Diversity Recruitment Weekend at UM

Each year the Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan runs a Diversity Recruitment Weekend that is designed to provide undergraduate students from underrepresented groups with an overview of the application process to graduate school and tips to succeed in graduate school. It contains workshops, discussions, faculty meetings, and time to socialize with current UM graduate students and other undergraduate peers.

The Diversity Recruitment Weekend this year is Oct 19-21 2017 and applications are due September 18. Please see further details in the advertisement posted below. Apply here.

The Dantzer Lab is strongly committed to the mission of increasing diversity in STEM fields whether it be at the undergraduate, graduate, or faculty level. We are particularly trying to increase the number of applicants for the Diversity Recruitment Weekend that are interested in Biopsychology Area. Please contact Diversity Recruitment Weekend Flyer if you have any questions or are interested in applying.

A productive summer

As the students return and the teaching commences, it’s worthwhile to look back on the summer as one of productivity. Ph.D. students Sarah Westrick and Anne Sabol were busy doing field work on red squirrels in the Yukon and in Ohio on prairie voles, respectively. Post-doc Tricia Rubi has been busy collecting additional data on her project about the genomic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying mouse range expansion in Michigan. New post-doc Sarah Guindre-Parker (jointly supervised by Andrew McAdam at the University of Guelph) has officially joined the lab group. Finally, Abbie Bristol, an REU student at the University of Michigan Biological Station finished her undergraduate research project on the behavioral responses of mice to variation in predation risk.

My own summer has been productive in lots of field work, collection of new data, and watching new projects grow. It has been productive in the scholarly sense with 11 papers published, in press, or accepted! Writing these papers and working with colleagues on them has been a major highlight and learning experience of my summer.

Community talks in the Yukon

Haines Junction is the “home” community for members of the Kluane Red Squirrel Project. It’s where we acquire fuel, food, and other resources, in addition to other necessities like shower or do laundry. We are lucky to have this welcoming community that also happens to have an interest in the work we do in Kluane. We often give public talks to the community about some of our research. This spring and summer we had a series of these community talks (“Science Nights”) that were highlighted some of the past and recent work on red squirrels, snowshoe hares, or lynx. Ben gave a talk in March 2017 at the beautiful Wanderer’s Inn Hostel about some of our red squirrel research on the consequences of maternal stress and Ph.D. student Sarah Westrick gave one at the Village Bakery in July 2017 (pictured above) about her work on maternal behavior. Thanks to the Haines Junction community for hosting us at these events and having an interest in the work we do!

Welcome new post-doc to the lab

Sarah with a Superb Starling

Sarah Guindre-Parker was awarded a NSERC Post-doctoral Fellowship and will be co-supervised by Andrew McAdam and Ben Dantzer during her work on the Kluane Red Squirrel Project. Sarah comes to the lab from Dustin Rubenstein’s lab at Columbia where she did some very interesting work combining her interests in physiology and cooperative behavior in birds.  Congratulations on the fellowship and welcome Sarah!