All Affiliated Faculty & Staff

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College of Literature, Science, and the Arts


Catherine Badgley : Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Research Scientist in the Museum of Paleontology

Catherine Badgley

Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Research Scientist in the Museum of Paleontology

Catherine Badgley's research focuses on the history of global biodiversity and includes extensive studies of ecosystem changes over geologic time, biogeography of modern mammals, and sustainable agriculture.  She lives on an organic farm near Chelsea, Michigan.

Regina Baucom : Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Regina Baucom

Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Regina Baucom's research broadly addresses plant adaptation to regimes of strong human-mediated selection, with special focus on weedy plant adaptation to agriculture. Her research utilizes genomic tools and ecological field experiments to understand the evolutionary trajectory of herbicide resistance, competition, and plant-microbe interactions. Dr. Baucom received her PhD from the Department of Genetics at the University of Georgia in 2006 and, after a stint as a post-doc in Jeff Bennetzen's lab, joined the faculty in the Biological Sciences Department at the University of Cincinnati in 2010. She joined the EEB Dept at University of Michigan in 2013. See here for her EEB faculty profile and here for her lab site.

Monica Dus : Assistant Professor

Monica Dus

Assistant Professor

Monica Dus joined the faculty of the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology at The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor as an assistant professor and head of the Dus lab in 2015.  She received a Ph.D. in Biology from the Watson School of Biological Sciences at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where she studied the role of small noncoding RNAs in transposon control and genome stability with Dr. Gregory Hannon. Her postdoctoral work at the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine uncovered how brain circuits sense nutrients to drive feeding decisions. At the University of Michigan the Dus lab studies how the environment, especially diet, leads to persistent changes in behavior by regulating the expression of genetic information within neurons through neuroepigenetic mechanisms. In addition to the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, Dr. Dus received a NIH Pathway to Independence Award and the Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Award in the Neurosciences; she is also a Rita Allen Milton Cassel Scholar and a NARSAD Young Investigator. Monica Dus teaches BIO305 Genetics F16/17/19/20  ; MCDB421 Neuroepigenetics

mdus@umich.edu
Margot Finn : Lecturer, University Courses Division

Margot Finn

Lecturer, University Courses Division

I teach classes on food and the history and philosophy of liberal education. My classes use interdisciplinary topics like food to help students integrate the many different academic disciplines they encounter in their liberal arts degrees and also connect their academic work to their personal lives. I aim to help students develop both critical thinking skills and more informed perspectives on contemporary food debates by examining multiple perspectives on topics like the ecological impact of Organic vs. conventional agriculture and local vs. imported foods, the biology and culture of fatness, and the history of attempts to reform the U.S. food system. In my research, I examine popular beliefs about food and eating in the U.S. from the 1880s to the present. My current book project, Discriminating Taste: How Class Anxiety Created the American Food Revolution, explores how the contemporary food movement has been shaped by class anxieties created by middle-class income stagnation and declining class mobility since 1980. I also serve as a faculty advisor to the Student Food Co. and blog intermittently at soursaltybittersweet.com.

Ashley Gearhardt : Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology

Ashley Gearhardt

Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology

Ashley Gearhardt, Ph.D., earned her B.A. in psychology from The University of Michigan as an undergraduate. While working on her doctorate in clinical psychology at Yale University, Dr. Gearhardt became interested in the possibility that certain foods may be capable of triggering an addictive process. To explore this further, she developed the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) to operationalize addictive eating behaviors, which has recently been linked with more frequent binge eating episodes in clinical populations, increased prevalence of obesity and patterns of neural activation implicated in other addictive behaviors. Dr. Gearhardt also investigates how advertising for junk food may increase susceptibility to obesity in teens by activating reward regions in the brain.  She has published over 40 academic articles and her research has been featured on media outlets, such as ABC News, Good Morning America, the Today Show, the Wall Street Journal, and NPR.

Kristen Harrison : Professor of Communication Studies and Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies

Kristen Harrison

Professor of Communication Studies and Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies

Kristen (Kris) Harrison received her PhD in 1997 in communication science with a minor in social and developmental psychology from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She is a professor of Communication Studies and Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies at the University of Michigan, as well as Head of the Media Psychology Group at the Research Center for Group Dynamics, Institution for Social Research. While at the University of Illinois, she co-founded the Illinois STRONG Kids Program in 2007 and in 2011 extended this research initiative to Michigan. The STRONG Kids Program is a transdisciplinary examination of family and community predictors of early childhood obesity. Professor Harrison collaborates with investigators from communication, human and community development, food science and human nutrition, economics, kinesiology and community health, social work, medicine, and psychology.

In 2012, she joined the University of Michigan’s Momentum Center as a key investigator studying family predictors of infant and early childhood obesity. She is lead author of the 6-Cs model, an ecological cell-to-culture theoretical model designed to help map multi-level influences on social problems (specifically childhood obesity) over the child’s developmental trajectory. Professor Harrison is currently studying media and marketing influences on child dietary intake and preschoolers’ perceptions of healthy meals using a novel child meal schema measure called the Placemat Protocol. This measure uses lifelike food models in a pretend-play paradigm to capture preschoolers’ understanding of “healthy meals” before they can fully articulate it verbally.

Mark Hunter : Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Mark Hunter

Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Mark Hunter received his bachelor’s degree in 1984 and his doctorate in1988, both from the University of Oxford in England. After serving as a NATO International Fellow and an NSERC International Fellow, he joined the faculty of the University of Georgia in 1995. While at UGA, he served as Professor in the Institute of Ecology and as founding Director of the Center for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes. He joined the University of Michigan in January 2006. His research interests include plant-animal interactions, ecosystem ecology, biodiversity, and population dynamics. His research links population processes with ecosystem processes in terrestrial environments and explores the mitigation of global environmental change.

Professor Hunter has published over 120 research articles and written or edited five books. Media coverage of his research includes The BBC, CNN, CBC, The Times, The Business Standard, The LA Times, Science Podcast, Nature World News, The National Geographic, and National Public Radio/Public Radio International. From 2007 to 2012, he served as the first Director of the Frontiers Master’s Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, which fosters graduate student diversity at the University of Michigan.

Virginia Murphy : Lecturer, Social Theory and Practice Program

Virginia Murphy

Lecturer, Social Theory and Practice Program

Professor Murphy earned her graduate degree in English and American Literature from Georgetown University. Prior to joining the faculty at the Residential College at the University of Michigan, she taught at George Washington University and American University in Washington, DC.

While at American University, Professor Murphy developed AU’s first course in environmental literature and environmental justice. Drawing on inspiration from the Nation’s Environmental Film Festival and American University’s Environmental Film Institute, Murphy incorporated non-fiction, fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as eco-documentary film, to offer her course: A Complex Equation: Stewardship of the Earth in an Industrialized World.

Her work at the University of Michigan has centered on issues of sustainability and social justice. Her courses focus on access to good food and a healthy environment for all people. Professor Murphy is a faculty member of the RC’s Social Theory and Practice program, and a faculty associate of the Program in the Environment. Her courses include ENVIRON/RCIDIV 390: Environmental Activism, ENVIRON 400: American Environmentalism and the Frontier West, RCIDIV 305: The Literature of Environmental and Social Justice, and the FYS: Environmental Literature.

When she’s not teaching, her interests include running, hiking the mountains of Maine, reading, writing poetry, gardening, and cooking amazing food with her family.

Richard Norton : Associate Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, Program in the Environment and College of Literature, Science and the Arts

Richard Norton

Associate Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, Program in the Environment and College of Literature, Science and the Arts

Richard K. Norton serves as chair of the urban and regional planning program, as well as faculty coordinator for the land use and environmental planning concentration for the master of urban planning degree. He also holds a joint appointment as associate professor with the University of Michigan's Program in the Environment, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. He earned his Ph.D. in city and regional planning and his J.D. with honors at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also holds master degrees in public policy studies and environmental management from Duke University.

Dr. Norton teaches and conducts research in the areas of sustainable development, land use and environmental planning, and planning law. He is interested in local governance for land use and development management, particularly as it relates to the theory and practice of urban and regional planning for sustainable development. He contributes actively to the Michigan Association of Planning (MAP) by serving on its planning law committee. Through those efforts he has taken the lead in preparing draft legislation for the Michigan Legislature to reform the state's planning and zoning enabling laws, including reforms adopted by the Legislature in 2006 and 2008. He has also written amicus curiae appellate briefs to the Michigan Court of Appeals and the Michigan Supreme Court on behalf of the American Planning Association and MAP regarding planning and zoning disputes in the state. Prior to completing his graduate studies, Dr. Norton worked in professional practice as a consulting environmental policy analyst and planner in Washington, D.C., and San Francisco, California. Department website here

Scott Page : Professor of Complex Systems, Political Science, and Economics

Scott Page

Professor of Complex Systems, Political Science, and Economics

Scott E Page's research focuses on the role of diversity in social systems. An avid cook, Scott's interests include the interplay between food systems and inequality in health and income.

