“Mango on a Wood Block” (2018)


“Mango on a Wood Block” (2018)
by Abbey Ryan (1979-)
10 x 8 in., oil on linen on panel
Coppola Collection

From the artist:

The mango in this painting is created with painterly spots of all the colors in the spectrum, working in unison to create a luminous form. It is meant to embody all that comes with revealing oneself entirely and with inspiration — full of color.

“Two Pears on Blue Block from Patmos, Greece (Yin & Yang)” (2018)


“Two Pears on Blue Block from Patmos, Greece (Yin & Yang)” (2018)
by Abbey Ryan (1979-)
9 x 12 in., oil on linen on panel
Coppola Collection

From the artist:

This is from my Yin and Yang series – visual representations of “inseparable, interconnected, complements.” The pears are sitting on this amazing wood block, an artifact I found on Patmos during my month in Greece in June 2017. I carried it back home with me from Greece.

 

“Still Life with Marigold and Golden Pear” (2018)


“Still Life with Marigold and Golden Pear” (2018)
by Abbey Ryan (1979-)
5 x 4 in., oil on linen on panel
Coppola Collection

From the artist:

Marigolds are one of the most easily recognizable symbols of Dia de los Muertos.

Dia de los Muertos is a Mexican holiday celebrated from October 31 to November 2. While many Americans believe that this holiday is similar to our Halloween, it’s completely different. The festivities were created for people to gather and remember friends and family who have died. Though this sounds like a day of grieving, it’s actually meant to be a day to celebrate the lives of the loved ones who have passed. This holiday is deeply rooted in tradition, with plenty of symbols adorning the ofrendas, also known as altars, that people put together for their deceased loved ones. Flowers in particular play a very large role in the celebration of Dia de los Muertos.

“Still Life with Jug, Cicada, Grapes, and Hazelnuts” (2018)

“Still Life with Jug, Cicada, Grapes, and Hazelnuts” (the light/the shade) 2018
by Abbey Ryan (1979-)
11 x 14 in., oil on linen on panel
Coppola Collection

From the artist:

One of the most prominently featured insects in Byzantine, Gothic and Renaissance painting was the cicada — as a symbol of prayer, sanctuary and hope. Also, the hazelnut was seen, by the Greeks and Romans, as a symbol of peace and health.

“Still Life with Golden Pears and Pussy Willow” (2018)


“Still Life with Golden Pears and Pussy Willow” (2018)
by Abbey Ryan (1979-)
6 x 5 in., oil on linen on panel
Coppola Collection

From the artist:

Pussy willows always remind me of my grandmother. This passage from a reference source on symbolism is to the point:

Although many willows are associated with sadness, the pussy willow flower is thought to symbolize good will and motherhood. They are also thought to represent protection for the home, and are frequently given as gifts to new homeowners. Although these blossoms can be given fresh, they are best presented dry, where their unique beauty can be kept in the home indefinitely.

“Apple with Honeycomb on Silver Plate”

“Apple with Honeycomb on Silver Plate” (2018)
by Abbey Ryan (1979-)
4 x 6 in, Oil on Linen on Panel
Coppola Collection

I found great humor in this painting. At first glance, you might imagine wanting to be a slice of apple pie on a plate next to an apple, which is a reasonable expectation. Then, there is something right about the overall outline, and something quite wrong about the details.