Upcoming Workshops

shutterstock_295659875The Library, LSA ISS and ITS collaborate on an enormous wealth of educational and training opportunities!

Check out offerings on the Teaching and Technology Collaborative website.  Examples include:

  • Securing your Data in M+Box
  • Social Media for Academics and the Schools that Love Them
  • Demystifying Creative Commons Licenses
  • Finding Funding for Research and Scholarship
  • Intro to Digital Collections Using Omeka
  • Tech Talk:  An Overview of Emerging Technologies in Higher Ed
  • Digital Documents:  Accessibility Lessons You Never Learned
  • Intro to 3D Printing

And so many more….

Digital Humanities Training is available summer 2017 through University of Texas – Austin.
The Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching Institute (HILT) 2017 will be held June 5–8, 2017, with special events on June 9.  Details and registration at http://www.dhtraining.org/hilt2017.  Courses for 2017 include:
  • GETTING STARTED WITH DATA, TOOLS, AND PLATFORMS
    Starting a digital humanities research project can be quite intimidating. This course is designed to make that process less so by exploring tools and platforms that support digital humanities research, analysis, and publication.
  • WORKING WITH SCALAR
    This 4-day workshop is for scholars and students who wish to work on a Scalar project or publication and seek comprehensive training in the platform and in-depth support with editorial, technical and design decisions.   Scalar is a free, open source authoring and publishing platform designed for scholars writing media-rich, born-digital scholarship.
  • HELP! I’M A HUMANIST! — PROGRAMMING FOR HUMANISTS WITH PYTHON
    This course introduces participants to humanities programming through the use of Python for data acquisition, cleaning, and analysis. The course assumes no prior technical knowledge and will focus on accomplishing basic research tasks. Students should walk away feeling equipped to tackle a variety of typical problems that arise for digital humanists.
  • BLACK PUBLICS IN THE HUMANITIES: CRITICAL AND COLLABORATIVE DH PROJECTS
    Forming reciprocal partnerships between academia and publics realizes a primary goal of calls for social justice in Digital Humanities practices and projects. In this discussion-centric course, we will explore the possibilities for developing collaborative and public-facing digital projects invested in social justice.
  • TEXT ANALYSIS
    This class will examine methods and practices for text analysis. Freely available tools and excellent tutorials have made it easier to apply computational text analysis techniques; however, researchers may still find themselves struggling with how to build their corpus, decide upon a method, and interpret results. We will survey the how and why of variety of commonly used methods (e.g. word distribution, topic modeling, natural language processing) as well as how develop and manage a collection of texts.
  • NEW APPROACHES TO LITERARY ARCHIVES
    Participants will learn fundamentals of digital objects including how data is stored on a variety of legacy and contemporary media, how to access file-level metadata such as file creation and modification times, and how to work with a variety of file systems.
  • HUMANITIES RESEARCH WITH SOUND: INTRODUCTION TO AUDIO MACHINE LEARNING
    Libraries and archives have digitized thousands of hours of historical audio in recent years, including literary performances, radio programs, and oral histories.  Participants will gain skills useful for using sound collections for a range of humanities research questions. By learning the basics of how to discover and identify patterns, search and sift collections of sounds, humanists can unlock new collections of valuable primary source material.
  • INTRODUCTION TO THE TEXT ENCODING INITIATIVE (TEI) FOR HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS
    The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines are a standard defining an XML vocabulary for representing textual materials in digital form. This course will focus on encoding historical primary sources both to give provide context and to support analysis and visualization of features of text relevant to humanities scholars. In this introductory course, participants will focus on documenting provenance of historical materials, recording bibliographic metadata, and developing encoding workflows that identify features of interest.

More information about all the courses can be found at: http://www.dhtraining.org/hilt2017/courses/

Sponsored student scholarships are available for undergraduate and graduate students as well as continuing professionals. http://www.dhtraining.org/hilt2017/important-dates-costs/#scholarships