Sara Soderstrom : Professor of Organizational Studies and Program in the Environment

Sara Soderstrom

Professor of Organizational Studies and Program in the Environment

Sara Soderstrom is an Assistant Professor in Organizational Studies and Program in the Environment at the University of Michigan (UM). She studies individual and organizational responses to the ambiguity and uncertainty surrounding sustainability and how individuals within organizations mobilize others, develop coalitions, and access decision makers when they are implementing sustainability initiatives. She uses a variety of contexts including large corporations, Detroit-based food entrepreneurs, community gardens, and university campuses to explore the intersection of sustainability and organizations. She completed her PhD at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University and a post-doc at the Erb Institute, UM. Prior to her PhD, Sara worked at McKinsey & Company. Sara holds MSE degrees in Chemical and Environmental Engineering and a BSE degree in Chemical Engineering from UM.

capasb@umich.edu
John Vandermeer : Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

John Vandermeer

Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

John Vandermeer has been involved in research and teaching in food and agriculture related topics for the past 40 years.  His research has concentrated on the ecology of the coffee agroecosystem in Mexico, elaborating the complex ecological structures involved in complicated dynamics of the pest control system there.  He has authored 15 books, mainly concerned with agroecosystems and more than 200 publications in theoretical ecology, tropical ecology and agroecology.  He is a founding member of the New World Agriculture and Ecology Group.  Currently he teaches an elementary course (Bio/Environ 101 – Food, energy and the environment) and two advanced courses (EEB 477 -- Field Ecology and EEB 498 – Ecology of agroecosystems). Website

Mark Wilson : Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and of Epidemiology

Mark Wilson

Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and of Epidemiology

Mark L. Wilson's work addresses human health and economic development in the Third World.  Many of these studies evaluate the patterns of social and environmental determinants of diseases, especially those with microbial etiology, and the effectiveness of various interventions aimed at reducing risk.  Food systems generate opportunities for improved nutrition, employment and physical well-being, but also exposure to toxins, infectious pathogens, and dependence on global markets.  This fundamental contradiction, expressed in all intentional environmental changes that are ostensibly aimed at enhancing human welfare and security, is among his research interests.  More information is available at his website.

Lisa C. Young : Lecturer IV, Department of Anthropology

Lisa C. Young

Lecturer IV, Department of Anthropology

I am an anthropological archaeologist interested in the diverse organizational strategies used by small-scale farming communities in arid environments. My area of expertise is the American Southwest. Public outreach and collaborative projects, especially with members of the Hopi Tribe in northeastern Arizona, are an integral part of my work. My most recent project involves reconnecting present-day Native American farmers with information about their heirloom seeds curated in museums using digital technology. This project also provides engaged learning opportunities for students. I am also a year-round supporter of local food producers, and I regularly challenge myself to use as many local ingredients as possible in my cooking.   See here for her website 

Food systems courses taught: Antharc 296: Local Food Producers.  (fall 2016 and winter 2017)

lcyoung@umich.edu

College of Engineering


Greg Keoleian : Professor and Director, Center for Sustainable Systems

Greg Keoleian

Professor and Director, Center for Sustainable Systems

Departmental Profile

Dr. Greg Keoleian is the Peter M. Wege Endowed Professor of Sustainable Systems at the University of Michigan and serves as Director of the Center for Sustainable Systems (CSS). He has appointments as Professor in the School of Natural Resources and Environment and Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.  He earned his PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan in 1987.

His research focuses on the development and application of life cycle models and sustainability metrics to guide the design and improvement of products and technology.   New methods that he has pioneered include life cycle design, life cycle optimization of product replacement, life cycle cost analysis and life cycle based sustainability assessment.  He has led over 70 life cycle projects of diverse systems including analyses of conventional and alternative vehicle technology, renewable energy technologies, buildings and infrastructure, consumer products and packaging, and a variety of food systems.  Over the past two decades he has collaborated with a wide range of businesses across diverse sectors, national labs, and government agencies at the national, state and local level.

He has collaborated with Dr. Marty Heller at CSS of the past dozen years on sustainable foods systems research.  Projects have included a life cycle based sustainability assessment of the US Food System, life cycle assessment of a large scale organic dairy, life cycle assessment of indoor recirculating shrimp farming, life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and water impacts of food systems, and food and packaging waste tradeoffs.  Current research is focused on environmental and nutritional impacts of diet choices and also trade-offs between packaging design and food waste.

Don Scavia : Director of Graham Sustainability Institute, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Natural Resources and Environment

Don Scavia

Director of Graham Sustainability Institute, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Natural Resources and Environment

Don Scavia is the Graham Family Professor of Sustainability and Director of the Graham Sustainability Institute. He also serves as the Special Counsel to the U-M President for Sustainability. In those capacities, he is responsible for engaging the full multidisciplinary assets of the University of Michigan to develop and implement the education, research, and operational goals of its flagship sustainability enterprise, Planet Blue, in support of sustainable communities, ecosystems, and economies from local to global scales.

He is also Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Natural Resources and Environment.  In that capacity, he and his postdocs and students combine numerical models and environmental assessments to improve the understanding of interactions between human activities on land and their impacts on coastal marine and freshwater ecosystems. The work is often used to guide and influence policies associated with agriculture’s impacts on aquatic ecosystems.  Most of their recent work has focused on agriculture and climate impacts on the iconic Gulf of Mexico, Chesapeake Bay, and Great Lakes. His research also supports development and application of Integrated Assessment, a tool that brings together natural systems science, social science, engineering, and environmental policy making.

A recent blog outlines a framing of his current thoughts toward the impacts of industrial agriculture and markets on coastal and Great Lakes ecosystems is here. Links to his research, students, postdocs, and publications can be found here

Jasprit Singh : Professor Emeritus

Jasprit Singh

Professor Emeritus

Along with my interest in technology, I have a great interest in the area of nourishment for the individual and a society that is sustainable. I grew up in New Delhi, India where my parents had moved to after India’s partition. My parents came from farm families and although our farm from my father’s side was lost as it was in Pakistan, I feel fortunate that the farm on my mother’s side is still running and is in our family.

I express my interest in sustainable nourishment by leading a group of undergraduate students to the city of Amritsar in India. The program, “Sustainable Nourishment: Lessons from the Golden Temple,” runs through the Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates (GIEU) at the University of Michigan. At the Harmandir Sahib (called the Golden Temple due to the gold covered central temple), everyday about 60,000 meals are shared by people from all walks of life. Our group explores how this program works where no one is charged for the meal but people contribute voluntarily through money, labor, food, etc. The community meal is called “langar” or anchor and has been ongoing at the Golden Temple since 1604.

I see food from a multi-dimensional point of view. It keeps the physical body healthy, but also builds communities. I feel a multi-dimensional view of food encourages one to eat healthy foods while also preventing one from falling into the trap of eating “only the perfect food”.

I am also very interested in the role technologies of Smartphones and mobile sensors can play in sustainable nourishment. It is understood that nearly half of the world’s food production does not reach a mouth. This arises from the losses that occur during harvesting, distributing, shopping, preparing, etc. Moreover, a majority of the global population over-consumes food which leads to unhealthy bodies while there is still food scarcity around the world. I am very interested in developing Smartphone based technologies that can allow people to have easy conduits to giving to their communities, access to healthy food, education about healthy food and preparation, and use of food to demolish barriers between people.

singh@umich.edu

Ross School of Business


Michael Gordon : Professor of Business Administration

Michael Gordon

Professor of Business Administration

Stamps School of Art & Design


Joe Trumpey : Associate Professor at the Stamps School of Art and Design and the School of Natural Resources and Environment

Joe Trumpey

Associate Professor at the Stamps School of Art and Design and the School of Natural Resources and Environment

Joe Trumpey also served as Director of International Engagement for Art & Design for six years and successfully implemented the University’s first International Experience Requirement for all Art & Design students. He is a faculty associate with the University of Michigan’s African Study Center, Program in the Environment, and the Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum. He currently serves on the Executive Committee for the Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute.

