“Monday Breakfast”

“Monday Breakfast” (Among Us Mortals, 03/02/1949)
by W.E. (William Ely) Hill (1887-1962)
18.5 x 15 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

W.E. (William Ely) Hill (1887-1962) was known for his masterful black and white Sunday page, “Among Us Mortals,” sometimes referred to as the Hill Page. Please see the Gallery description for more about Hill.

From this March 2, 1949 edition, titled “Monday Breakfast,” some quotes:

“These two lovelies room together and are breakfasting in the bathroom. They both have office jobs and are very introspective on Monday mornings. Each is thinking, “Oh, dear! Another week ahead at that office.” ”

“After breakfast. With husband out of the way and the children off to school the little wife takes time out to tune in her favorite soap opera. The Saturday episode was thrilling and she doesn’t want to miss anything.“

“Looking Glass”


“Looking Glass” (1880s)
by Samuel D Ehrhart (1862-1937)
8 x 4 in, ink on heavy board
Coppola Collection

American cartoonist and illustrator born in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, Ehrhart received his education in the New York City school system. Subsequently, he studied art in Munich. His work appeared in Harper’s Monthly (1878-79), Puck (1880, and 1888-1913), and Judge (1887). In 1920 and 1930 he reported his profession as artist and his birthplace as Pennsylvania to the Brooklyn, New York census-taker. He died in Brooklyn, New York on October 26, 1937.

“Know them By Their Hats”

“Know them By Their Hats” (Among Us Mortals, 09/17/1944)
by W.E. (William Ely) Hill (1887-1962)
18.5 x 15 in., ink on board

W.E. (William Ely) Hill (1887-1962) was known for his masterful black and white Sunday page, “Among Us Mortals,” sometimes referred to as the Hill Page. Please see the Gallery description for more about Hill.

From this September 17, 1944 edition, titled “The Liquor Drought,” some quotes:

“The Cutie. This headgear is a favorite with the girl who is almost too cute to let live. The kind who says, “Don’t I say the CRAZIEST things!”

“The rakish angle. Watch out girls, this means “Wolf!” “

“Under Paid is Right”


“Under Paid is Right” (December 16, 1941)
by Will B Johnstone (1881-1944)
11 x 22 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Johnstone studied at the Chicago Art Institute, after which he became an artist with the Chicago Interocean. He illustrated the daily news events, and Johnstone was the first person to diagram football games showing every play for each team. He eventually moved to New York City, where he began doing illustrations for William Randolph Hearst’s newspapers. Later on, he moved to The World, which was later renamed to The New York World-Telegram. He did a comic strip based on the news of the day. This feature had a recurring character that depicted a victimized tax payer. The man in question had been literally stripped down in the nude after paying his taxes and therefore walked around wearing nothing but a barrel. This has become a stock image in many humoristic cartoons and comics.

Johnstone and his brother were playwrights, and co-wrote ten musicals that were produced on Broadway. For his play, “I’ll Say She is,” he recruited Groucho Marx and then rewrote the play to bring in all the Marx brothers. Johnstone was a co-writer on “Monkey Business,” “Horse Feathers,” and “a Day at the Races.”

Before the direct involvement of US troops in WW2, privates in the US Army earned $21 a month. US soldiers were stationed in the Philippines in late 1940, in anticipation of US involvement in the war.  The day after Pearl Harbor, the Japanese made their first landings on Philippine soil, and the action in the Pacific Theater was underway. The first weeks were active, but the US soldiers were using old munitions and the supply lines began to be cut off.

Things moved fast. The main attack took place December 22, 1941, and by March, the Japanese had taken the main island and occupied Manila.

“An Idealist in a Realistic World”

“An Idealist in a Realistic World” (March 30, 1942)
by Will B Johnstone (1881-1944)
14 x 22 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Johnstone studied at the Chicago Art Institute, after which he became an artist with the Chicago Interocean. He illustrated the daily news events, and Johnstone was the first person to diagram football games showing every play for each team. He eventually moved to New York City, where he began doing illustrations for William Randolph Hearst’s newspapers. Later on, he moved to The World, which was later renamed to The New York World-Telegram. He did a comic strip based on the news of the day. This feature had a recurring character that depicted a victimized tax payer. The man in question had been literally stripped down in the nude after paying his taxes and therefore walked around wearing nothing but a barrel. This has become a stock image in many humoristic cartoons and comics.

