. A., & Wellman, H. M. (2007). Components of young children’s trait understanding: Inferring trait labels from behaviors and predicting behaviors from trait labels. Child Development78, 1543-1558.

Raman, L., & Gelman, S. A. (2007). Children’s recognition of time in the causes and cures of physical and emotional reactions to illnesses and injuries. British Journal of Psychology, 98, 389-410.

Reynaert, C. C., & Gelman, S. A. (2007). The influence of language form and conventional wording on judgments of illness. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 36, 273-295.

Gelman, S. A. (2006). Early conceptual development. In K. McCartney & D. Phillips (Eds.), Blackwell handbook of early childhood development (pp. 149-166). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Gelman, S. A., & Gottfried, G. M. (2006). Creativity in young children’s thought. In J. C. Kaufman & J. Baer (Eds.),Creativity and reason in cognitive development (pp. 221-243). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Gelman, S. A., & Kalish, C. W. (2006). Conceptual development. In D. Kuhn & R. Siegler (Eds.), Handbook of child psychology, Vol. 2: Cognition, perception and language (pp. 687-733). New York: Wiley. Reprinted in condensed form in R. M. Lerner & W. Damon (Eds.), Developmental psychology: An advanced course.

Gelman, S. A., Taylor, M. G., & Nguyen, S. (2006). Messages implicites ou explicites dans les conversations sur le genre entre mère et enfant. [Implicit versus explicit messages about gender in mother-child conversations].Enfance, 3, 223-250.

Gelman, S. A. (2005). Psychological essentialism in everyday thought. Psychological Science Agenda (APA Online), 19 (5), retrieved June 22, 2011, from http://www.apa.org/science/about/psa/2005/05/gelman.aspx.

Gelman, S. A. (2005). Two insights about naming in the preschool child. In P. Carruthers, S. Laurence, & S. Stich (Eds.), The innate mind: Structure and contents (pp. 198-215). New York: Oxford.

Gelman, S. A., Chesnick, R., & Waxman, S. R. (2005). Mother-child conversations about pictures and objects: Referring to categories and individuals. Child Development, 76, 1129-1143.

Goldin-Meadow, S., Gelman, S. A., & Mylander, C. (2005). Expressing generic concepts with and without a language model. Cognition, 96, 109-126.

Gottfried, G. M., & Gelman, S. A. (2005). Developing domain-specific causal-explanatory frameworks: The role of insides and immanence. Cognitive Development, 20, 137-158.

Raman, L., & Gelman, S. A. (2005). Children’s understanding of the transmission of genetic disorders and contagious illnesses. Developmental Psychology, 41, 171-182.

Ross, B. H., Gelman, S. A., & Rosengren, K. S. (2005). Children’s category-based inferences affect classification.British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 23, 1-24.

Gelman, S. A. (2004). Psychological essentialism in children. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 8, 404-409.

Gelman, S. A. (2004). Cognitive development and language. In L. Nadelman (Ed.), Research manual in child development, 2nd ed. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Gelman, S. A. (2004). Learning words for kinds: Generic noun phrases in acquisition. In D. G. Hall & S. R. Waxman (Eds.), Weaving a lexicon. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Raman, L., & Gelman, S. A. (2004). A cross-cultural developmental analysis of children’s and adults’ understanding of illness in South Asia (India) and the United States. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 4, 293-317.

Sarnecka, B. W., & Gelman, S. A. (2004). Six does not just mean a lot: Preschoolers see number words as specific.Cognition, 92, 329-352.

Gelman, S. A., & Koenig, M. A. (2003). Theory-based categorization in early childhood. In D. H. Rakison & L. M. Oakes (Eds.), Early category and concept development: Making sense of the blooming, buzzing confusion. Oxford University Press.

Gelman, S. A., & Raman, L. (2003). Preschool children use linguistic form class and pragmatic cues to interpret generics. Child Development, 24, 308-325.

Heyman, G., Phillips, A. T., & Gelman, S. A. (2003). Children’s reasoning about physics within and across ontological kinds. Cognition, 89, 43-61.

Gelman, S. A., & Opfer, J. (2002). Development of the animate-inanimate distinction. In U. Goswami (Ed.),Blackwell handbook of childhood cognitive development (pp. 151-166). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Gelman, S. A., Star, J., & Flukes, J. (2002). Children’s use of generics in inductive inferences. Journal of Cognition and Development, 3, 179-199.

Hollander, M. A., Gelman, S. A., & Star, J. (2002). Children’s interpretation of generic noun phrases. Developmental Psychology, 38, 883-894.

Nguyen, S., & Gelman, S. A. (2002). Four- and six-year-olds’ biological concept of death: The case of plants. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 20, 495-513.

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Gelman, S. A., & Taylor, M. G. (2000). Gender essentialism in cognitive development. In P. H. Miller & E. K. Scholnick (Eds.), Developmental psychology through the lenses of feminist theories (pp. 169-190). Routledge.

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Heyman, G., & Gelman, S. A. (2000). Preschool children’s use of trait labels to make inductive inferences. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 77, 1-19.

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