Trumpey earned his A.B in Art and Biology from Wabash College and his M.F.A. in Medical and Biological Illustration from the University of Michigan. Before joining Michigan's faculty in 1994, he was chief medical illustrator and director of graphic arts for the College of Veterinary Medicine at North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

While at U-M, Trumpey created a BFA Science Illustration Concentration / Curriculum that was successfully offered from 1995 to 2006. He also founded and currently directs Michigan Science Art, one of the largest groups of science illustrators working together in North America. Their most notable achievement is the completion of approximately 5,000 illustrations for the award-winning, 17-volume Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia. As a freelance design consultant and illustrator, Trumpey has worked with numerous zoos, museums and publishers across the country including: the Toledo Zoo, the Detroit Zoo, the Smithsonian / National Zoo, the North Carolina Zoo, Houghton Mifflin Publishing, Wolfe Publishing, Lippincot Publishing, Gale / Thompson Publishing, Mosby Publishing, ScienceWorks, Inc., Appleton and Lang Publishing, Glaxo-Welcome Pharmaceuticals, Not A Book Inc., and Stackpole Publishing. Trumpey's teaching focuses on aspects of sustainability and culture, experiential observation, and using creative processes to connect the natural world and society. The cornerstone of his work as an educator is an annual field course, called EcoExplorers, in which students prepare and conduct four weeks of fieldwork at various locations around the world, such as Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Everglades National Park, the Four Corners region, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, and Madagascar. He is a recipient of the University of Michigan’s Undergraduate Teaching Award and has been a TedX speaker.With its emphasis on design, biodiversity, agriculture and ecological sustainability, Trumpey's creative work has been exhibited in a wide variety of venues across the United States and abroad. The depth of his devotion to these issues is evident in the fact that he, his wife and two daughters live and work on a small farm dedicated to their own food production and the preservation of genetic diversity in rare livestock. He designed and built their solar powered, off-grid strawbale home. Website here.

Nicholas Tobier : Associate Professor and Director of National Engagement, Director of the Center for Entrepreneurship in the College of Engineering

Nicholas Tobier

Associate Professor and Director of National Engagement, Director of the Center for Entrepreneurship in the College of Engineering

Nick Tobier is a New Yorker who has transferred much of his affection and sense of street level exploration to Detroit. Nick studied sculpture and landscape architecture, worked as project manager at Storefront for Art & Architecture in NYC for 5 years on projects and later as a designer first with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation/ Bronx Division, and LandWorks Studio, Boston.

Nick’s focus as an artist and designer is with the social lives of public places, both in built structures and events. He has designed and/or activated bus stops, farms, kitchens, boulevards, and has worked within and without municipal structures in Detroit, Tokyo, Toronto, San Francisco.

Nick's focus on food centers in and around Detroit neighborhoods with projects and research on mobile food distribution and small community based businesses and projects including F.O.O.D. (Field of Our Dreams) and Mango-on-a-Stick, a collaboration with Cesar Chavez Academy. Website

School of Public Health


Susan Aaronson :

Susan Aaronson

Olivia Anderson : Clinical Assistant Professor, Nutritional Sciences Department, School of Public Health

Olivia Anderson

Clinical Assistant Professor, Nutritional Sciences Department, School of Public Health

Dr. Olivia Anderson is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Nutritional Sciences Department at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. Anderson is a registered dietitian and earned a MPH in Human Nutrition and a PhD in Environmental Health Sciences. Prior to her appointment in the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Dr. Anderson worked as a research associate at UM’s Center for Research on Learning and Teaching where she focused on development and assessment of novel pedagogical techniques and program/unit evaluation strategies. She teaches a range of nutrition topics including macronutrient metabolism, nutrition in the life cycle, and professional development. Her current research is focused on the development, implementation, and assessment of pedagogy that creates an engaged learning environment for students interested in the Nutritional Sciences.

Barbara Israel : Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, Director of the Detroit Urban Research Center

Barbara Israel

Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, Director of the Detroit Urban Research Center

Barbara A. Israel, MPH, DrPH, received her graduate degrees in public health from the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Israel has published widely in the areas of: the social and physical environmental determinants of health and health inequities; the relationship among stress, social support, control and physical and mental health; and community-based participatory research (CBPR).

Dr. Israel has extensive experience conducting CBPR in collaboration with partners in diverse communities. Since 1995, she has worked together with academic and community partners to establish and maintain the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center. The Center involves multiple NIH and Foundation-funded basic etiologic research and intervention research projects aimed at increasing knowledge and addressing factors associated with health inequities in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. Israel is actively involved in several of these CBPR projects examining and addressing, for example, the social and physical environmental determinants of cardiovascular disease, the environmental triggers of childhood asthma, access to food and physical activity spaces, and capacity building for and translating research findings into policy change.  She is engaged in fostering community-academic partnerships aimed at addressing food sustainability issues in Detroit.

Andrew Jones : Assistant Professor of Nutritional Sciences

Andrew Jones

Assistant Professor of Nutritional Sciences

Andy Jones is a public health nutritionist interested in understanding the influence of food environments on the nutritional status of pregnant women and young children in low-income countries. He has examined the role of agriculture and rural livelihoods in shaping the food security of rural households, the adequacy of maternal and child diets, and the growth and development of infants. Andy also conducts research on the spatial and socio-environmental determinants of the co-occurence of micronutrient deficiencies and overweight in transition populations and within vulnerable individuals. He further examines the nutritional consequences of this "dual burden" phenomenon, especially on birth outcomes and early child growth and development.

Prior to his appointment in the University of Michigan Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Andy worked as a Research Associate in the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University. He has also worked as a consultant for several institutions including the World Bank, the International Food Policy Research Institute, and UNICEF.

Laurie Lachance : Associate Research Scientist in the Dept. of Health Behavior and Health Education, Evaluation Director of the Center for Managing Chronic Disease

Laurie Lachance

Associate Research Scientist in the Dept. of Health Behavior and Health Education, Evaluation Director of the Center for Managing Chronic Disease

During her tenure as Evaluation Director of the Center, Dr. Lachance has provided evaluation and technical assistance for many multi-site projects, including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Allies Against Asthma national program, and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Food & Community initiative. She is has served as member of the advisory council for the Community Health Initiative (Kaiser Permanente), and on the select panel and as a Content Area Expert for creating the Common Community Measures for Obesity Prevention (CDC). Dr. Lachance’s training is in nutritional epidemiology and health behavior/ health education. Her research interest is in the prevention and management of chronic disease. She is particularly interested in health behaviors and their relationship to socioeconomic disparities and racial disparities in health risks. In her current work with the W.K. Kellogg Food & Community program, she is leading the cross-site evaluation for the Food & Fitness community collaboratives in cities across the nation, who are changing policies and infrastructures aimed at creating sustainable food systems and increasing opportunities for healthy, affordable, local food. Dr. Lachance has experience in community-based public health and in using both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Alison Miller : Research Assistant Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education and Assistant Research Scientist at the Center for Human Growth and Development

Alison Miller

Research Assistant Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education and Assistant Research Scientist at the Center for Human Growth and Development

Dr. Alison Miller is a developmental psychologist who studies child bio-behavioral regulation, family processes, and social contextual factors in relation to child health and mental health outcomes. Dr. Miller’s research focuses on basic developmental processes, including self-regulation of emotion, sleep, eating behavior, and neuroendocrine stress responses in young children.  An overarching goal of her work is to apply findings from developmental science to foster positive child health and mental health outcomes. Dr. Miller works with children and families who are at risk for unhealthy outcomes for various reasons, including living with maternal incarceration; in poverty conditions; in high-violence neighborhoods; and in non-optima food environments. For many such projects, she collaborates with community partners ranging from grassroots community-based organizations, to Head Start programs, to school systems.

Obesity is a complex condition influenced by biological, psychological, behavioral and social contextual factors, many of which can be established and identified early in the lifespan. Recent attention has focused on the need for developmental science to inform the study of childhood obesity. Importantly, income related disparities in obesity are identifiable even in early childhood.  Dr. Miller’s work in the Lumeng/Miller Lab brings together these interests across a series of studies.  In collaboration with Dr. Julie Lumeng, their lab is housed at the Center for Human Growth and Development.

Dr. Miller supervises graduate and undergraduate students at the School of Public Health who are interested in nutrition sciences, food systems and sustainability.