Johnstone and his brother were playwrights, and co-wrote ten musicals that were produced on Broadway. For his play, “I’ll Say She is,” he recruited Groucho Marx and then rewrote the play to bring in all the Marx brothers. Johnstone was a co-writer on “Monkey Business,” “Horse Feathers,” and “a Day at the Races.”

This piece is also representative of Johnstone’s terrific panorama pieces.

A capsule view of WW2 appears across the hemisphere, along with the naïve engagement of the United States.

Highlights on the map:

The ghost ship SS Bremen, a steamer that used to move between NYC to Bremerhaven, was gutted by disgruntled crew members on March 16, 1942.

Danzig, annexed by Nazi Germany on September 2, 1939, during the invasion of Poland at the start of WW2.

The Italians breaking the treaty with Ethiopia, 1935-37.

The Austrian Anschluss, March 1938.

The Slovak Republic became a client state of Germany in March, 1939.

The fight with Russia was deeply engaged in late 1941 and early 1942.

You can see the liberal, commie sympathizers (the Parlor Pinks) abandoning ship.

In March 1942, the Pacific War was still dominated by the Japanese forces, and the fear of invasion and the ban on large public assembly was strongly in effect on the US west coast.

In fact, that year, on January 1, is the only time the Rose Bowl game was played anywhere other than in Pasadena.

“One Rings While the Other Tolls”


“One Rings While the Other Tolls” (July 4, 1944)
by Daniel Sanborn Bishop (1900-1959)
15 x 17 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Bishop studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. After graduating, Bishop joined the Oregon Journal as its editorial cartoonist in 1920 and then moved to the St. Louis Star Times in 1925. He played the trumpet in his spare time and was a member of the Portland Symphony Orchestra.

Following the D-Day invasion of June 1944, the Allies broke out of Normandy and advanced rapidly across France and Belgium. Hitler aimed to halt them by a surprise Blitzkrieg. Several armored divisions massed in the Ardennes with the goal of breaking through Allied lines. American forces held on stubbornly in spite of heavy casualties— more than 19,000 died. The Germans had limited supplies and could only fight for few days to before fuel and ammunition ran out, so the offensive soon ran out of steam. Allied lines “bulged” but did not break, and hundreds of thousands of reinforcements poured into the area. Afterwards, Germany lacked resources for another offensive and the end was inevitable.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 8


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 8
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 12


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 12
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 15


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 15
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.

“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 16


“Spark Man” in Sparkler Comics #23 (Jul 1943) p 16
by Fred Methot and Reg Greenwood (1899-1943)
13.5 x 19.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Omar Kavak, a classical violinist, discovered a way to absorb an electrical charge without harm and decided to use this power to fight crime. Inventing a pair of gloves which would allow him to discharge lightning through his hands, he became Sparkman. Eventually, after several superhero adventures, he enlisted in the army and became a non-costumed, super-powered soldier who fought the Japanese.

He appeared in Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #1-30 (Jul 1940 – Feb 1944) , 40 (Jan 1945), and in Spark Man #1 (1945). His real name was a mystery until Sparkler Comics vol. 2 #10.

Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with Spark Man, in Sparkler, as well as The Mirror Man and The Triple Terror, both introduced in Tip Top Comics (Oct 1940).  Methot and Greenwood (1899-1943) are credited with The Mirror Man stories through Tip Top Comics 87 (August 1943), which was presumably Greenwood’s last story because he is listed as dying in 1943). The more noted Paul Berdanier (1879-1961) took over The Triple Terror and did one Mirror Man story (TTC 88, September 1943).

Greenwood is credited with the Spark Man stories through Sparkler #25 (Sept 1943), with Berdanier taking over in issue #26, after Greenwood’s death.