Prehistoric Copper Mining in Michigan: The Nineteenth-Century Discovery of “Ancient Diggings” in the Keweenaw Peninsula and Isle Royale

John R. Halsey

AP 99

Explorers in the nineteenth century found many pits and tools along rich copper seams in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula–evidence that prehistoric inhabitants mined copper there for thousands of years. John Halsey, former state archaeologist of Michigan, tells the story of those who discovered the ancient mines in this thorough and engaging tale.

Zapotec Monuments and Political History

Joyce Marcus

M 61

Joyce Marcus, curator of Latin American Archaeology at the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropological Archaeology and Robert L. Carneiro Distinguished University Professor of Social Evolution, excavated in Mexico’s Valley of Oaxaca for decades. Here she draws on her own work and that of other scholars to create an encyclopedic, lavishly illustrated work on the origins and use of Zapotec writing.

Cueva Blanca: Social Change in the Archaic of the Valley of Oaxaca

Kent V. Flannery and Frank Hole

M 60

Archaeologists Flannery and Hole excavated a series of Archaic sites in the Valley of Oaxaca, including Cueva Blanca, as part of a project on the prehistory and human ecology of this region of Mexico. This cave yielded artifacts from the Late Pleistocene through the Early Archaic to the Late Archaic.

The Spiro Ceremonial Center: The Archaeology of Arkansas Valley Caddoan Culture in Eastern Oklahoma

James A. Brown

M 29

In Volume I of this two-volume set, James A. Brown reports on and interprets decades of archaeological investigation at the Spiro Ceremonial Center, a major site along the Arkansas River in eastern Oklahoma. In Volume 2, he describes the archaeological collections in detail, covering burials, ceramics, stone tools, pipes, beads, textiles, ornaments, and animal bone. Foreword by James B. Griffin. Contributions by Alice M. Brues, Lyle W. Konigsberg, Paul W. Parmalee, and David H. Stansbery.

Wari Imperialism in Middle Horizon Peru

Katharina J. Schreiber

AP 87

More than 600 years before the Inka empire ruled the Andean region of South American, during the period known as the Middle Horizon, there were two complex societies: the Tiwanaku and the Wari. In this volume, Katharina J. Schreiber explores the problem of the Middle Horizon through archaeological research in two specific areas: the Carhuarazo Valley and the Jincamocco site. Foreword by Jeffrey R. Parsons.

The Behavioral Ecology of Efe Pygmy Men in the Ituri Forest, Zaire

Robert C. Bailey

AP 86

Robert C. Bailey reports on his observations of sixteen Efe Pygmy men in northeastern Zaire. Bailey lived and worked with the men and their families in the northern Ituri Forest from March 1980 to January 1982—his research was part of a multidisciplinary project called the Ituri Project. Bailey presents data on food production, subsistence behaviors, hunting techniques, relationships between hunters and village dwellers, and other aspects of the Efe society. Foreword by John D. Speth.

Prehistoric Food Production in North America

Richard I. Ford, ed.

AP 75

As Richard I. Ford explains in his preface to this volume, the 1980s saw an “explosive expansion of our knowledge about the variety of cultivated and domesticated plants and their history in aboriginal America.” This collection presents research on prehistoric food production from Ford, Patty Jo Watson, Frances B. King, C. Wesley Cowan, Paul E. Minnis, and others.

The Snyders Mounds and Five Other Mound Groups in Calhoun County, Illinois

David P. Braun, James B. Griffin, and Paul F. Titterington

T 13

In the 1940s, Paul F. Titterington, a doctor and avocational archaeologist, excavated several prehistoric burial mounds in Calhoun County, Illinois. In this report, David Braun and James Griffin present Titterington’s research.