Karen Peterson :

Karen Peterson

Amy Shultz : Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, Principal Investigator for Detroit Healthy Environments Partnership

Amy Shultz

Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, Principal Investigator for Detroit Healthy Environments Partnership

Amy J. Schulz was a founding member of the Detroit Healthy Environments Partnership (HEP), a community-based participatory research partnership made up of community-based organizations, health service providers, community residents, and academic researchers.  As PI for HEP, she has been actively engaged in ongoing etiologic and intervention research in Detroit, examining social and environmental determinants of cardiovascular disease, since 2000.

Dr. Schulz has considerable experience working with and facilitating community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships, and is a leading contributor to the literature on engaging community, academic and public health practice partners in participatory research and intervention efforts.  In addition to publications on conceptual frameworks for understanding social determinants of health in urban settings, she conducts etiologic research on the social and environmental (including food, physical activity, social environments and physical environments) contributions to excess cardiovascular risk in low to moderate income urban communities.  In addition, she conducts intervention research focused on promoting physical activity and activity friendly environments in urban communities, and teaches courses on community change and environmental health promotion.  Dr. Schulz served as a member Sustainable Food Systems Cluster Hire proposal-writing-team, and chaired the search committee for the SPH position in 2011.

Mark Wilson : Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and of Epidemiology

Mark Wilson

Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and of Epidemiology

Mark L. Wilson's work addresses human health and economic development in the Third World.  Many of these studies evaluate the patterns of social and environmental determinants of diseases, especially those with microbial etiology, and the effectiveness of various interventions aimed at reducing risk.  Food systems generate opportunities for improved nutrition, employment and physical well-being, but also exposure to toxins, infectious pathogens, and dependence on global markets.  This fundamental contradiction, expressed in all intentional environmental changes that are ostensibly aimed at enhancing human welfare and security, is among his research interests.  More information is available at his website.

Julia Wolfson :

Julia Wolfson

Dr. Wolfson is a mixed-methods health policy researcher whose work focuses on health and social policies and programs related to food and beverage choices, diet quality, and obesity. She is particularly interested in the role of cooking for healthy eating, school and community cooking and nutrition education, and school and community food environments. Current research focuses on the measurement and definition of cooking skills and behavior, food literacy/food agency, implementation of cooking skills education, and changes to the restaurant environment related to menu labeling regulations. The overarching goal of Dr. Wolfson’s work is to conduct interdisciplinary and innovative research that will contribute to social and policy change, help develop effective interventions, create just and sustainable food systems, and ultimately, improve population health. Dr. Wolfson is also committed to translating research findings to the public in a way that generates actionable recommendations for both health behavior and public policy.

After a career as a professional chef in fine dining restaurants, Dr. Wolfson earned her Master’s of Public Policy from the University of Southern California (2012) and PhD in health policy from Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health (2016) where she was a CLF-Lerner fellow at the Center for a Livable Future (2012-2016).

School of Natural Resources and the Environment


Jennifer Blesh : Assistant Professor

Jennifer Blesh

Assistant Professor

Jennifer Blesh is a broadly trained agroecologist who uses interdisciplinary research approaches to understand how different agrifood systems impact environmental quality and social justice. Her ecological research focuses on soil nitrogen and carbon biogeochemical cycles, agroecosystem nutrient management, and legume nitrogen fixation. Current projects include assessing land reform processes in the Brazilian Cerrado for socioecological resilience, and research in the U.S. centered on improving nitrogen retention in farm fields. Her research program pays particular attention to alternative production-consumption relations, and is guided by a pragmatic motivation to support development of more ecologically sustainable and equitable food systems.

Prior to joining SNRE, Jennifer was a post-doctoral fellow hosted by the Federal University of Mato Grosso in Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil, and Cornell University. She earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Cornell University in Soil and Crop Sciences, and a B.S. degree from the University of Georgia in Ecology. Blesh Lab website link

Shannon Brines : Applied Geographer and Lecturer, Manager of the Environmental Spatial Analysis Laboratory

Shannon Brines

Applied Geographer and Lecturer, Manager of the Environmental Spatial Analysis Laboratory

Shannon Brines is interested in agriculture, food systems, public health, land use, sustainable design, and environmental informatics. He consults on a variety of research projects, most notably: multiple projects with the Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health which include neighborhood analyses of food access; and, a new USDA-funded project led by the university which will analyze Food Access In Michigan and includes multiple community NGO partners and educational institutions across the state as collaborators.

Shannon is active in our local food community organizations: currently serving on the Slow Food Huron Valley board (vice-chair), HomeGrown Festival steering committee, Local Food Summit steering committee (co-chair), Greenbelt Advisory Commission (vice-chair), and on the student initiated University of Michigan Sustainable Food Program (UMSFP) Advisory Board. He has also served in the past on the Ann Arbor Public Market Advisory Commission and the Tilian Farm Development Center steering committee. Shannon began authentically growing vegetables and fruits as a child growing up in Dexter and established Brines Farm on that family land in 2004 due to his passion for sustainable, year-round agriculture. He began selling year-round at farmers markets shortly thereafter and offered the area's first fresh produce Winter CSA share program a few years later. In 2012 Shannon was able to purchase a neighboring historical 80 acre farm and immediately began stewarding that land following principles of ecology, restoration agriculture, and permaculture. His farm offers a variety of internship opportunities as well as periodic open houses and volunteer days for the public. Shannon was selected as a member of the US delegation to participate in Terra Madre 2008 in Turin, Italy: a world slow food meeting focused on increasing small-scale, traditional, and sustainable food production.

Victoria Campbell-Arvai : Assistant Research Scientist

Victoria Campbell-Arvai

Assistant Research Scientist

Through my research I seek to understand the role of values, attitudes, and information in individual behavior and decision-making within food, water, natural resource and energy systems. I see research on the human dimensions of environmental problems both as a way to address theoretical questions, and as a way to make policy-relevant recommendations for improving public literacy and engagement around environmental issues, and encouraging and facilitating behaviors that help the environment.  I draw primarily on theories and perspectives from social psychology, e.g., the theory of planned behavior and value-belief-norm theory, and risk communication, e.g., mental models analysis. I also incorporate key insights from behavioral decision research; e.g., descriptive (heuristics and biases) and prescriptive (decision-structuring) models of decision-making. I rely on both qualitative (focus groups and interviews) and quantitative methods (surveys, field and laboratory experiments) to address specific research questions.  

Raymond De Young : Associate Professor of Environmental Psychology and Planning and Co-director of the Workshop on Urgent Transitions

Raymond De Young

Associate Professor of Environmental Psychology and Planning and Co-director of the Workshop on Urgent Transitions

Raymond De Young's life-long involvement in gardening and small-scale farming has led to his involvement in the U-M Sustainable Food Program. He’s a member of the UMSFP Advisory Board and faculty advisor to an SNRE Master’s Project at the campus farm.

His work is motivated by the realization that society must respond to diminishing material and energy abundance while also addressing the climate and ecosystem disruptions caused by its past consumption. This bio-physical reality is inevitable. What is not inevitable, however, is the nature of society’s response. While the resource descent being faced is historic, so too can be the response. Thus his teaching and research focus on three interrelated themes: (1) planning for foundational sustainability by urgently transitioning to the local, (2) motivating environmental stewardship by drawing on a wide range of motives including intrinsic satisfaction and the human pre-occupation with behavioral competence, and (3) since burned out people can neither live sustainably nor heal the planet, maintaining human well-being by using nearby nature as medicine.

He received his Bachelor's (1974) and Master’s (1975) in engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology and holds a Ph.D. (1984) in Urban, Technological and Environmental Planning from the University of Michigan. He is on the editorial review board of Environment and Behavior and Ecopsychology, and he recently co-authored The Localization Reader: Adapting to the Coming Downshift (MIT Press, 2012, with Thomas Princen) which includes a collection of readings with a decidedly agrarian focus that point toward a peaceful and psychologically resilient transition to an era of biophysical limits and societal opportunities.

Jim Diana : Professor, Director of the Michigan Sea Grant College Program

Jim Diana

Professor, Director of the Michigan Sea Grant College Program

Originally from Southern California, Professor Diana received a B.S. in Marine Biology and an M.A. in Biology from California State University, Long Beach in 1974 and 1975. He and his wife Barbara moved to Edmonton, Alberta, where he earned a Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Alberta in 1979. He has been a faculty member in SNRE since July 1979. During that time, Professor Diana has been an assistant, associate, and full professor, a member of the Senate Advisory Committee on University Affairs, Chair and Vice-Chair of the Faculty Senate, a member of the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics, and a Faculty Representative on the Board of Directors of the University of Michigan Alumni Association. He spent eight years as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in SNRE and is the founder (1998) and coach of the University of Michigan Fishing Club.

