Prehistoric Copper Mining in Michigan: The Nineteenth-Century Discovery of “Ancient Diggings” in the Keweenaw Peninsula and Isle Royale

John R. Halsey

AP 99

Explorers in the nineteenth century found many pits and tools along rich copper seams in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula–evidence that prehistoric inhabitants mined copper there for thousands of years. John Halsey, former state archaeologist of Michigan, tells the story of those who discovered the ancient mines in this thorough and engaging tale.

Caribou Hunting in the Upper Great Lakes: Archaeological, Ethnographic, and Paleoenvironmental Perspectives

Elizabeth Sonnenburg, Ashley K. Lemke, John M. O’Shea

M 57

Bringing together American and Canadian scholars of Great Lakes prehistory to provide a holistic picture of caribou hunters, this volume covers such diverse topics as paleoenvironmental reconstruction, ethnographic surveys of hunting features with Native informants in Canada, and underwater archaeological research, and presents a synthetic model of ancient caribou hunters in the Great Lakes region.

Ships and Shipwrecks of the Au Sable Shores Region of Western Lake Huron

John M. O’Shea

M 39

Focusing on an area of coastline particularly known for vessel strandings, this volume includes histories of more than 50 lost vessels; a description of the remains of vessels and wreckage documented during archaeological research; an analysis of shoreline change in the last 150 years; and a model for matching wreckage to lost ships. This book will be of interest to archaeologists, historians, and anyone who loves the Great Lakes.

Plants of the Petén Itza’ Maya: Plantas de los maya itza’ del Petén

Scott Atran, Ximena Lois, Edilberto Ucan Ek’

M 38

The Itza’ Maya of the Petén in Guatemala preside over a unique rainforest biosphere in danger of disappearing. Equally at risk is their own botanical knowledge, from taxonomy to medicinal uses. This volume contains a history of the Petén Itza’ Maya; explanation of Itza’ taxonomy; tables and keys to plant usage; common names in English, Spanish, and several indigenous languages; and much more.

Temples for Cahokia Lords: Preston Holder’s 1955–1956 Excavations of Kunnemann Mound

Timothy R. Pauketat

M 26

Preston Holder, a brilliant iconoclast, excavated these mounds in 1955. Decades later, the excavation still stands as one of the best-documented major excavations of the Cahokia area. This volume, meticulously researched and written, is the book Holder never completed. Pauketat also includes the massive research and theoretical developments that have emerged since 1957.

A Vertebrate Faunal Analysis Coding System, with North American Taxonomy and dBase Support Programs and Procedures (Version 3.3)

Brian S. Shaffer and Barry W. Baker

T 23

The authors present the constructs for a logical and hierarchal vertebrate coding system for use in the analysis of faunal remains from archaeological sites. FACS consists of a series of numeric codes for recording information on 24 attributes for each faunal specimen.

The Foxie Otter Site: A Multicomponent Occupation North of Lake Huron

Christopher C. Hanks

AP 79

In this volume, the author reports on the excavation and interpretation of the Foxie Otter Site, a large archaeological site on Fox Lake in Ontario, Canada. This site, which was used by native people for about 7,000 years, contains one of the longest archaeological records in the Upper Great Lakes.

The Henderson Site Burials: Glimpses of a Late Prehistoric Population in the Pecos Valley

Thomas R. Rocek, John D. Speth

T 18

The Henderson site is a small, late prehistoric pueblo in southeastern New Mexico. It sits on a crest overlooking the Hondo River in Chaves County. The site contains a multiroom structure with two phases of occupation: the first around AD 1200 and the second around AD 1300 to 1400. This volume presents descriptions and analysis of the ten burials found at the Henderson site.

Zooarchaeology of Six Prehistoric Sites in the Sierra Blanca Region, New Mexico

Jonathan C. Driver

T 17

In this volume, Jonathan C. Driver presents the results of his study of faunal remains that represent several prehistoric communities in the Sacramento Mountain area and document the range and proportions of hunted foods in the diet of these communities. Driver’s work complements one of the most important works on the prehistory of this region: Jane Holden Kelley’s The Archaeology of the Sierra Blanca Region of Southeastern New Mexico (1984).

The Garnsey Spring Campsite: Late Prehistoric Occupation in Southeastern New Mexico

William J. Parry and John D. Speth

T 15

In 1977 and 1978, Parry and Speth excavated the Garnsey Spring site, an aboriginal campsite southeast of Roswell, New Mexico. Here they describe their fieldwork and the analysis of the artifacts found at the site, including lithics and ceramics. Pollen analysis is also included.

The Archaeology of the Sierra Blanca Region of Southeastern New Mexico

Jane Holden Kelley

AP 74

In this monumental work, Jane Holden Kelley preserved archaeological data from many important sites in southeastern New Mexico, many of which no longer exist. She also established a basic chronological framework for the upland portion of this area. Sites discussed include Bloom Mound and the Bonnell site, as well as many sites in the Upper Gallo Drainage, the Upper Hondo Drainage, the Upper Macho Drainage, and north of Capitan Mountain.

Lulu Linear Punctated: Essays in Honor of George Irving Quimby

Robert C. Dunnell and Donald K. Grayson

AP 72

Many archaeologists and anthropologists of note contributed chapters to this collection, which pays tribute to archaeologist George Irving Quimby on his 1983 retirement from the University of Washington. James Griffin, Albert Spaulding, Lewis Binford, David Brose, and many more write here about archaeology in the Midwest and other areas of North America. Griffin contributes the first chapter: “George Irving Quimby: The Formative Years.”

An Early Woodland Community at the Schultz Site 20SA2 in the Saginaw Valley and the Nature of the Early Woodland Adaptation in the Great Lakes Region

Doreen Ozker

AP 70

The Schultz site is an Early Woodland site on the Tittabawassee River in Saginaw County, Michigan. In this volume, author Doreen Ozker describes the site: its stratigraphy and plant and faunal remains, as well as ceramics and lithics. She also situates the site in the context of the Early Woodland community. She distinguishes Late Archaic and Early Woodland from each other, and as a result, redefines Early Woodland culture.