The Biological and Social Analyses of a Mississippian Cemetery from Southeast Missouri: The Turner Site, 23BU21A

Thomas K. Black III

AP 68

The Turner site, in southeast Missouri, was a small Mississippian village that was occupied about AD 1300. Along with two nearby sites, Powers Fort and Snodgrass, it is considered to belong to the Powers Phase. In this volume, Black offers a mortuary analysis of burials found at all three sites.

Economic and Social Organization of a Complex Chiefdom: The Halelea District, Kaua’i, Hawaii

Timothy Earle

AP 63

In the early 1970s, Timothy Earle worked with Marshall Sahlins doing archaeological and ethnohistorical research on the Halelea district in Kaua’i, Hawaii. In this volume, Earle reports on his archaeological and historical research on irrigation in this region. He also discusses modern taro agriculture and community organization. Illustrations by Eliza H. Earle.

The Vegetational History of the Oaxaca Valley and Zapotec Plant Knowedge

C. Earle Smith and Ellen Messer

M 10

In Part I of this volume, C. Earle Smith draws on years of survey in the Oaxaca Valley and archaeological discoveries of plant remains in the region to create a portrait of the valley’s original wild vegetation, previous to human settlement. In Part 2, Ellen Messer provides the results of her ethnobotanical study of the Zapotec residents of Mitla, a town in the southern highlands of the Valley of Oaxaca. Over the course of four years, she studied with local residents to learn the names and uses for wild plants and agricultural plants in the area.

For the Director: Research Essays in Honor of James B. Griffin

Charles E. Cleland, ed.

AP 61

In 1975, James B. Griffin retired as director of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology. During his three decades as director and professor, he had become one of the leading archaeologists in North America and had tremendous influence over the next generation of archaeological research. To honor the man and his work, nineteen scholars contributed essays to this volume.

Fabrica San Jose and Middle Formative Society in the Valley of Oaxaca

Robert D. Drennan

M 8

In the early 1970s, Robert D. Drennan excavated the Middle Formative archaeological site Fábrica San José in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico. In this volume he presents the results of the excavations and provides a chronology of Middle Formative ceramics. Appendix on carbonized plant remains by Richard I. Ford.

Las yerbas de la gente: A Study of Hispano-American Medicinal Plants

Text for excerpt:

Karen Cowan Ford

AP 60

Karen Cowan Ford provides a guide to five extensive collections of medicinal plants from the Southwest U.S. and Mexico that are housed at the Ethnobotanical Laboratory (now part of the Archaeobiology Laboratories) at the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropological Archaeology. Includes information on the Spanish and botanical names of the plants, where they were collected, and their historical use.

An Analysis of Effigy Mound Complexes in Wisconsin

William M. Hurley

AP 59

The Effigy Mound tradition of Wisconsin dates to between roughly AD 100 and AD 1400. Its center is in central and southern Wisconsin, with a handful of sites also found in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Michigan. During excavation at two major Effigy Mound sites—the Bigelow site and the Sanders site—William M. Hurley and his crew recorded 56 mounds, 91 features, 3 houses, and 10 prehistoric burials, and uncovered more than 55,000 artifacts.

The Yomut Turkmen: A Study of Social Organization among a Central Asian Turkic-Speaking Population

William Irons

AP 58

The Yomut Turkmen of Central Asia are a nomadic people who migrate seasonally with their flocks. They live in the region where northern Iran, Afghanistan, and southern Turkmenistan meet, east of the Caspian Sea. In this monograph, William Irons describes the Yomut Turkmen’s political structure, kinship system, and social organization.

Middle Mississippi Exploitation of Animal Populations

Bruce D. Smith

AP 57

Bruce D. Smith reports on the faunal remains of seven Middle Mississippi sites in Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri, in the northern part of the Lower Mississippi River Valley. Remains recovered include those from white-tailed deer, raccoon, fish, turkey, rabbits, black bear, and more. The seven sites—the Banks site, the Chucalissa site, the Gooseneck site, the Lilbourn site, Powers Fort, the Snodgrass site, and the Turner site—date to between AD 1000 and 1550.