“Know them By Their Hats”

“Know them By Their Hats” (Among Us Mortals, 09/17/1944)
by W.E. (William Ely) Hill (1887-1962)
18.5 x 15 in., ink on board

W.E. (William Ely) Hill (1887-1962) was known for his masterful black and white Sunday page, “Among Us Mortals,” sometimes referred to as the Hill Page. Please see the Gallery description for more about Hill.

From this September 17, 1944 edition, titled “The Liquor Drought,” some quotes:

“The Cutie. This headgear is a favorite with the girl who is almost too cute to let live. The kind who says, “Don’t I say the CRAZIEST things!”

“The rakish angle. Watch out girls, this means “Wolf!” “

“Dressing in the Woods”

“Dressing in the Woods” (ca. 1950?)
by Robert Patterson (1898-1981)
13 x 17 in, acrylic on board
Coppola Collection

Patterson was a prolific illustrator in both advertising and fashion. His work appeared broadly, and included magazines such as Vogue, McCall’s, Judge, Snappy Stories, Ladies’ Home Journal, Redbook, Woman’s Home Companion, American, Cosmopolitan, and American Weekly.

Unfortunately, I have not been able to track down anything at all about this piece. The other Patterson stuff I have is all from the 1950s.

“Leave Me Alone”

“Leave Me Alone” (ca. 1950?)
by Robert Patterson (1898-1981)
8 x 11 in, acrylic on board
Coppola Collection

Patterson was a prolific illustrator in both advertising and fashion. His work appeared broadly, and included magazines such as Vogue, McCall’s, Judge, Snappy Stories, Ladies’ Home Journal, Redbook, Woman’s Home Companion, American, Cosmopolitan, and American Weekly.

Unfortunately, I have not been able to track down anything at all about this piece. The other Patterson stuff I have is all from the 1950s.

Don’t miss the crazy rooster-lamp.

Don’t miss how the fact that the pants are behind the lamps means that the figure of the woman must be a giant.

“Les maris ne sont toujours pas rire.”


“Les maris ne sont toujours pas rire.” (ca. 1843)
Paul Gavarni (1804-1866)
6 x 9 in., ink and watercolor wash on paper
Coppola Collection

A two- volume anthology entitled “Le Diable à Paris” was published sequentially in 1845-46. It was the first literary and artistic anthology published in the 1840s to include a chapter explaining to non-specialists what statistical data could reveal about Parisian social conditions. The chapter was not at all superficial; it contained seventeen pages of tables and explanatory notes that care- fully described what the new statistics showed about the standards of living of both rich and poor in Paris.

“Le Diable à Paris” is important to art historians because it included a series of illustrations by Guillaume Sulpice Chevallier, known as Gavarni, the popular Parisian illustrator who was one of the city’s most colorful personalities. His entire series of illustrations showing types of Parisians, particularly the poorest ones, was popular enough to be later assembled as Les gens de Paris in a separate book. Each illustration was captioned by Gavarni himself, who took pride in writing a touching or witty description for each image.  Gavarni’s illustrations included some of the cruelest scenes of waifs, paupers, beggars, and les miserables that had yet been done.

“Les maris ne sont toujours pas rire.”

The husbands are still not laughing, under the sign that reads Rendezvous Des Amis.

This is signed by Gavarni in his style, buried in some of the shading at the lower right. The book used engravings that were based on drawings, so this is the basis (or at least a draft) for the illustration that appeared. Its notation on the green paper matches the illustration.

Le Diable à Paris (Volume I)
In “Drames Bourgeois”

Written with the published caption “Les maris ne sont toujours pas rire.”

Looking at the engraving, with the concerned woman nearby, it seems perhaps that the husband is not too amused with the rendezvous that has happened.

“Lonesomehurst”


“Lonesomehurst” (“Puck’s Library,” Cover, August 1894)
by Charles Jay “CJ” Taylor (1855-1929)
14 x 16 inches, ink on board
Coppola Collection

Taylor originally studied law at Columbia University, then moved to art at the Art Students League, the National Academy of Design (with Eastman Johnson) and City College of New York, as well as in London and Paris. Taylor painted hundreds of landscape pictures in oil, which he sold to dealers and at auction. He started contributing illustrations to the New York’s Daily Graphic in 1873, and also to magazines such as Harpers, Puck and Punch.