Professor Diana’s teaching at UM has included a general course in Environmental Sciences for hundreds of undergraduate students, as well as courses in Fishery Science and Aquaculture. He is the author of a textbook, The Biology and Ecology of Fishes, which is widely used in the field. He has advised graduate degrees of over 75 master’s and 9 Ph.D. students and received the University of Michigan Undergraduate Teaching Award in 2004-5. In 2007, SNRE established the Jim Diana Scholarship in Aquatic Ecology.Professor Diana’s research is focused in two main fields: ecology of fishes in the north-central region of the U.S., and the role of fisheries and aquaculture in feeding the world. In the former, he has published broadly on muskellunge, sturgeon, northern pike, yellow perch, walleye, trout, salmon, and many other species. In the aquaculture arena, he has conducted research sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development since the mid-1980s, focusing on sustainability of aquaculture in Southeast Asia. His publications have focused on marine shrimp, tilapia, walking catfish, sahar, and giant river prawns. In addition, he has published several articles on the sustainability of aquaculture and fisheries and their environmental impacts, as well as methods to improve aquaculture system.

Professor Diana is involved in a number of professional societies, including the American Fisheries Society for which he served as President of the North Central Division, as Associate Editor for the Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, and a recipient of the Michigan Chapter’s Justin W. Leonard Award of Excellence. He is a member of the World Aquaculture Society from which he received their Lifetime Achievement Award in 2010. He also serves on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Science Advisory Board.Through Michigan Sea Grant, Professor Diana is involved in education, outreach, and research on the Great Lakes. In recent years, the Michigan program has emphasized helping to develop the economy and quality of life for Michigan’s coastal communities.
The Dianas as a family are dedicated to the University of Michigan. In addition to Jim, his wife Barbara has worked at UM for over 28 years, their son Matthew earned a B.S (1999) and M.S. (2001) in SNRE, and their daughter received her master’s (2006) in SNRE.

Paul Drevnick : Assistant Research Scientist, School of Natural Resources and Environment & UM Biological Station

Paul Drevnick

Assistant Research Scientist, School of Natural Resources and Environment & UM Biological Station

Paul Drevnick is an assistant research scientist at UM, jointly appointed to the Biological Station and the School of Natural Resources and Environment.  His research focus is on nonpoint source pollution that degrades water quality, including sediments, nutrients, and toxics.  For example, in the High Arctic of Canada, Paul studies sources, fate, and effects of mercury in lakes used by Inuit for subsistence harvesting of fish.  Mercury is an issue of food safety and security, as the health of aboriginal populations is intimately linked to healthy ecosystems.

Robert Grese : Professor of Landscape Architecture and Chair of Ecosystem Management, Director of Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum

Robert Grese

Professor of Landscape Architecture and Chair of Ecosystem Management, Director of Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum

Robert Grese grew up in Tennessee and has taught landscape architecture at the University of Michigan since 1986. He is a strong advocate of ecologically-based design and has helped in establishing the Campus Farm at Matthaei Botanical Gardens.

Martin Heller : Research Specialist with the Center for Sustainable Systems

Martin Heller

Research Specialist with the Center for Sustainable Systems

Martin Heller most recent research interest involves integrating nutritional information into environmental impact assessments of food and diet.  He has conducted life cycle assessment studies of short rotation woody biomass energy crops (upstate NY DOE willow demonstration project), a large-scale vertically integrated US organic dairy (Aurora Organic Dairy), and as part of an international team, a comprehensive, spatially-explicit study of US dairy production for Dairy Research Institute.  He also developed a seminal report onLife Cycle-Based Sustainability Indicators for Assessment of the U. S. Food System.  As a researcher at theC.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems at MSU, Marty investigated the ecological services provided by pasture-based and confinement-based dairies, and developed a “community food profile” intended to frame for a general audience the opportunities of a community-based food system.  He received a BS in chemical engineering from Michigan State and a PhD, also in chemical engineering, at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Marty has spent much of the past 10 years growing organic vegetables, starting and managing market farms/CSAs.  Through a local non-profit, he is currently developing a Farmer Residency program to assist new farmers in gaining farm management experience.  He grew up on a traditional livestock farm in southeast Michigan.  

Mark Hunter : Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Mark Hunter

Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Mark Hunter received his bachelor’s degree in 1984 and his doctorate in1988, both from the University of Oxford in England. After serving as a NATO International Fellow and an NSERC International Fellow, he joined the faculty of the University of Georgia in 1995. While at UGA, he served as Professor in the Institute of Ecology and as founding Director of the Center for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes. He joined the University of Michigan in January 2006. His research interests include plant-animal interactions, ecosystem ecology, biodiversity, and population dynamics. His research links population processes with ecosystem processes in terrestrial environments and explores the mitigation of global environmental change.

Professor Hunter has published over 120 research articles and written or edited five books. Media coverage of his research includes The BBC, CNN, CBC, The Times, The Business Standard, The LA Times, Science Podcast, Nature World News, The National Geographic, and National Public Radio/Public Radio International. From 2007 to 2012, he served as the first Director of the Frontiers Master’s Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, which fosters graduate student diversity at the University of Michigan.

MaryCarol Hunter : Associate Professor

MaryCarol Hunter

Associate Professor

As a landscape architect and ecologist, my research program encompasses social, psychological and ecological aspects of sustainable urban design.

Foundational to my current research and teaching is the goal to design urban spaces to better support wellbeing. My seminar in Urban Agriculture brings all of these perspectives together.  Current research focuses on the role of urban nature on mental wellbeing and extends to studies about a) the impact of spending time in nature on restoration of wellbeing,  and b) identifying which qualities of nature (in terms of content and spatial configuration) best support mental wellbeing.  Past work focused on the role of neighborhood social facilitation in the growth of environmental stewardship, and the production of an ecological framework for urban planting design that offers resilience for both personal wellbeing and urban ecosystem function under threat of unpredictable disruptions such as climate change and densification. More information available at my departmental profile and website.

Greg Keoleian : Professor and Director, Center for Sustainable Systems

Greg Keoleian

Professor and Director, Center for Sustainable Systems

Departmental Profile

Dr. Greg Keoleian is the Peter M. Wege Endowed Professor of Sustainable Systems at the University of Michigan and serves as Director of the Center for Sustainable Systems (CSS). He has appointments as Professor in the School of Natural Resources and Environment and Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.  He earned his PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan in 1987.

His research focuses on the development and application of life cycle models and sustainability metrics to guide the design and improvement of products and technology.   New methods that he has pioneered include life cycle design, life cycle optimization of product replacement, life cycle cost analysis and life cycle based sustainability assessment.  He has led over 70 life cycle projects of diverse systems including analyses of conventional and alternative vehicle technology, renewable energy technologies, buildings and infrastructure, consumer products and packaging, and a variety of food systems.  Over the past two decades he has collaborated with a wide range of businesses across diverse sectors, national labs, and government agencies at the national, state and local level.

He has collaborated with Dr. Marty Heller at CSS of the past dozen years on sustainable foods systems research.  Projects have included a life cycle based sustainability assessment of the US Food System, life cycle assessment of a large scale organic dairy, life cycle assessment of indoor recirculating shrimp farming, life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and water impacts of food systems, and food and packaging waste tradeoffs.  Current research is focused on environmental and nutritional impacts of diet choices and also trade-offs between packaging design and food waste.

Joshua Newell :

Joshua Newell

Joshua Newell is an assistant professor in the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan. He is a broadly trained human-environment geographer, whose research focuses on questions related to urban sustainability, resource consumption, and environmental and social justice. Newell’s current research can be divided into two primary areas of interest. The first, Urban Infrastructure and Form, focuses on structural features of the urban form (e.g. built environment, transport, energy, and water infrastructure). The second research area, Urban Consumption and Commodities, focuses on the interrelationships between the consumption of consumer products, our responsibilities as global 'green' urban citizens, and the role of governance mechanisms and frameworks (including local institutions) in regulating product consumption. His research approach is often multi-scalar and integrative and, in addition to theory and method found in geography and urban planning, he draws upon principles and tools of industrial ecology, and spatial analysis. In terms of sustainable food systems, Newell is conducting research on how urban agriculture might be ‘scaled-up’ and what this means for existing food, energy, and water flows, as well as food sovereignty, justice, and community viability. (Website here)

Newell teaches Sustainability and Society (ENVIRON 207), a survey course for undergraduates and includes two classes on food systems.

Joan Iverson Nassauer : Professor of Landscape Architecture

Joan Iverson Nassauer

Professor of Landscape Architecture

Departmental Profile

Joan Iverson Nassauer is Professor of Landscape Architecture in the School of Natural Resources and Environment.  Using ecological design and social science methods, she investigates how rural landscapes can embody healthy ecological processes and, simultaneously, be valued by their inhabitants.  For decades, her work has aimed to articulate the values of rural communities and promote environmental health through rural landscape change. In 1992, she began serving on the founding board of the Minnesota Institute for Sustainable Agriculture.  Working in transdisciplinary teams to develop alternative scenarios for agricultural policy and design and assess related rural landscape futures, she has helped to demonstrate how agriculture could adapt to broader social and environmental realities. Some of this work is described in detail in From the Corn Belt to the Gulf (RFF Press 2007).  Her investigations of Corn Belt farmers’ perceptions of rural landscapes have suggested how innovations to support environmental health can be designed to be valued by different types of farmers.  In several projects, she has worked with rural communities to envision multi-functional approaches to managing local landscape change. With USDA NRCS, she supported development of landscape ecological approaches to conservation.  She was named Distinguished Scholar by the International Association of Landscape Ecology (IALE) (2007) and Distinguished Practitioner of Landscape Ecology (1998).  She is the author of more than 80 refereed papers and books. http://www.joan-nassauer.com/

Ivette Perfecto : Professor of Ecology, Natural Resources and Environment

Ivette Perfecto

Professor of Ecology, Natural Resources and Environment

My research focuses on biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes in Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean. More broadly I am interested in sustainable food systems and the interactions between biodiversity and food sovereignty. My two books, Breakfast of Biodiversity (2005, with John Vandermeer), and Nature’s Matrix: Linking Agriculture, Conservation and Food Sovereignty (2009, with Angus Wright and John Vandermeer), reflects my interest in examining the interactions between natural and social systems in a dialectical way. As one of the lead coordinating authors of the United Nation’s International Assessment on Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD, 2009), I had the opportunity to work with many colleagues from academia, government and the non-profit sector in evaluating the current food system and proposing just and sustainable alternatives. With my colleague, Catherine Badgley, I teach two courses directly related to food systems, Introduction to Sustainable Food Systems (Environ 316) and Food, Land and Society (Environ 318). This last course is an intensive field course with a two-week field trip to Cuba or Chiapas, Mexico.

Thomas Princen : Associate Professor of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy

Thomas Princen

Associate Professor of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy

Departmental Profile

Thomas Princen conducts research and teaches in the field of natural resource and environmental affairs with a focus on the concept and social goal of sustainability, local to global. Research topics have ranged from the transnational relations of environmental NGOs and the distancing of commerce to overconsumption, ecological rationality, and sufficiency. He is now working on the politics of urgent transition with projects on localization, fossil fuels, and industrialism.

In his writing he aims to develop a language of sustainability and positive transition, in his teaching and speaking to promote active learning and engagement. Teaching has included courses on institutions for sustainability, the history and political economy of food, fuel and water, and the challenges of global transition.

Princen is the author of  The Logic of Sufficiency (2005),  Treading Softly: Paths to Ecological Order (2010/2013) and lead editor of Ending the Fossil Fuel Era (forthcoming) and Confronting Consumption (2002), all published by MIT Press. His current project, The Origins of Limitlessness and the Seeds of Sufficiency: The Politics of This Transition, explores transition as a long-term process of discontinuous societal change brought on by resource constraint, as “endings” in the dominance of fossil fuels, industrialism and commercialism, and as “beginnings” in organizing to live within our means.

Don Scavia : Director of Graham Sustainability Institute, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Natural Resources and Environment

Don Scavia

Director of Graham Sustainability Institute, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Natural Resources and Environment

Don Scavia is the Graham Family Professor of Sustainability and Director of the Graham Sustainability Institute. He also serves as the Special Counsel to the U-M President for Sustainability. In those capacities, he is responsible for engaging the full multidisciplinary assets of the University of Michigan to develop and implement the education, research, and operational goals of its flagship sustainability enterprise, Planet Blue, in support of sustainable communities, ecosystems, and economies from local to global scales.

He is also Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Natural Resources and Environment.  In that capacity, he and his postdocs and students combine numerical models and environmental assessments to improve the understanding of interactions between human activities on land and their impacts on coastal marine and freshwater ecosystems. The work is often used to guide and influence policies associated with agriculture’s impacts on aquatic ecosystems.  Most of their recent work has focused on agriculture and climate impacts on the iconic Gulf of Mexico, Chesapeake Bay, and Great Lakes. His research also supports development and application of Integrated Assessment, a tool that brings together natural systems science, social science, engineering, and environmental policy making.

A recent blog outlines a framing of his current thoughts toward the impacts of industrial agriculture and markets on coastal and Great Lakes ecosystems is here. Links to his research, students, postdocs, and publications can be found here

Dorceta Taylor : Professor, Environmental Justice Field of Studies Coordinator

Dorceta Taylor

Professor, Environmental Justice Field of Studies Coordinator

Joe Trumpey : Associate Professor at the Stamps School of Art and Design and the School of Natural Resources and Environment

Joe Trumpey

Associate Professor at the Stamps School of Art and Design and the School of Natural Resources and Environment

Joe Trumpey also served as Director of International Engagement for Art & Design for six years and successfully implemented the University’s first International Experience Requirement for all Art & Design students. He is a faculty associate with the University of Michigan’s African Study Center, Program in the Environment, and the Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum. He currently serves on the Executive Committee for the Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute.

Trumpey earned his A.B in Art and Biology from Wabash College and his M.F.A. in Medical and Biological Illustration from the University of Michigan. Before joining Michigan's faculty in 1994, he was chief medical illustrator and director of graphic arts for the College of Veterinary Medicine at North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

While at U-M, Trumpey created a BFA Science Illustration Concentration / Curriculum that was successfully offered from 1995 to 2006. He also founded and currently directs Michigan Science Art, one of the largest groups of science illustrators working together in North America. Their most notable achievement is the completion of approximately 5,000 illustrations for the award-winning, 17-volume Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia. As a freelance design consultant and illustrator, Trumpey has worked with numerous zoos, museums and publishers across the country including: the Toledo Zoo, the Detroit Zoo, the Smithsonian / National Zoo, the North Carolina Zoo, Houghton Mifflin Publishing, Wolfe Publishing, Lippincot Publishing, Gale / Thompson Publishing, Mosby Publishing, ScienceWorks, Inc., Appleton and Lang Publishing, Glaxo-Welcome Pharmaceuticals, Not A Book Inc., and Stackpole Publishing. Trumpey's teaching focuses on aspects of sustainability and culture, experiential observation, and using creative processes to connect the natural world and society. The cornerstone of his work as an educator is an annual field course, called EcoExplorers, in which students prepare and conduct four weeks of fieldwork at various locations around the world, such as Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Everglades National Park, the Four Corners region, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, and Madagascar. He is a recipient of the University of Michigan’s Undergraduate Teaching Award and has been a TedX speaker.With its emphasis on design, biodiversity, agriculture and ecological sustainability, Trumpey's creative work has been exhibited in a wide variety of venues across the United States and abroad. The depth of his devotion to these issues is evident in the fact that he, his wife and two daughters live and work on a small farm dedicated to their own food production and the preservation of genetic diversity in rare livestock. He designed and built their solar powered, off-grid strawbale home. Website here.

Vivian Valencia : Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Vivian Valencia

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Vivian is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Agroecology and Food System Sustainability at the University of Michigan. Her current work investigates relationships between policy, agricultural practices, and socioecological resilience of food systems for the family farming sector in Brazil. In her prior research, Vivian integrated methods and theories from the natural and social sciences to investigate how small-scale farmers manage forests to produce shade coffee and the consequences for biodiversity conservation. Vivian is also interested in how to bridge the gap between academia and policymaking. She explored this issue as a visiting scholar at the German Federal Foreign Office in Berlin and continues to do so via her involvement in the Global Diplomacy Lab.

Vivian earned a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Columbia University, a master’s degree in Environmental Health from Johns Hopkins University, as well as a BS in Biology and a BA in French from University of Florida.