His book ‘Taylor Girls’ gained him international acclaim. He returned to painting in the later part of his life, and spent 18 years as the head of the Painting and Decoration Department in the College of Fine Arts at the Carnegie Institute of Technology (the Carnegie Alma Mater song is his composition).

Started as a German language publication, the first issue of “Puck” in English appeared in March 1877: 16 pages for 10 cents. Readers liked the cartoon satires, which were rare in American periodicals at that time. The magazine was named for William Shakespeare’s character, Puck, in Midsummer Night’s Dream: “What fools these mortals be!”

Its popularity and circulation soared, reaching nearly 90,000 subscribers in the 1890s. Spin-off publications were created, such as “Puck’s Library” and “Pickings from Puck.” The Hearst conglomerate purchased “Puck” in 1917 and replaced the hard-hitting political commentary with a focus on the fine arts and social fads. Declining subscriptions resulted in Hearst’s decision to discontinue “Puck” in September 1918.

Now, about this “Lonesomehurst” word.

There is a large number of streets in the UK whose names end in -hurst, for example, Ravenhurst,Gathurst, Oakhurst, Amhurst, Bonehurst, Eaglehurst… It’s a Saxon word meaning, roughly, a identifiable hill with a wooded or bushy eminence. A sense of place that is isolated and associated with something.

In the 1890s, “lonesomehurst” was used to refer to the new phenomenon of single-family homes sitting at the outskirts of cities. In other words: the suburbs. In a 1901 book by Joseph Fitzgerald (“Word and Phrase”), he describes an origin of the word (although it’s clearly something that was in use, given the August 1894 cover date on the issue that carries this cartoon, so this counts as apocryphal).

“The unusual violence of the wind and snowstorms of February, 1895, caused great suffering and loss of life among mariners and landfolk on the Atlantic coast, and throughout the country; and the newspaper chroniclers presented, some of them, marvelously realistic pictures of the scenes of devastation. One of these scribes, in telling of a burial at sea, coined, or at least employed a singularly apt and telling phrase: **They dropped the dead babies into the yawn of the sea.” Very happy, too, was the name, apparently coined for that occasion, to express the forlorn situation of outlying new suburbs, when cut off by such a visitation from their mother city and place of occupation, — Lonesomehurst.”

Thanks to the Internet of All Things, you can find out that the first single-family house built in Garden City, NJ (in the mid-1890s, at the corner of Cathedral and, which is still there) was called Lonesomehurst.

This all gives the 1894 cover its meaning, as this guy is doing the chores of his suburban home ownership, with the widely separated neighbors showing in the distance. Eighty years later, people would still be singing about life in the suburbs:

The local rock group down the street
Is trying hard to learn their song
They serenade the weekend squire
Who just came out to mow his lawn

Another pleasant valley Sunday
Charcoal burning everywhere
Another pleasant valley Sunday
Here is Status Symbol Land

Songwriters: Carol King/Gerry Goffin
Singers: The Monkees

“Where Was You Going So Hasty?”

“Where Was You Going So Hasty?” is the first question for me
by Rollin Kirby (1975-1952)
From, Chapter 13 “Letters of a Japanese Schoolboy: Hashimura Togo” (Wallace Irwin),
In, Collier’s Vol 41 (24), 1908, p 18 (September 5, 1908)
13.5 x 18.5 in., ink on board
Coppola Collection

Kirby studied painting in New York City and Paris as a young man but switched to magazine illustrating and then cartooning. Kirby made his reputation during the 18 years (1913 to 1931) he spent on the New York World, where he the first Pulitzer Prize for cartooning, and then twice more (1922, 1925, 1929).

This drawing, and one other from the story that is part of a CAF collection, are as early as I have ever seen a Kirby piece, who ended up much better known for his editorial work.

Serialized in Collier’s, then published in 1909 by Doubleday, the story is an early anti-Japanese work, written about a Japanese youth who studied and lived in California around the turn of the century. A keen look at what the Japanese endured during the early period of discrimination and residency in America.

This illustration did not make it into the book, so it only appeared in the Collier’s serialization.

 

“Scrubbin’ Day”


“Scrubbin’ Day” (undated)
by Norman Mills Price (1877-1951)
4 x 6 in., pencil sketch on paper
Coppola Collection

European-trained, Price moved to NY in 1912 and established himself as an illustrator. A stickler for detail, he was almost instantly successful for his well-researched images with authentic costumes and accuracy in all aspects of his portrayals. People generally enjoyed looking at the details of his illustrations. His magazine illustrations were published by American Magazine, Cosmopolitan, Liberty, St. Nicholas, and Women’s Home Companion. At the time of his death, Price was honorary president of the Society of Illustrators in New York.