John Vandermeer : Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

John Vandermeer

Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

John Vandermeer has been involved in research and teaching in food and agriculture related topics for the past 40 years.  His research has concentrated on the ecology of the coffee agroecosystem in Mexico, elaborating the complex ecological structures involved in complicated dynamics of the pest control system there.  He has authored 15 books, mainly concerned with agroecosystems and more than 200 publications in theoretical ecology, tropical ecology and agroecology.  He is a founding member of the New World Agriculture and Ecology Group.  Currently he teaches an elementary course (Bio/Environ 101 – Food, energy and the environment) and two advanced courses (EEB 477 -- Field Ecology and EEB 498 – Ecology of agroecosystems). Website

Medical School


Alicia Cohen : M.D., Department of Family Medicine

Alicia Cohen

M.D., Department of Family Medicine

Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning


Andrew Herscher : Associate Professor of Architecture

Andrew Herscher

Associate Professor of Architecture

Trained as an architect and historian of architecture, Andrew Herscher writes on the spatial politics of violence, humanitarian and human rights issues, exile and migration, and public and counter-public memory. His research and writing is informed by his long-term participant-observation in Kosovo’s post-conflict environment, including work with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, the United Nations Mission in Kosovo, and the Kosovo Cultural Heritage Project, a nongovernmental organization he co-founded and co-directed. He has also been involved in collaborative research both in and out of the academy; he co-organized the Detroit Unreal Estate Agency, an open-access platform for the study of urban crisis using Detroit as a focal point, and he is currently a member of the We the People of Detroit Community Research Collective. Among his publications are Violence Taking Place: The Architecture of the Kosovo Conflict, published by Stanford University Press in 2010, The Unreal Estate Guide to Detroit, published by the University of Michigan Press in 2012, and the forthcoming Spatial Violence, co-edited with Anooradha Iyer Siddiqi.

 

Lesli Hoey : Assistant Professor of Urban and Regional Planning

Lesli Hoey

Assistant Professor of Urban and Regional Planning

Lesli Hoey teaches graduate courses in food systems planning, urban planning in developing countries, program evaluation, and qualitative research methods. Hoey's research focuses on the ways planning mechanisms limit and build equitable, healthy and sustainable food systems. She is particularly interested in the intersection of program design and food policy advocacy, implementation, and evaluation.

Her past work, focused primarily on Bolivia and comparative research, has examined strategies for mainstreaming nutrition into national policy agendas, the challenges of multisectoral food policy, factors constraining nutrition interventions in rapidly urbanizing contexts, approaches for integrating evidence-based and experiential knowledge in food and nutrition evaluation, and "adaptive" forms of food policy implementation (i.e. iterative, collaborative, negotiated). Her current projects examine the links between food policy, urban agriculture and civic engagement in Southeast Michigan and the long-term food system impacts of innovative land redistribution planning in Bolivia.

Prior to pursuing a Ph.D., Hoey worked as a program evaluator and action researcher, focusing on equity-oriented K-12 and higher education programs in the US as well as rural development, malnutrition and food security projects in the Mississippi Delta, Peru, Albania and Bolivia. She earned a PhD and master's degree in City and Regional Planning from Cornell University and a B.A. in psychology from Earlham College. Website here

Steven Mankouche : Associate Professor of Architecture

Steven Mankouche

Associate Professor of Architecture

Steven Mankouche is a registered architect, principal at ARCHOLAB and an Associate Professor of Architecture at Taubman College. Steven was born in Athens, Greece and grew up in Milan, Italy. He received his architectural training at Cornell University (B. Arch + M. Arch) and the Architectural Association in London (RIBA Part One). Mankouche has lectured and taught architecture at institutions in the US and abroad, including the State University of New York at Buffalo and the Fachhochschule Liechtenstein. He is the recipient of numerous awards including: Architect Magazine’s 2010, 2013, and 2014 R+D Awards and 2013 P/A (Progressive Architecture Award), three Boston Society of Architects (BSA) Un-Built Architecture awards and 2003 Young Architects Award from the New York Architectural League.

Mankouche is a co-founder of ARCHOLAB, (Architectural Research Collaborative) with Joshua Bard and artist Abigail Murray. This cross-institutional collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University brings architects together with other disciplines such as art, robotics, activism, filmmaking, advocacy and farming.  ARCHOLAB's work focuses on two primary disciplinary concerns: the ability for people to construct their own environment and understanding relation between history, technology, materials and labor. ARCHOLAB is interested in developing design strategies and methods for empowering public participation in the design of their built environment.  ARCHOLAB uses digital technology to revisit and revive lost historic construction methods and sustainable practices. One driver behind ARCHOLAB's work is the understanding that pre-electrification technologies while being craft intensive are also most often centered around natural, low carbon footprint materials which are less predictable than highly industrialized materials. ARCHOLAB is interested in why certain material and methods are no longer in use and what drove them into extinction. Historic construction methods according to ARCHOLAB have deep seeded cultural roots which when investigated using digital fabrication tools such as multi axial robotic arms shed meaningful insight on the relation between haptic knowledge and craft as well as the economics of modern industrial manufacturing and the politics of labor. ARCHOLAB’s most recent project lead by Abigail Murray and Steven Mankouche, called AFTERHOUSE, transforms homes irreparably damaged by disuse and fire into semi subterranean greenhouses that use just the warmth of the earth and light of the sun to grow crops like pomegranates and olives without the use of additional energy.

Richard Norton : Associate Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, Program in the Environment and College of Literature, Science and the Arts

Richard Norton

Associate Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, Program in the Environment and College of Literature, Science and the Arts

Richard K. Norton serves as chair of the urban and regional planning program, as well as faculty coordinator for the land use and environmental planning concentration for the master of urban planning degree. He also holds a joint appointment as associate professor with the University of Michigan's Program in the Environment, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. He earned his Ph.D. in city and regional planning and his J.D. with honors at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also holds master degrees in public policy studies and environmental management from Duke University.

Dr. Norton teaches and conducts research in the areas of sustainable development, land use and environmental planning, and planning law. He is interested in local governance for land use and development management, particularly as it relates to the theory and practice of urban and regional planning for sustainable development. He contributes actively to the Michigan Association of Planning (MAP) by serving on its planning law committee. Through those efforts he has taken the lead in preparing draft legislation for the Michigan Legislature to reform the state's planning and zoning enabling laws, including reforms adopted by the Legislature in 2006 and 2008. He has also written amicus curiae appellate briefs to the Michigan Court of Appeals and the Michigan Supreme Court on behalf of the American Planning Association and MAP regarding planning and zoning disputes in the state. Prior to completing his graduate studies, Dr. Norton worked in professional practice as a consulting environmental policy analyst and planner in Washington, D.C., and San Francisco, California. Department website here

Law School


Alicia Alvarez : Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Community and Economic Development Clinic

Alicia Alvarez

Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Community and Economic Development Clinic

Alicia Alvarez provides and directs legal services to nonprofit and community-based organizations and social enterprises in Detroit and surrounding area through the Community and Economic Development Clinic.  Prof. Alvarez is interested in issues of economic justice. She represents several groups working on food justice and urban agriculture. Prior to coming to Michigan in 2006, Prof. Alvarez taught at DePaul University College of Law where she represented groups involved in food urban agriculture and food security. Prof. Alvarez is the coauthor (with Paul R. Tremblay) of Introduction to Transactional Lawyering Practice (West, 2013).

aalvar@umich.edu

Staff


Alex Bryan : Sustainable Food Program Manager

Alex Bryan

Sustainable Food Program Manager

Alex Bryan re-joined his alma mater in fall 2016 as the UM Sustainable Food Program Manager. UMSFP is a student-led umbrella organization designed to bring together student efforts to build a sustainable food system on campus as students grow as food citizens and change agents. His role is to connect students with the resources they need to succeed in working with faculty, staff, one another, and the larger community in meeting their individual and collective goals related to sustainable food. Uniquely nested within MDining, the UMSFP Program Manager is able to build relationships with University operations to facilitate systemic University-wide change.

Alex was previously the Director of Agricultural Programs at the Greater Lansing Food Bank where he managed two programs, Garden Project and Lansing Roots. Garden Project, a community garden support program, helped over 8,000 individuals access fresh food, annually, through community gardening at over 130 garden locations representing 30+ acres. Lansing Roots, a land-based farm business incubator, primarily focused on helping under-served populations scale up production to viable small-scale farm operations in mid-Michigan by providing land/infrastructure, technical support, and marketing outlets to predominantly immigrant and refugee families. Both programs used a community based asset development model to offer a "hands-up" approach to stabilizing community food.
Alex is the founding board president of National Young Farmers Coalition, serves on the board of Michigan Food and Farming Systems, and helped found the food policy council of mid-Michigan. An AmeriCorps Alums National Leadership Award Winner, Alex is co-owner of Food Field, a 4 acre farm in the city of Detroit, and was recognized by Farm Credit Services as a Farm Credit 100 Fresh Perspectives Honoree for FCS 100th anniversary for his work to bridge rural and urban agriculture. He has given talks at national and international conferences on urban farming and hunger issues and is a strong supporter of community sourced initiatives to solving food issues.

frogo@umich.edu
Emily Canosa : Assistant Director, UM Sustainable Living Experience

Emily Canosa

Assistant Director, UM Sustainable Living Experience

In 2014 Emily Canosa came on board as the first manager of UMSFP, a student-led umbrella organization designed to bring together student efforts to build a sustainable food system on campus as students grow as food citizens and change agents. Her role is to connect students with the resources they need to succeed in working with faculty, staff, one another, and the larger community in meeting their individual and collective goals related to sustainable food.

Emily began working with food at a permaculture farm in Japan, and later worked with community gardens and youth programming alongside residents of Avalon Housing in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Her Masters degree led her back to Japan to study sustainable food movements in the Kanto region, and after completion she became a farmer-owner at Singing Tree Garden, a worker cooperative farm in Detroit that uses sustainable growing practices. In addition to working with UMSFP, she is co-founder of The Hive sustainable living cooperative, and board member of The Agrarian Adventure, a local nonprofit that aims to enrich K-12 student connections between food, the environment, communities and personal health.

Barbara Hagan : Sustainability Representative

Barbara Hagan

Sustainability Representative

Barbara is a member of the Office of Campus Sustainability (OCS).  OCS is organized within Facilities and Operations and has responsibility for reporting the progress made each year on U-M's Sustainability goals.  Barbara supports efforts to increase U-M sustainable food purchasing and is responsible for reporting on  U-M's Sustainable food goal .  With a passion for sustainable food and educating the U-M community, Barb has been involved in MFarmers markets, Env 391 student projects, Michigan Harvest events and works with Procurement to develop relationships with vendors that can provide sustainable food to campus.

haganb@umich.edu
Juli McLoone : Outreach Librarian and Curator, Special Collections Library

Juli McLoone

Outreach Librarian and Curator, Special Collections Library

Juli McLoone is an Outreach Librarian & Curator in the University of Michigan Special Collections Library, where she curates post-1700 print materials, including the Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive (JBLCA). Containing more than 15,000 items, the JBLCA documents American foodways over more than 200 years through cookbooks, menus, and advertising ephemera. Through the culinary archive one can explore changing attitudes towards diet and health, homemaking, commercial dining and the industrialization of food production. It also reveals perspectives surrounding race, class, and gender. If you would like to explore how a historical approach might fit into your sustainability research or teaching, please contact Juli at jmcloone@umich.edu.

Juli received her MA in Library and Information Science, with a Graduate Certificate in Book Studies / Book Arts and Technologies from the University of Iowa in 2009 and an MA in Cultural Anthropology, also from the University of Iowa, in 2007. Before graduate school, she spent a year as part of the Capuchin Franciscan Volunteer Corps, working with Earthworks Urban Farm and the Growing Healthy Kids Program in Detroit.

Jeremy Moghtader : Campus Farm Manager

Jeremy Moghtader

Campus Farm Manager

Jeremy Moghtader is formerly the Director of Programs for the Michigan State University Student Organic Farm, where he also served for 10 years as Farm Manager overseeing the farms 15 acres of production, year-round CSA program, as well as teaching and research partnerships.   In his time at MSU he developed and directed the MSU Organic Farmer Training Program and the Farmer Field School creating courses, teaching, and giving talks on organic and ecologically based farming techniques as well as new farm business development and student farms.  Jeremy holds a M.S. in Resource Ecology and Management from the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment, where his research focused on Agro-ecology, and a B.S. in Economics also from the University of Michigan.

Jeremy is a two time nominee for Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service (MOSES) Organic Farmer of the Year and co-author of the widely cited “Organic Agriculture and the Global Food Supply” published in Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. He served on the national Sustainable Agriculture Education Association (SAEA) founding steering team and was a founding board member of two local food systems non-profits the Agrarian Adventure and the Food System Economic Partnership. Jeremy was also a founding member of the Ann Arbor Farm to School Collaboration and the Tilian Farm Development Center.  Whenever he has a chance he loves backpacking on Lake Michigan with his spouse Elissa Trumbull, Director of Double Up Food Bucks Program for the Fair Food Network, and their two wonderful daughters. His favorite vegetable is a freshly harvested Hakuri Salad Turnip.

koushyar@umich.edu
Adrienne O’Brien : Collections and Natural Areas Specialist with the Field Services department at UM Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum

Adrienne O’Brien

Collections and Natural Areas Specialist with the Field Services department at UM Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum

Adrienne was raised on a dairy farm and worked with her parents in the family vegetable garden. After graduation with a BS at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, she worked for a short time in the college greenhouses, before moving to Ann Arbor and later started working at UM MBGNA in 1982. She currently works at the Arboretum, maintaining the peony collection and the gardens around the visitor center at the Washington Heights entrance, and, at the Botanical Gardens, maintaining several garden and natural areas, growing plants for sale, including native plants, herbs and vegetables and ornamental hanging baskets and containers. She advises students working with the Campus Farm and Cultivating Community as they plan, order seeds and start plants in the greenhouse for the garden and for the Kitchen Favorites sale, which is a fundraiser supporting interns working at the garden at the Ginsberg Center and the Campus Farm.

Lilly Fink Shapiro : Program Manager, Sustainable Food Systems Initiative

Lilly Fink Shapiro

Program Manager, Sustainable Food Systems Initiative

Lilly's passion for equitable and sustainable food systems crosses disciplines and sectors. She has worked since 2013 to expand and strengthen the University of Michigan Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, which has gained national recognition and spurred local collaboration. Lilly works closely with multi-disciplinary faculty across campus, engages in food systems research, and has taught locally and abroad. Her experience includes working with Fair Food Network on the "Double Up Food Bucks" program, evaluating the Michigan Good Food Charter project, and joining local activists to advocate for a variety of food systems issues. Lilly has conducted fieldwork in Eastern Bolivia and has led experiential education trips in Peru, Tanzania, Costa Rica, and Cuba. Lilly earned her Masters of Public Health in Health Behavior and Health Education from the University of Michigan in 2015, and graduated from Wesleyan University in 2009 with High Honors in Anthropology. She speaks Spanish and French and cultivates a front yard farm.

finkshap@umich.edu
Maren Spolum : Research Manager, Food Access in Michigan Project

Maren Spolum

Research Manager, Food Access in Michigan Project

Emily Springfield : Academic Projects Manager

Emily Springfield

Academic Projects Manager

Emily Springfield, MS Ed, is a curriculum design specialist  with a particular enthusiasm for sustainable food systems.  She’s taught dozens of workshops on year-round local eating, covering topics from garden planning to canning to cheesemaking  to “what do I do with all this kale?” She’s the founder of the School of Dentistry “Help Yourself” Garden and has deep experience with organic gardening in Michigan.
If you have a sustainability topic you’d like to teach, but aren’t sure how to go about it, Emily can help you determine the best teaching methods and learning technologies to achieve your instructional goals.

espring@umich.edu
Keith Soster : Director of Student Engagement for Michigan Dining

Keith Soster

Director of Student Engagement for Michigan Dining

A local and sustainable food resource expert, Keith works to unlock Michigan Dining’s transformative potential as the most extensive food program on campus. He also acts as point-person and sustainability lead for Student Life as a whole, overseeing sustainability progress in buildings amounting to nearly one-fifth of the university’s Ann Arbor campus. At the core of Keith’s work is outreach, putting him in constant contact with suppliers, students and campus stakeholders, and involving him in myriad initiatives for a greener, healthier campus. Currently he is advisor to the University of Michigan Sustainable Food Program (UMSFP) and the Michigan Dinings’ student Food Advisory Committee.
Keith is a regular sponsor of student projects, frequently partnering with initiatives from the ENVIRON 391 class. Past projects include Sustainable Food Labeling, Reducing or Eliminating Bottled Water Use on Campus, and the Building University Unions Education for Sustainability Program. Keith also puts his expertise in procurement and event staging in the service of student-led programs, teaming up with students on the Go Blue Box pilot program, helping to bring fresh produce to the Unions as part of “Farm Fresh Wednesdays” at U-Go’s, and collaborating with Central Student Government to hold the M Farmers’ Market. Keith is also a sought-after speaker on sustainable food topics, speaking on food trends at the Big Ten Union’s Director Conference and the Association of College Unions International, as well as teaching sessions for the National Association of College & University Food Services.