Price had a strong ink line, so it is nice to see this sketch, with its entire atmosphere filled in, as an example of how he worked out an idea.

I have sent this and a few other Price drawings off to the Canadian line-smith, Gerhard, whom I have commissioned to develop inked versions of the drawings.

“Christmas Greeting”


“Christmas Greeting” (undated)
by Norman Mills Price (1877-1951)
4 x 6 in., pencil sketch on paper
Coppola Collection

European-trained, Price moved to NY in 1912 and established himself as an illustrator. A stickler for detail, he was almost instantly successful for his well-researched images with authentic costumes and accuracy in all aspects of his portrayals. People generally enjoyed looking at the details of his illustrations. His magazine illustrations were published by American Magazine, Cosmopolitan, Liberty, St. Nicholas, and Women’s Home Companion. At the time of his death, Price was honorary president of the Society of Illustrators in New York.

Price had a strong ink line, so it is nice to see this sketch, with its entire atmosphere filled in, as an example of how he worked out an idea. The card was to come from the US Harvester Co.

I have sent this and a few other Price drawings off to the Canadian line-smith, Gerhard, whom I have commissioned to develop inked versions of the drawings.

“Girl Scout”


“Girl Scout” (undated)
by Norman Mills Price (1877-1951)
5 x 7 in., pencil sketch on paper
Coppola Collection

European-trained, Price moved to NY in 1912 and established himself as an illustrator. A stickler for detail, he was almost instantly successful for his well-researched images with authentic costumes and accuracy in all aspects of his portrayals. People generally enjoyed looking at the details of his illustrations. His magazine illustrations were published by American Magazine, Cosmopolitan, Liberty, St. Nicholas, and Women’s Home Companion. At the time of his death, Price was honorary president of the Society of Illustrators in New York.

Price had a strong ink line, so it is nice to see this sketch, with its entire atmosphere filled in, as an example of how he worked out an idea. This was listed as the sketch for a magazine cover, featuring a Girl Scout, in the 1920s.

I have sent this and a few other Price drawings off to the Canadian line-smith, Gerhard, whom I have commissioned to develop inked versions of the drawings.

“From the Rockies”


“From the Rockies” (December 30, 1893) 12/30
Harper’s Weekly, vol 37, December 30, p 1624.
by Edward Winsor (EW) Kemble (1861-1933)
6 x 9 in., ink on Board
Coppola Collection

126 years ago, today…!

EW Kemble had a quite noteworthy career as an illustrator. An early contributor to the new Life magazine (1881), Kemble’s work got the attention of Mark Twain, who invited Kemble to illustrate the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn(1884). He subsequently illustrated several other famous books, including Twain’s Puddin’ Head Wilson (1894), Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1891 edition), Washington Irving’s Knickerbocker History of New York(1893 edition), and many of Joel Chandler Harris’ Uncle Remus stories, starting in the late 1880s.

Thanks to the fame he garnered from Huck Finn, Kemble became the go-to artist for representing African American people and culture, which is how he ended up illustrating both Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Uncle Remus. The negative stereotypes in his widespread imagery influenced the way cartoonists depicted these subjects for generations.

Included here is a “suggestion for illustration” by John Kendrick (JK) Bangs. Bangs was an American author, humorist, editor and satirist.

In 1888, Bangs left “Life Magazine” to work at “Harper’s Magazine,” “Harper’s Bazaar” and “Harper’s Young People,” though he continued to contribute to Life. From 1889 to 1900 he held the title of Editor of the Departments of Humor for all three Harper’s magazines and from 1899 to 1901 served as active editor of “Harper’s Weekly.” Bangs also served for a short time (January–June 1889) as the first editor of “Munsey’s Magazine.”

Looks like Bangs wanted Kemble to recycle this gag, which is (admittedly) pretty funny. This cartoon appeared on the last page of the volume 37 issues, December 30, 1893.

From the Rockies

Bear (to Tompkins). “Why, hullo brother Jim. How you’ve changed!”

Tompkins. “I ain’t your brother Jim.”

Bear (with a laugh). “Can’t fool me, Jim; I’d know that suit o’ yourn anywhere. Where’ve you been all these days?”